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Goggle Questions

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I have a few very simple questions for goggles. Do you recommend getting multiple lenses with your goggles or is there one tint that does ok in all conditions? I know that one lens won't be great for everything but will it be OK for everything? I will mainly do daytime skiing but there will also be times at night. I have gone to the websites of many major goggle manufacturers and know that there are great tints for low light, flat light, bright days, night time, etc. but still would like some feedback. Please help clear up my confusion. Thanks.

Billy
post #2 of 23
Billy as a fellow Ice Coaster who loves night skiing let me give ya some advice, buy two pair of goggles. Get one pair of bronze colored lenses (like most goggles come stock since the West rules all of skidom).
Get another pair with either rose tint (best for flat light), yellow (also best for flat light) or clear (best for night). If you cannot find googles that come with these lenses (you should be able to), get a pair of decent goggles that have an inexpensive lens (non-mirrored) already in them and buy the lens you want and swap it out.
By doing this you have a pair for bright days and a pair for flat light days and night time.

If you can only afford one pair, I'd go with rose colored tints, they work in most conditions, but can be a tad bright in sunlight. Or have a pair of dark day goggles and wear sunglasses on bright days. You could even go the clear route and wear sunglasses under them, but I'm sure some would call you a gaper for this.
post #3 of 23
I've always skied with yellow / amber lenses in my goggles. They seem to work for me under all conditions. I've done night-league racing in them, skied in fog, whiteouts, sunny days, etc. There are probably more "optimal" lens choices for some of these conditions, but they work for me.
post #4 of 23
For flat light the Oakley High Intensity yellow is the best. They make them a a few of there frame sizes.

As said above it's easier to have a number of goggles then changing the lens.

It all depends on how often you ski. I stopped buying cheap goggles years ago. It does make a difference when you ski alot. Right now I have 4 pairs that I use for differnt lighting. Plus 2 pairs Maui Jim's sunglasses.
post #5 of 23
I have a pair of Smith Phenom with Sensor Mirror lens.Works well for East Coast night and day. Very good for flat light. I ski day and night and don't switch lenses. I might want something darker on bluebird sunny days when the sun is higher in the sky (or if I was at altitude which is not an East coast problem) but that wouldn't be til March when I'd switch to glasses as goggles would be to warm.

I don't really care for overly rose lenses. I've used them and find them too dark at night and the reddish light they do transmit I find very hard on the eyes when it's sunny. The Sensor Mirror spec say light rose base with mirror but the transmission is high enough you don't notice any color.

Forgetting brand, you might try looking at lens specs and getting something with about 70% transmission that is recommended for flat light. That's the best you could come to a day/night goggle for New England.

These are the Smith lenses for comparison -- http://www.smithoptics.com/technolog...tegory=3&id=25
post #6 of 23
Good link, thanks
post #7 of 23
I carry 4 different lenses with me at all times. However if I were to do it again, I would simply buy one of the new (but expensive) electronic tinting goggles.
post #8 of 23
For night, flat light or grey days, I like to see what is there. Clear is the only way I go. I have a few sets of multiple lens goggles (never liked any goggle), and glasses and I always gravitate back to clear. I always try them out figuring they may be "the ones" ... but they never are.

For sunny days, a light grey tint, but most of our eastern hills don't face into the sun at all so we are alway skiing in shadow to one degree or another.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
I've always skied with yellow / amber lenses in my goggles. They seem to work for me under all conditions. I've done night-league racing in them, skied in fog, whiteouts, sunny days, etc. There are probably more "optimal" lens choices for some of these conditions, but they work for me.
I'm sure they work for you, but I would caution anyone traveling to Colorado to get something darker. Skiing in yellow lenses on a sunny high-altitude day would be my version of hell!
post #10 of 23
L2T likes Smith Sensor Mirror lenses, and I don't like them at all, especially in flat light...when mine filled with water between the lenses, I changed to amber which I like much better. Different eyes like different lenses.

I like at least two lenses...amber for flat light (and OK at night) and dark (or sunglasses) for sun.
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
I'm sure they work for you, but I would caution anyone traveling to Colorado to get something darker. Skiing in yellow lenses on a sunny high-altitude day would be my version of hell!
Well, this is me at Vail on a rather sunny day. I didn't have any problems, but maybe my eyes aren't that sensitive? To each their own.

post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
Well, this is me at Vail on a rather sunny day. I didn't have any problems, but maybe my eyes aren't that sensitive? To each their own.
WOW ... I'm impressed. I do have sensitive eyes, though, can't go anywhere without sunglasses.
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help so far. Any thoughts on these choices?

