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Hard to take off my Boots

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I tried this in the Bootfitters Forum but got only one suggestion so I'll ask you nonpros.
My new Fischer MX-Pro boots are impossible for me to take off for 15-20 minutes after I come in the lodge. Even after warming up they hurt my heels and cramped my calves trying to take them off.
The boots fit good and ski good but they are hard to put on and impossible to take off when cold.
The only response from the pros was to use a hairdryer and a boot stretcher. That just did not sound practical to me. How do you haul that stuff around in a backpack all morning just so you can change your socks at lunch? Any other suggestions?
post #2 of 28
you are basically trying to open the 2 folds of plastic on the lower boot.

1) try removing your foot with the liner on your foot. might work better?

2) try pulling the boot tongue to the side (not up) and this will help to open the boot more.

all that being said my wifes size 3, Nordica aggressors 150's go on in the AM after heating them in front of the fireplace at the lodge, and don't come off until they are warmed up at the house.
post #3 of 28
Here are my suggestions:

1. Hit the gym, you will not believe how much easier mundane everyday life things will be with more strength.

2. Pull boot tongue all the way forward and out, this will not only open the two folds and keep them open, it will also get the tongue out of the way.

3. Silicone spray in the liner will make it easier to slide in and out of.
post #4 of 28
I tried on fisher boots last year,fit great but was warned could take an hour for them to warm up and get off on a cold day ..also could be hard to get on
post #5 of 28
Hi Steve,
Long time - no see

The suggestion about the tongue out and to the side is a great one.
My question first would be: how are you trying to get the boots off? I see a lot of people sitting in a chair, trying to lift the foot up out of the boot. I tell them to stand up, open up the boot as much as possible (above suggestion) then press with one hand down on the rear spoiler of the boot so the boot stays on the ground, and then drive your knee forward (towards your toes).

Hope this works for you too.

Ursula

PS: Happy New Year to you and your family!
post #6 of 28
They're not kidding about the hairdryer. You can get small folding ones.
post #7 of 28
After unbuckling boot, grab both halves and pull apart as far as they will go. Allow boot to close up again and grab boot tounge and pull it forward between two halves of boot. Push down on back of boot with hands while lifting foot.

Putting boots next to car heater for 10 or 15 minutes helps.

Or you could buy new boots that are easier to get on and off like I did.
post #8 of 28
In the long run, that better boot is your friend and you'll get used to it.

When you come in, you just open the buckles and spread it a bit. That loosens the boot and lets a bit of the warm air circulate inside while you play with your other stuff, or hit the can before you hit the road.

I would try to adjust my routine before I started hitting the boots with silicone or yanking the liner out.

The first time I found myself "locked in" .. I was almost ready to call Fire & Rescue .. for the "jaws" to free my piggies.
post #9 of 28
Ditto on the above recommendations, especially the tongue to the side. A few choice words may help as well plus a couple of grunts. My Lange boots are no joy to take off either.

Doug
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidbump View Post
I tried on fisher boots last year,fit great but was warned could take an hour for them to warm up and get off on a cold day ..also could be hard to get on
That may well apply to Fischer's plug and near plug models with their thick, stiff plastics like most such models. However, I skied the Fischer MX-Pro and am now skiing the "Fischer RC4 Race" which is neither a plug or semi-plug, mostly because I like its narrower mid-foot fit compared to the MX-Pro. The suggestions given so far here all have merit. Socks can also play a role. Wearing smooth feeling, thin socks can help ease the effort with most boots.

Nothing is as quick and easy as getting in and out of the Flexon (or, I suspect, the Krypton) with their cabriolet designs, however, I have had no problems getting in and out of either Fischer models. FWIW, I use the method described by little bear above which I'll quote again here:

"stand up, open up the boot as much as possible... then press with one hand down on the rear spoiler of the boot so the boot stays on the ground, and then drive your knee forward (towards your toes)." -little bear
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
They're not kidding about the hairdryer. You can get small folding ones.
Cgeib carries a hairdryer, and he doesn't have much hair.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
The first time I found myself "locked in" .. I was almost ready to call Fire & Rescue .. for the "jaws" to free my piggies.
If you do call, please be in my district
post #13 of 28
I agree alot of the solution is in the technique. I have Lange Plug 150's and they are a BEAR to take off when cold. I strongly suggest you skip the silicone spray.Try some spray deodorant on your socks- the talc will help the sock slide without building up (like silicone). Side benefit is that your boots smell nice!
post #14 of 28
This problem is another reason I love my Dalbello Kryptons. Besides having a sweet adjustable flex, the shell is designed so that taking them on and off is a breeze. I had a pair of Techicas that I dreaded taking off at the end of the day. They were comfortable skiing but felt like a knife stab to my insteps when I strugggled to remove them. A truely terrible way to end a good day of skiing.

My experience makes me agree that the easiest solution is usually taking your foot out with the inner boot still on it, although this usually requires a rather radical physical manuver not easily done in an icey parking lot.

