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Meaning of Life......

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Bill McCollom, the Managing Editor of "Ski Racing" magazine, was talking in his latest editorial column about his second torn ACL and the realities of adult participation in competitive sports. He ended it with the following motorcycle quote, which I found to be very descriptive of my own attitude and that of the majority of people I’m happy to ski and race with:

“Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece, but to skid across the line broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, leaking oil, shouting GERONIMO!”


But it also made me wonder what those, who pride themselves in always being in control, never falling and never being hurt, would say about it.

Oh well since we have this new feature lets see how many EpicSkiers can relate the above to their lifestyle….

[ May 17, 2002, 06:35 AM: Message edited by: VK ]
post #2 of 25
VK, I would have loved to say "absolutely", but had to back off a bit. The reason is that the responsibilty of being the sole breadwinner to pay for a mortgage, a car, a wife and a baby, makes me a bit more conservative about putting myself in harms way too often. A few years ago, yeah, that was me.
post #3 of 25
The meaning of life is: To eat and not be eaten in order to pass on your genetic code from its temporary container
post #4 of 25
That’s interesting. In my youth I absolutely lived that way. I have skidded on the pavement from motorcycle wrecks. It isn’t pretty. A good friend of mine died 7 years ago from kidney failure. He wasn’t supposed to live beyond the age of 21. It was a childhood sickness when he was first diagnosed. We skied and vacationed together for many years. We worked at the same ski area. Our parents had ski houses there. We met when he was 17. At this age he lived by the creed in VK’s post, as did I. He is still the only guy I know that has the dubious distinction for having been stopped for speeding and drunk driving while on a bicycle. A quote I always heard around my home was “live fast, die young, and leave a good looking corpse.”

As he grew older he swore he would quit drinking alcohol when he turned 30. This from a guy that had a tap installed in is kitchen refrigerator. He held true to his word and did stop drinking on his 30th birthday.

I was hanging out at is house a few weeks before he died and asked him if he still felt the same way he did many years ago about living fast and dying young. He told me no, he didn’t he wanted to live as long as he could. What I found interesting as I left that afternoon was Mike had learned he was mortal. Life is precious. His values had changed the closer he was to his death. He was 35. He was a well-liked renegade, the ski area named a tree run after him. Peace Mike.

Most people have a self-preservation switch. For a few it is near the extreme, ie. Evil Knievel and son, David Blaine, Shane McConkey, while most of us only wish we had ¼ of the bravado. There is a huge difference between calculated risk and stupidity. There is no need to end up in the Darwin award’s, you won’t be there to collect the prize.

As JohnH states; “had to back off a bit.” So did I.

Jim
post #5 of 25
Perhaps the skid marks of life are not to be seen outside of one's self.

I believe all of us would wish to die young,

as late in life as possible!

CalG
post #6 of 25
I am not sure how old you are VK, but I am sure you realize that the older one gets the more important is to preserve one's body. The quote you provided (reproduced below) sounds heroic, except that it says nothing of the pain, suffering and lost time that such a journey can have.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece, but to skid across the line broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, leaking oil, shouting GERONIMO!”

At my age, I would rather have a continuous series of great experiences (albeit none of them extreme or dangerous), than have "GERONIMO experiences" which are few and far between, due to various injuries. Obviously my age is a factor in this thinking. Like others, I used to think that I was "invincible" when I was younger. And I trained, competed and played accordingly.
Besides, would you not agree that the people who have any longevity in a sport, are usually the ones who age gracefully, understand their limitations and avoid injury.
post #7 of 25
I gotta go with TomB on this one. I hate it when I went a little too far out there and have to ski with pain or miss some days.
post #8 of 25
Going to rehab, cuts into my ability to bring home the bacon - and I can't go skiing!

So I think I'll keep concentrating on being pretty and let the young ones do the crazy stuff.
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by SCSA:
So I think I'll keep concentrating on being pretty
You need to concentrate harder.
post #10 of 25
'Uh, I can take this chair down, can't I?"
post #11 of 25
Life:

Enjoy it.
Appreciate it.
Make a positive impact.

And remember, just cause the answer is 42 doesn't mean the question can't be "What do you get when you multiply six by eight?"

S
post #12 of 25
I had to chime back in.

A friend of mine (Female, mid 40s) is pretty much as close to that motto as any woman I know. Two of times I've gone mountain biking with her, she's gone to the ER. She recently took up raquetball (a month or two ago). I just got an email from her. She dove for the ball, made the great shot, put her foot down, and somehow managed to snap her ankle. She's at the ER as I type this. She's a blast to hang out with, but she does lose a lot of time to injuries.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Wear the fox hat ?:

Make a positive impact.

S
Is that anythink like a crater? (leave a good impression.... in the dirt, with your face)
post #14 of 25
Okay, everyone! Some else just referenced Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy! Another sip of beer!
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by JohnH:
Is that anythink like a crater? (leave a good impression.... in the dirt, with your face)
John, actually, if you want to go into Deep Thought (LM, did you pick up on that???), that's exactly what I mean.

Leaving a good impression in the dirt. But, as you point out, if you do it, some of the dirt will end up on your face, and may cause you pain.
But if my face: My vision, my taste, my attitude as expressed in my smile, is impressed in the dirt, and makes the dirt, well, less dirt-y, and better, then I hope I leave several craters.

S
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by JohnH:
Is that anythink like a crater? (leave a good impression.... in the dirt, with your face)
John, actually, if you want to go into Deep Thought (LM, did you pick up on that???), that's exactly what I mean.

Leaving a good impression in the dirt. But, as you point out, if you do it, some of the dirt will end up on your face, and may cause you pain.
But if my face: My vision, my taste, my attitude as expressed in my smile, is impressed in the dirt, and makes the dirt, well, less dirt-y, and better, then I hope I leave several craters.

S
post #17 of 25
Hell no. Do you have any idea how reluctant docs are to give painkillers nowadays?
post #18 of 25
Big difference between exhilarating experiences and plain stupidity. Everybody, at a very early age, should make a list of things they really want to do and experience before they die -- then work that list. The concept is a whole lot different than just randomly running naked across lanes of freeway traffic at rush hour.
post #19 of 25
Having kids has changed me, toned it down a lot.

I try to teach my son concepts of measured risk.

I stopped by an old "pea patch" airport today and thought back to my first flight instructor. Dick Dearborn was an old buzzard who imparted the old aviation adage. "There's old pilots and bold pilots. But there ain't no old, bold pilots."
post #20 of 25
I hope to die poor. Dieing rich is a waste.*

(I don't have kids, & if I did I'd only want to leave them money if they were underage or disabled in some way).
post #21 of 25
post #22 of 25
Skid marks are for your underpants, not the road!
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Robin:
Skid marks are for your underpants, not the road!
now that just depends
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Robin:
Skid marks are for your underpants, not the road!
now that just depends
post #25 of 25
Depends
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