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whistler or steamboat - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by topwater View Post
is it worth risking a week of -10 weather at steamboat, or no new snow?

the weather is a crap shoot in any ski vacation. pick the best mountain and in that regard steamboat shouldn't even be in the discussion.

this is such a silly discussion... may w/b vs jackson hole, tahoe, utah... but steamboat, that's just crazy.
How often have you skied at both resorts? How much $$ and time have you invested in each?

Weather at Steamboat, or any Colorado Summit/Eagle resort is not a crap-shoot. You'll almost always have dry snow, and (often), sun. Colorado receives more than 300 days of sunshine per year.

What's "best" isn't based solely on terrain - although it may for you. Steamboat's terrain, while not in the epic class of JH, The Bird, or Whistler, is still plenty fine.

A "crap-shoot" is investing $$ thousands on a family trip to Whistler, and betting on no rain or fog. Many have made that bet, and lost.

Whistler is a bit like Vancouver (where I was raised). When the sun shines, it has no peer. The views are spectacular and your options are vast. When it doesn't, it can be a long, gloomy trial.
post #32 of 48
I would have to say that I AGREE with the Captain here.... When I use to travel around to ski we would follow the storms.... no reservations, no plans and almost always pow......
post #33 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
How often have you skied at both resorts? How much $$ and time have you invested in each?
40-50 days at w/b... and i live in steamboat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
Weather at Steamboat, or any Colorado Summit/Eagle resort is not a crap-shoot. You'll almost always have dry snow, and (often), sun. Colorado receives more than 300 days of sunshine per year.
do you want to ski or get a tan? and dry snow on flat terrain is beat by wet snow on steep terrain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
What's "best" isn't based solely on terrain - although it may for you. Steamboat's terrain, while not in the epic class of JH, The Bird, or Whistler, is still plenty fine.
i could see if w/b had nothing other than skiing going for it... but the village has way more going on than ski time square or downtown steamboat... and is much more centralized.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
A "crap-shoot" is investing $$ thousands on a family trip to Whistler, and betting on no rain or fog. Many have made that bet, and lost.
don't go skiing and bet against bad weather in the mountains. it happens in the wonderous land of colorado too (in fact it even rains here occasionally). yes, you have better odds of sun in colorado... but i think the odds of fresh snow are higher in the pacific northwest.

like i said, it's a silly question and comparison. i think i'll start a thread whether to ski st anton or holiday valley.
post #34 of 48
Quote:
don't go skiing and bet against bad weather in the mountains. it happens in the wonderous land of colorado too (in fact it even rains here occasionally). yes, you have better odds of sun in colorado... but i think the odds of fresh snow are higher in the pacific northwest.

like i said, it's a silly question and comparison. i think i'll start a thread whether to ski st anton or holiday valley.
Having skied the "powder" of the pacific coast, I'd take the "old" snow of Colorado any day. The sun is, well, just the icing on the cake.
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
Having skied the "powder" of the pacific coast, I'd take the "old" snow of Colorado any day. The sun is, well, just the icing on the cake.
You're right. It sucks out here. We have all this new snow lying around and we can't get a tan.

Seriously, it's what you're used to. I don't mind heavy new snow. It's fun and the crud will make a skier out of you. I don't much go for sunny days because it usually means that there is little to no new (at least in these parts) and things begin to pack down. I've not had the best time skiing in the resorts of interior B.C. because they have this consolidated "old" snow that just isn't as fun for me as some good mashed potatoes. Give me a 12" dump of Mt. Baker prime and I'm in heaven.
post #36 of 48
Whistler is a great mountain and if your an expert, you just deal with the weather. But for a beginner or intermediate rider, I think Steamboat would be a better choice.
post #37 of 48
We just returned from 4 days at Keystone - not the most challenging terrain, or the deepest snow (actually, the least snow in Summit).

But, on two of the 4 days, we surfed boot-deep powder (4" to 5") to the right of Peru lift, speckled with sunshine. In the trees, it was deeper.

These aren't the 12" dumps of Mt. Baker or Whistler. Far from it. But, skiing soft fluff with the sun reflecting like millions of diamonds, isn't all bad.

It's a personal choice. I've had many great years of skiing in the PNW. If I was still there, I'd continue to cherish the benefits.

But, I now live in Colorado (again). I vastly prefer it.
post #38 of 48
Quote:
on two of the 4 days, we surfed boot-deep powder (4" to 5") to the right of Peru lift, speckled with sunshine. In the trees, it was deeper.

These aren't the 12" dumps of Mt. Baker or Whistler. Far from it. But, skiing soft fluff with the sun reflecting like millions of diamonds, isn't all bad.
Exactly!

Those foot+ dumps maybe great for building bases. It's the 4-5" in Colorado (and Utah/Interior BC) that skiing dreams are lived and re-lived.

I'm sure if one lives nearby and skis a couple days every week, ANY place can have some great day each season. Even in the snow-poor northeast, we've got our share of "powder" in for the form of foot deep mash patota! But knock as you want, the Rockies excel in these frequent "falls" (not neccessarily "dumps") of a few inches every few days that makes a skier come back time and time again, rarely disappoints.
post #39 of 48
4-5 inches doesn't really cut it when you are use to bottomless.....Deep snow it's where it's at. Of course there is everything for everyone but steep and deep are what I look for and then tree lines..... an open bowl is also enjoyable once in a while...