When putting my ski boots on an old Bill Cosby routine about putting his socks on often comes to mind. He noticed that as he got older and became less flexible that his feet seemed to be moving farther away. Not that Kryps are just for old guys, but in my advancing years I need to take advantage of any technology that makes my ski day easier so I can save my energy for passing the young guys.
post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the good advice. Sounds like it's a common problem that I was lucky enough to avoid for 30 years. I'll chalk it up to the "no pain no gain" philosophy to avoid any negative feelings about my new boots!
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJB View Post
I agree alot of the solution is in the technique. I have Lange Plug 150's and they are a BEAR to take off when cold. I strongly suggest you skip the silicone spray.Try some spray deodorant on your socks- the talc will help the sock slide without building up (like silicone). Side benefit is that your boots smell nice!
Talc gets wet and becomes mud, and it does build up even more so than the silicone spray. Silicone spray is what was prescribed to my father in law to be by a prominent boot-fitter located in Manhattan. He couldn't get in or out of his boots, the spray solved the problem.
post #17 of 28
Or, spend the big bucks and buy a boot spreader like they use in the shop...ironically shown on a Fischer.

post #18 of 28
I always wondered how that thing worked. It appears to me that they get a caulking gun and modify it to use with ski boots. A handy guy could rig one of these things up for much less than what they charge for them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Or, spend the big bucks and buy a boot spreader like they use in the shop...ironically shown on a Fischer.

post #19 of 28
Boot spreader? I don't know about you guys, but I really don't want a boot that has to be cut off me if I have any minor knee or leg injury.
post #20 of 28
Steve,
Try poping the boot buckles loose when you take your skis off. You might find that the little walking you do from the hill to where ever you take the boots off is enough to spread the shell open a bit easing removal. This used to work for me with Langes.
post #21 of 28

The DeBooter is pretty clever (several DeBooter posts now deleted), but basically it's like a western boot horn/yoke. In my case it's not the grip on the boot shell that matters, so the DeBooter solution wouldn't make a difference for me. Even screwing the sole to the floor wouldn't help me get out. In my case my boots are tight and when they're cold the plastic is too stiff to spread the shell wide enough to get the laced-up liner out of the shell (laced onto my feet). I use 2 solutions based on my available time:

 

1. If I have a half hour available, then I wear them into the bar and in two beer's time of being indoors they will come off with little struggle.

2. If I'm in a rush to get going, then I use the hair dryer I keep in my bag, and about 3 minutes of blasting the lower part of the shells with MAX hot air to the front and sides and they will come off with little struggle.

 

Getting the laced-up liners (laced onto my feet) into the shells in the morning is yet another challenge, and I'm now using a device called the "Boot Horn" which is a red piece of plastic with a rope attached to it, and that device makes this a lot easier than silicone and other tricks did for me.

 

http://www.tognar.com/ski-and-snowboard-boot-horn/


Edited by CHRISfromRI - 3/8/16 at 6:42pm
post #22 of 28

The DeBooter is not going to help anyone get out of a stiff boot on a cold day.  The video is nonsense.

post #23 of 28

Did anyone notice that the post before Chris's was 8 years old? :rolleyes

post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Did anyone notice that the post before Chris's was 8 years old? :rolleyes

 

Quick mod note - As CHRISfromRI mentioned, there were a few promotional/spam posts made before his, that he and mtcyclist are referring to that have been deleted. 

post #25 of 28


Obviously a problem that hasn't been completely solved over the intervening years :(

While everyone has their own solution the one that works for me (and not mentioned over the last 8 years)  is simply to hold down the rear of the shell and drive the knee forward pulling foot and liner out together.  Every few times I re-spray the liners (exteriors) with food grade silicon which greatly facilitates their sliding out (and re-inserting in shell).  Works like a charm and liner prevents pain from plastic pinching top of instep as boot comes off.

post #26 of 28

There are a few youtube videos I think that showed that a way to take off a tight boot us seated and a leg crossed over onto your other quad which position that gives you the best mechanical position for your hands to lever or pull on the back of the shell (as jdleuck describes), plus unweights that boot so you can do a plantarflexion plus your leg is supported so you aren't losing energy to keep balance on 1 foot and fight against the pull.  It's a trick that made taking my old boots off easier, and I put it in there with the techniques to putting on your skis in powder on a steep slope or tricks you learn as you ski a lot.

 

If you do have trouble, give this position a try.  Of course if you are not flexible enough to cross your leg, then you need to find something else

 

If your boot doesn't cause you that much trouble though, you don't need these techniques.


Edited by raytseng - 3/9/16 at 10:56pm
post #27 of 28
Sit down and open your boots as far as you can by pressing the tongue out with one hand and opening the boot with your other. Now step back with your foot (your body will twist since you are seated) so that your foot is behind you. Push your hand and pull your foot out.
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

...a way to take off a tight boot us seated and a leg crossed over onto your other quad which position that gives you the best mechanical position for your hands to lever or pull on the back of the shell (as jdleuck describes), plus unweights that boot so you can do a plantarflexion plus your leg is supported so you aren't losing energy to keep balance on 1 foot and fight against the pull...

 

That's how I do it now. 

 

-- Cross legs

-- Pull tongue to the side with one hand (Right hand for right boot, left for left)

-- Push down on the back of the boot with the other (Left hand for right boot, right for left)

 

They tend to come right off.

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