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I Have A Pretty Small Apartment...

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I have finally done what I've been meaning to for ages, and purchased a wax iron, scraper, brush, and so on to start hot waxing my skis.

The thing is, I live in an apartment. Its pretty small. I have no garage and a tiny balcony (barely enough room for a single chair). From what I've read, not only is waxing rather messy (especially the scraping), but things can sometimes be bad enough to require a mask.

Now, I'll be using pretty basic (read: on the cheap side) waxes. No super fancy fluorocarbons, or other toxic-fume-generating-sounding things.

If I open up as many doors and windows as I can (not many), turn on a few fans, and lay a sheet down to catch all the scrapings, will I be able to wax my skis without suffering any fume-induced brain damage? Will I ever be able to get the wax out of the carpet? I know that there has to be at least a few others out there in my situation... How do you do it?
post #2 of 20
I guarantee that my apartment is smaller then yours. If I can do it, so can you. Surprisingly, there's no smell involved with waxing. I don't open any windows or doors--there's just no smell at all. Just make sure you don't exceed the maximum temperature of the wax. I use dominator zoom (aka el cheapo)--it gets the job done. I don't even have a real workbench--I just place the ski on an excercise bench and push the ski against a wall. As for scraping, that's the messiest part. But I have hardwood floors so all I have to do is take a dustbuster and vacuum it all up--takes 2 minutes and the floor is good as new. Since you have a carpet--you could either try to vacuum the wax out of the carpet (probably will work) or you can try and lay newspapers and vacuum the wax off of that.

Honestly, waxing at home is one of the easiest things you can do. It's really not smelly or messy after you clean it up with the vacuum. Just make sure you don't drip the wax anywhere except the ski and make sure you have a towel handy to wipe down the iron after you're done. That's it.

Happy waxing.
post #3 of 20
Don't worry about the ventilation if you're not using fluoros.

If you're careful with a sheet, you should be able to keep everything (except the sheet) tidy. On the other hand, you will not be able to get the wax out of your carpet (unless you do it right away).

Scraper mess is the biggest problem. There are some techniques to minimize it:

- Use the crayoning technique. I do this sometimes, though more out of a cheapskate desire to save wax than to avoid mess. The preferred technique (see numerous other discussions) is to touch the end of the wax bar briefly to the iron, rub some wax on the ski, repeat. Then iron.

- Use something aborbent between the wax and the ski when you're ironing. I haven't actually tried this myself, but a number of people who otherwise seem to know what they're doing do. The original Toko Wax Mouse was specifically designed for this technique, as I recall.
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the fast helpful replies

mrzonwin, I wish I had hardwood floors. I might just give it a shot in the kitchen on the tile. I don't have anywhere near enough faith in my vacuum to just drop shavings on my carpet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
Don't worry about the ventilation if you're not using fluoros.
This is exactly what I was hoping to hear

I was planning on crayoning anyway, it makes sense that it would cut down on extra and wasted wax, but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
- Use something aborbent between the wax and the ski when you're ironing. I haven't actually tried this myself, but a number of people who otherwise seem to know what they're doing do. The original Toko Wax Mouse was specifically designed for this technique, as I recall.
I'm not exactly sure what you mean by this. I'll google around for the Toko Wax Mouse when I get the chance tomorrow, and hopefully learn more, but in all the waxing research I've done I've never stumbled upon anything like this. Any more details?
post #5 of 20
This is not a Wax Mouse, but do you notice the clip on the front of the Toko Cat iron shown here:



That was designed to hold a piece of lint-free absorbent material

, either paper or cloth.

The idea is to allow wax that hasn't soaked into the base to saturate the absorbent material so you don't have as much to scrape.
post #6 of 20
Terry at Slidewright: http://www.slidewright.com/products.php?cat=33,talks about a teflon sheet that he uses on spray waxes for ironing. I use his waxes but not the teflon, due to cost. But look at the site to get more info.
post #7 of 20
No problems wax away. I do it at 5 star hotel rooms and dont mess anything up.........and I is still be knowing who is I am.......
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
This is not a Wax Mouse, but do you notice the clip on the front of the Toko Cat iron shown here:



That was designed to hold a piece of lint-free absorbent material

, either paper or cloth.

The idea is to allow wax that hasn't soaked into the base to saturate the absorbent material so you don't have as much to scrape.
You sure about that? I thought that was for wax laden sheets to be melted against the base, reducing the amount of wax being applied.

The other technique would not be to drip, but to crayon the wax on before heating.

Be careful not to raise the base temps too high. ie. never spend more than 15 consequetive seconds over any spot. The bases will burn and refuse to hold wax.
post #9 of 20
I just scrape at the resort.
post #10 of 20
I live in a one bedroom apartment with hardwood floors, and I'm pretty cheap in the way I do my waxing. I just throw down a sheet and do my waxing on the floor. I just use a universal wax and don't have any smell issues. I think the hot wax smells pretty good, actually. I don't do my edges or any other tuning, but doing my own waxing has been cheap, easy, and had pretty good results.
post #11 of 20
The teflon sheets are useful to protect the base when you use minimal wax while hot waxing. Once you get used to it and keep things moving, you can iron directly on a thin layer......but be careful.

Using fiberlene or other absorbent towel between the iron and base can collect excess wax to help reduce scraping. Place a bin, box or trash container at the tail so when you scrape, the majority can easily be deposited. Put down floor (and furniture) protection to catch debris for easier and quick clean-up. A small Shop Vac might be worth considering.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
You sure about that? I thought that was for wax laden sheets to be melted against the base, reducing the amount of wax being applied.
I'm convinced it was really designed to take klister off, but it works for all three.
post #13 of 20
How many skis can you do with a single fibrelene pad? Assuming that wax is not drippping down the sides of the ski....

I'm always looking for ways to save time, especially scraping.
post #14 of 20
As with all things tuning and skiing, it's subjective how much mileage you'd get out of a fiberlene sheet. If you combine it with crayoning or hot touching, you could do several skis with a sheet. You could experiment with paper towel to see how that works or brown paper bags.

Regarding time savings, roto-brushing can reduce scraping time and of course tons of brushing time & effort. It'll increase the mess containment issues in a small space though......
post #15 of 20
I bought a cheap shower curtain from the Dollar Store and catch my wax scrapings on that, then just dump the residue in the can when finished. -- It also doubles as a protective covering over my foldown seats when carting our skis inside my vehicle .


Talk about being a cheap SOB
post #16 of 20
Learn to think outside the box! And the apartment.

Devise a set of clamps to go on your balcony rail and do all of your sharpening and waxing out there.

Shavings .... who cares? Let the guy below you deal with messy shavings. If you live in that small an apartment you probably don't drive a car that's worth "keying" .... ????

post #17 of 20
I find the little curly-cues from the file tend to get caught in carpeting. And rotobrushing can be dusty, but otherwise unless you fluoro, its pretty clean with just a tarp.
post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by c1er View Post
I find the little curly-cues from the file tend to get caught in carpeting. And rotobrushing can be dusty, but otherwise unless you fluoro, its pretty clean with just a tarp.
This post, and all similar ones before it, have pushed me over the edge, more than enough. My advanture into in-home waxing shall begin over an old bed sheet (or maybe 2 or 3, just to be safe).

Thanks a lot for the encouragement!!!
post #19 of 20
hot wax in it's liquid form will go right through 2 or 3 bed sheets.

(I learned the hard way.) You need plastic or cardboard or something other than fabric.
post #20 of 20
Plastic tarp is the way to go.

Another topic is doing fiberglass repairs to a kayak in an apartment (fortunately it was my wife's kayak).
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