What the year up in Whistler ! Steady snow except for a couple a week of sun that we just add.... and cold to :
post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whistlerpow View Post
4-5 inches doesn't really cut it when you are use to bottomless.....Deep snow it's where it's at. Of course there is everything for everyone but steep and deep are what I look for and then tree lines..... an open bowl is also enjoyable once in a while...
Quote:
Seriously, it's what you're used to. I don't mind heavy new snow.
I'm the opposite. I'm so "used to it" that I do mind it.

Having lived in California and skied the Sierra cement, feet and feet of it, mind you, I can't help but be reminded they aren't nearly as light as those in Utah/Colorado, which I prefer infinitely!

Even in the east coast, there're usually a few of these multi feet dumps throughout the winter, as many Stowe ESA participants would testify. But I simply can't get too excited skiing these multi feet mash patatos. The fact there are a lot more of them in the pacific coast doesn't make such a huge difference to me.
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
I'm the opposite. I'm so "used to it" that I do mind it.

Having lived in California and skied the Sierra cement, feet and feet of it, mind you, I can't help but be reminded they aren't nearly as light as those in Utah/Colorado, which I prefer infinitely!

Even in the east coast, there're usually a few of these multi feet dumps throughout the winter, as many Stowe ESA participants would testify. But I simply can't get too excited skiing these multi feet mash patatos. The fact there are a lot more of them in the pacific coast doesn't make such a huge difference to me.
This is crazy, cause today I was again in very light snow ho ! and deep to : lol and reading all this is getting to be very funny... matter of fact I am laughing my head off right now
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
Having skied the "powder" of the pacific coast, I'd take the "old" snow of Colorado any day. The sun is, well, just the icing on the cake.

Boy if you could have been on that foot of Cascade cement we have gotten each day this week. I rode the lift with a guy from Denver a few weeks back who was getting his first initiation in PNW "Powder." Pretty funny to hear him complain about our heavy wet stuff. I told him I could ski that dry light stuff out in CO all day on a pair of GS skis.
post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by pete944 View Post
Ok so now I need to know the name of the Irish Pub or any other suggestions or hints.
thanks
Pete
About 100 meters above base of the hill is the Slopeside Grill. Across the road from it is The Tugboat. Neither is particularly Irish in design, but you can get a Jamisons or Bushmills in either pub. Not sure about Harp or a good stout. Live music at Tugboat most nights, and both offer a good time, and interesting food.

I've spent a bit of time at both W/B and The Boat. With a 7 year old, Steamboat is pretty much a no-lose proposition. Dynamite ski school, unbelievably friendly locals, and just enough challenge for many folks, especially if you like trees and soft bumps. Only been disappointed by lack of good snow once over the course of several visits.

W/B is the real deal for adrenaline junkies, strong skiers able to adapt to major changes in conditions, and young folks that need to learn how to drink. Absolutely anything that you could wish for as far as terrain and degree of challenge, no matter your skiing/riding level. MAJOR factor for W/B is weather. Been skunked there more often than I care to recall, but can usually find one part of the resort that's got descent conditions on any given day. W/B is so large that there can be three different weather fronts effecting the place at the same time. I'll be out there in a few weeks, so hope that current snowfall trend continues.

Have a blast,
Bazzer
post #44 of 48
No contest -Whistler. Huge terrain, lots of variety, fun village. You can spend a week there and not run out of new places to ski. Big vertical gives you big weather variations from top to bottom. If its raining down below, it might be snowing in the middle and sunny up top. Plus they have Canadian Beer.
post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by pete944 View Post
Ok so now I need to know the name of the Irish Pub or any other suggestions or hints.
thanks
Pete
This is an important question that merits a response.

We've skied Whistler more days than I can count. Of all the pubs, our favorite, by far, is an excellent Irish pub with superb live music.

Go to Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub, near Excalibur Gondola - right at the base of everything.

The music is outstanding, the beer excellent, and the vibe upbeat and slightly raucous. Simply: perfect!
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by pete944 View Post
Thank you guys for all the help.
I would go to JH . We where there once and had a great time stayed at the hostel.
Wife has always wanted to go to SB. We will have our seven year old daughter and with the dollar it looks as if SB will be it.
Hopefully WB next year
Thanks again
Pete
Just got back from SB yesterday. Had a hell of a time landing at Hayden last Wed. (Back and forth between there and Denver three times) but once there, the skiing was incredible. Tons of snow and everything was very skiable.

Try Mahogany Ridge for dinner in town - best meal we had.
post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whistlerpow View Post

It's funny people go to Whistler once or twice and they got it all figure out... The price to pay for all the snow that we get here is dense snow and rain.... But do you really know how often it happen...? This year It rained once on December 4 and I have been in beautiful light snow since....not champagne powder but light cold snow that fly's over your head when you go through it !

Last year we had one or maybe two dumps of heavier snow with rain.... if you put that beside all the quality days and the good storms it is insignificant... Yes there is a very small chance that you could get bad wheather but there is a much better chance that you are going to get powder specially in March....

Anybody else from Whistler who can help us demystified this reputation made by a fews unlucky individuals.


If you don't risk it you won't get it !


I've been to Whistler twice and bother times I loved the snow, didn't seem too wet to me. I went once in mid December 2010 and then again in March 2011. I think it was great both times, a little better in March though.

 

post #48 of 48

Whistler is one of the best mountains in the world...when the snow is not wet/heavy.  And in my experience, that doesn't happen too often.  In my mind, a trip to Whistler should not be planned in advance (if you truly seek light/dry powder).  Whistler is something you keep in mind for a last-minute trip when the conditions are epic.  That's my 2 cents. 

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