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Forward Flex

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I was conversing with a guy on the chair lift yesterday who had the same boots as me (Rossi Elite Pro 1 Carbon). There is a D-shaped piece of plastic between the upper and lower shell of the boot that limits forward flex/travel. He told me that the Rossi rep. advised him to remove the D-shaped part. He had done so and was happy with the results. It was a short lift ride and the conversation ended. My question is: what are the possitives and negatives of having more forward flex/travel on the boots?
post #2 of 11
Hi KennyK9,

Welcome to EpicSki

Here's a few links to get ya started!

Chris

Ankle Motion, is it needed?

Dont lean on the front?

Back seat skiers

Do you flex the boot while skiing?
post #3 of 11
My stategy has evolved to be lots of forward boot flex and skis without a lot of sidecut. If you have a stiff boot and lots of sidecut a slight forward movement will result in overturning. I could never figure out how people can ski a 12m sidecut ski. I can make my 19m skis turn as fast as needed in any situation. My setup allows me to hang on the front of my boots and then rock back slightly as the turn progresses. I like to feel the carve move back along the ski. There are certainly other ways to skin that cat, but being forward has always been a good thing for me.

I vote for removing the inhibitor. It sounds like it should allow you to have a lighter touch on your skis. If you don't like it can you put it back in?
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses. I've been reading through the links. Forward flex seems to be used for loading the tips to turn, for balance and for suspension. While standing in my boots (buckled) I can't complete a standard barbell squat to the paralell position without getting thrown off balance by not being able to flex my ankle far enough forward-thus having to compensate by bending too much at the waiste/back. I'm trying to translate this to my ski turns. To maintain balance while carving short radius turns very aggressively on say blue/black groomers, I would think a skier would need to be able to flex the ankle far enough forward as to not bottom out on range of motion. Otherwise he would have to make up for it with over-angulation. Sometimes I feel like a metronome. I've also begun having issues with skidding on aggressive short turns-not the intentional type of skid but loss of edge grip. I'm thinking lack of being able to bend my knees enough may be contributing to this. Sound plausible?
post #5 of 11
It sounds like you are on the right track. Just remember that when carving aggressive short turns it is possible to be pulling a few g's. Will your boots allow your ankles to move enough to perform a squat with twice your weight on the bar?
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
It sounds like you are on the right track. Just remember that when carving aggressive short turns it is possible to be pulling a few g's. Will your boots allow your ankles to move enough to perform a squat with twice your weight on the bar?
Good Point! Don't know if I wanna try that. From what I've read so far it sounds like I don't really want to be pressuring the front of the boots all that much anyway. So wouldn't removing the inhibitor give me more range of motion with less tip loading? Also, wouldn't the only downside of more range of motion be that my quads would have to pick up the slack from my skeletal frame bearing less of the force?
post #7 of 11
Try it and see what happens. When you move your shins forward your shins push the boots, you feel the boots pushing back, they are able to push back because the other end of the boots are pushing down on your skis, transferring the pressure to keep your tips pressed into the snow. Your boots are like a spring, the farther you push them the more pressure they transmit. With the boots set stiffer, you get a greater amount of pressure for less movement, with the boots set softer you get more shin movement with less pressure. You can move less in stiffer boots or move more in softer boots to get the same force through the boots to the skis. What really matters is how you are able to get the force you want through to the ski tips while being in the position you want to be in over your skis.
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Try it and see what happens. When you move your shins forward your shins push the boots, you feel the boots pushing back, they are able to push back because the other end of the boots are pushing down on your skis, transferring the pressure to keep your tips pressed into the snow. Your boots are like a spring, the farther you push them the more pressure they transmit. With the boots set stiffer, you get a greater amount of pressure for less movement, with the boots set softer you get more shin movement with less pressure. You can move less in stiffer boots or move more in softer boots to get the same force through the boots to the skis. What really matters is how you are able to get the force you want through to the ski tips while being in the position you want to be in over your skis.
That's a great answer. Sounds like power steering. It would appear that I'll just have to try it to know. The worst case scenario is that I don't like it and have to rivet the inhibitors back in. (Actually the worst case scenario is that I ruin my boots... or break my legs... or tear an ACL... concussion... lawsuit... death...)
post #9 of 11
I don't know what your boots are set up like, but if it's a major modification, it might be worth it to just try some softer flexing boots before you go ahead with it.
post #10 of 11
OR . . . . you could try some Dalbello Krypton Pro ID with a whole range of do-it-yourself modifications. I'm thinking of doing that myself.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by oboe View Post
OR . . . . you could try some Dalbello Krypton Pro ID with a whole range of do-it-yourself modifications. I'm thinking of doing that myself.
So I bought them. Didn't have time to get them set up, so skied the remainder of the season with my Lange 120 Comps (with a rivet removed).

Long story short: I've tried on the Pro ID's three times indoors and have decided that they're WAY too stiff for a person of my height, weight, strength and skill.

Still new in the box, they're for sale, size 24. I'll be going for a pair of Dalbello Krypton Il Moro, also size 24. I think that I'll be able to get those set up right.

Although no true expert (and at the age of 66 time's running out for that) I've never had good results with super stiff boots. Thet don't need to let me do barbell squats - that's pushing it. But I do need some flex.
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