Spy Soldier (permission or rose/silver lens)
Spy Targa II (bronze lens)
Scott Motive (chrome lens)
Scott High Voltage (chrome lens)
post #14 of 23
I've found Smith goggles to have the best quality. My vote would be toward one of the spherical models with the new platinum iridium lenses. Given that we have flat light over 95% of our season, that is very tested advice. The Smith rc36 is also a good lens to pick for overall.

Yuki - clear goggles are fine for nighttime, but suck in true flat light conditions. A reddish or amber tint provides the highest contrast. Yellow is not as good.
post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the awesome info folks. I feel I can make an informed decision,...hopefully
post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
What does blue flash or rose flash mean?
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
I'm sure they work for you, but I would caution anyone traveling to Colorado to get something darker. Skiing in yellow lenses on a sunny high-altitude day would be my version of hell!
That's what I thought too when I bought a second pair of yellow tinted goggles (my primary pair is rose tinted). I have skied with the yellow tint on some bluebird days, I was really quite surprised that I didn't find the yellow too bright. I bought the yellow pair thinking I would use them in poor light conditions only. I have been suprised by the versatility and have gotten more use out of those than I thought I would.

That being said, I still prefer my rose tinted goggles. They perform suprisingly well across just about every condition I ski in, including night skiing. They are a little dark for really late afternoon if the ski is cloudy, but not too bad.

I have skied in sunglasses as well and they are fine for bluebird days, but suck for everything else, even late afternoon on bluebird days. I would imagine similarly tinted goggles are the same.
post #18 of 23
I've got a pair of Spy Soldiers and the quality is excellent, both optically and especially in construction. They have a nice sturdy frame, decent face foam and a rubberized strap to grab the old brain bucket. These are my dark lens, hella bright condition day goggles and they do their job wonderfully, but the mirrored lens gets scratched easily.

In a slight variation from the original topic, I recently lost my "night" goggles. Wow is skiing at night in dark goggles is, um interesting.
post #19 of 23
Hi Billy,
Why don't you buy 2 pairs of goggles with different lenses. I find it less of hassle because I don't have to change lenses out. You can have two goggles in your gear bag. Just choose the goggle that has the lens that would work best for the day.

I noticed that you mentioned Scott goggles. I have been a Scott goggle user most of my skiing years. The chrome amp lens makes for a great sunny day lens. If the light gets flat, it is a so-so lens. You may want to opt for a high intensity yellow color for those conditions.

Also if you buy goggles, get one that fits your face well.

Dennis
post #20 of 23
Billy

I agree with Denny1969, just get two pair. At the end of the ski season, my goggle lenses get trashed, so if the goggles are in good shape, I just replace the lenses. I use either Smith or Scott goggles. For some reason, Scott goggle fits me better. I'm a fan of rose for terrain definition during a sunny day. At night, I am still a fan of clear lenses. I'd also try a few different brands in a store with your hat, some goggles just feel better than others. Cheers, Charlie
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgraves28 View Post
What does blue flash or rose flash mean?
a coating that appears reflective viewed from the outside.
post #22 of 23
Ive got a couple pairs. The Oakley Wisdoms with the high intensity lens works well for night and cloudy/snowy days. On sunny days its usually my spy orbits. I think they are close to the same as the soldier. Good goggles as well. I almost always were a hlemet with them but sometimes on those warm spring days I just have to take of the helmet put on my sunglasses and just enjoy the warm temps.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgraves28 View Post
I have a few very simple questions for goggles. Do you recommend getting multiple lenses with your goggles or is there one tint that does ok in all conditions? I know that one lens won't be great for everything but will it be OK for everything? I will mainly do daytime skiing but there will also be times at night. I have gone to the websites of many major goggle manufacturers and know that there are great tints for low light, flat light, bright days, night time, etc. but still would like some feedback. Please help clear up my confusion. Thanks.

Billy
Go check out www.habervision.com They sell polarized goggles with an orange lens with a blue flash. The light colored lens allows you to see well in flat light while the polarization really works well while cutting the glare. Plus they are cheap!
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