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Base Flatness

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
How flat should the bases be, at what point do you say, base grind is required.


I got a true bar and ran it over a fresh stoneground pair of skis, very flat no light seepage at all, nice and flat.

Then took it to a couple of pairs of skis that have about 5-10 days on them. Flat at tips and tails, but in the mid waist sections, I have some minimal, light showing through on the P-tex portion of the skis (the edges are higher, so would say ever so slight convex shaping. The thing is, the space is pretty uniform nothing like the photos a tongar, etc. that show convex. To me it didn't seem much, I couldn't measure it even if I tried.

I would suspect this is pretty common as the edges are a harder surface than the p-tex.

So when do you say, stone grind needed, got to get it flat, is there some measurements, and amount of light emmitted, rules of thumb, etc?

Someone have a link, or photos on the point of concern and when it should be worked?
post #2 of 12
If you are edge high, just get a file guide of the right angle and remove some metal. I generally get a base grind when the ptex is all torn up.
post #3 of 12
I have over 100 day's on my AC4's with only one, may be two stone grinds. You don't need to be to picky, just keep waxing them.

If they ski ok, forget about it.

I've been thinking about having them done, but I keep asking myself, why, they ski fine and glide great.
post #4 of 12
I have been very impressed with this: http://www.reliableracing.com/detail...2100&reload=no

It definitely gets my base flat and is a whole lot cheaper the stone grinds.
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blizzboy283 View Post
I have been very impressed with this: http://www.reliableracing.com/detail...2100&reload=no

It definitely gets my base flat and is a whole lot cheaper the stone grinds.
Thats pretty interesting, but what about if the base is worn below the edges, does that thing cut steel as well?

Edit: Nevermind, I guess it does, since it has a magnet. How easy is it to use?
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Thats pretty interesting, but what about if the base is worn below the edges, does that thing cut steel as well?

Edit: Nevermind, I guess it does, since it has a magnet. How easy is it to use?
It comes with a steel blade and a stone blade. There are also various other grit stones available.

It is practically fool proof. If you can scrape your ski after waxing then you can use this tool. I'm a huge fan. It says to use it every 2 days on the snow but I don't want to go through my bases that fast. All you need is between 3-5 passes and your skis are freshly stone ground and flat!
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blizzboy283 View Post
All you need is between 3-5 passes and your skis are freshly stone ground and flat!
Fail.

Nice link though. I have one, haven't used it in about 10 years.
post #8 of 12

New Stones!

Check out the new "ruby" stones they offer now! WAY BETTER! (IMO) There is also a new xtra coarse stone available that just shreds the base. (be carefull) I had just been using mine with the steel cutter bar to cut off excess Ptex after base welding (because that's all it would really do - is just knock off the high spots) untill I bought the new set of stones - this thing is now a base leveling/structuring machine! And they don't seem to leave the base very fuzzy at all! Time will tell how well they continue to cut after initial wear and re"dressing" with a diamond stone but so far I would say the new stones perform much better!.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Fail.

Nice link though. I have one, haven't used it in about 10 years.
According to my true bar:

PASS


It certainly beats paying $40 for a stone grind. It may not put as much structure in the ski as a real stone tune but if you are capable with brushes then it does wonders for the ski.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4cznskier View Post
Check out the new "ruby" stones they offer now! WAY BETTER! (IMO) There is also a new xtra coarse stone available that just shreds the base. (be carefull) I had just been using mine with the steel cutter bar to cut off excess Ptex after base welding (because that's all it would really do - is just knock off the high spots) untill I bought the new set of stones - this thing is now a base leveling/structuring machine! And they don't seem to leave the base very fuzzy at all! Time will tell how well they continue to cut after initial wear and re"dressing" with a diamond stone but so far I would say the new stones perform much better!.
Thanks for the heads up. I was looking at them and was debating on which grit. Which one have you used/recommend?
post #11 of 12
I bought and have used all 4 new stones from Tognar and like most every thing else they offer there is good info included.....

http://skivisions.us/504.html

I started with the coarsest (my bases were pretty hashed and mostly base high) and used it just enough to get the ptex mostly flat without getting into the metal edge, and it didn't take much! When using these stones (like sandpaper) you are really just making a series of finer scratches and once the surface is thoroughly scratched with a particular grit they don't cut quite as well - time to switch to finer grit. Work progressively finer grits untill you have the size structure you are looking for. Depending on your base edge bevel and how "fresh" of an edge you want to end up with - I don't worry about gettin' every last nick out, you may want to use the metal cutting bar at this point (be sure to use a stone first to remove the hardened burrs). If you want to take the edge down much you will also be taking the base down and removing the structure the stone left so you will need to re-impart the structure after you have set your edge angles. I didn't need/want to take the metal down much so contrary to the recommendations I went ahead and lightly ran the finest stone into the edge some taking care to offset each pass a little to spread the wear on the stone out. The coarser stone edges will break away worse when they hit the metal than the extra fine - especially if there are hardened burrs. Alpinord has posted some excellent depictions on developing the edge angles. I also like this guys conservative approach to base and edge maintenance and his "evolving edge" philosophy.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=50730

Just so it's known..... I am not a ski pro, tech, rep, racer, patrolman, instructor, extreme skier or anything special. Just a guy who has been skiing and working with my hands for 30+ years and these are just some of my personal observations, experiences, and opinions.

HTH
post #12 of 12
I must be missing something. I have over 100 days on my AC4 the last time they were the shop was over 50 ski days ago. I just touch up the edges with a moon flex and lightly file if I feel the need. The skis still bite into the firm surface and the bases have a ton of wax and not much structure or anything that resembles the factory bases. The skis are fast and ski great.

I've thought about taking them in or using a buddy's base flattener but they glide so well I don't want to.
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