EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Snow Quality vs Terrain Quality
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Snow Quality vs Terrain Quality - Page 3

post #61 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Deep powder on a boring, wide open slope that barely has the grade to allow me to link turns without slowing down too much OR an icy chute/icy steep bump run/icy steep glade?

I'm not interested in steep terrain if it's icy. No icy bumps, no icy chutes, no icy glades, thank you.

I hate expert terrain with bad conditions. I love intermediate terrain covered with untracked powder.
funny, I read that first sentence and expected the rest of your post to go exactly the opposite way. Different strokes, I guess!
post #62 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
Here's another crazy who prefers terrain over snow. Oh wait, there are a whole bunch of them! Actually, it was fun, and I only had a couple of very light rock touches on my skis.(BTW, there was good cover elsewhere on the hill.) Anyone recognize where this is (or want to guess)?


Another example of why I choose terrain--the sketchiness of the snow in this pic seems like it would add to the fun. Throw another 6 feet on there and once it got packed down it would just be another moderately steep run.

Like the years at Mammoth when Hangman's turns into a bowl.
post #63 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Don't know where you might have been, but I'd invite you to come by sometime...I'm sure we've got something that would put your hair on edge.

One of the benefits of maritime snow is that it tends not to stick to steeper terrain than low humidity snow.

We have had a severe shortage of glop this season, though...as it has been snowing heavily for the past month with an average temp of 23o.
I probably shouldn't have been quite so strong in my post. There *is* some good terrain over there. I had a pass at Crystal mountain for a season ( almost 20 years ago) and thought it was pretty good (except for the lack of sunny days), and I skied a lot at the mount hood areas and mt bachelor for a several years ( over 10 years ago ). Most of my comment was directed at those areas. Crystal is better than any of them, IMHO, and *almost* as good as snowbird/alta for terrain. Crystal *can* get powder as good as snowbird/alta but it didn't happen consistently enough. And the lack of sunny days was a negative for me.

I'm glad to hear you're getting some good powder over there. I'm sure there's a lot of good skiing to be had.
post #64 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by cometjo View Post


Another example of why I choose terrain--the sketchiness of the snow in this pic seems like it would add to the fun. Throw another 6 feet on there and once it got packed down it would just be another moderately steep run.
Im one that said conditions over terrain. And I'd ski that run in a heart beat. BUT, I'd stay completely to the extreme right or left side of it where the snow seems somewhat decent.

( personally, I wouldn't call it a moderately steep run, though. There's maybe a couple turns of it that looks like it's somewhat steep, but the run in general looks pretty mellow, IMHO. )
post #65 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by cometjo View Post
Throw another 6 feet on there and once it got packed down it would just be another moderately steep run.
Maybe it's the camera angle, but that is about as steep as our easier blues.

I would ski that in the early season, when the natural obstacles gave it some interest, assuming that more challenging terrain was not available.

The nice thing about living where the snowpack builds from 36" to 360" is that lines that are bland mid-season can be fun early, while lines that are impossible early become skiable later.
post #66 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPowHound View Post
I'm sick of east coast bashers...

That being said, there's also the old saying that if you learn in the East you can ski anywhere in the world, but if you learn in perfect rocky mountain conditions you're going to be on your ass when you hit that bulletproof east coast funk that I have to admit often does rear it's ugly head.
I have never launched any kind of east coast bashing. I have only replied to unsupportable claims laid by east coasters, which seems to happen fairly often as we see here.
post #67 of 73
THe overall slope of the Castlerock area is not that high. It is basically a series of ledges, so the steep parts are only twenty or thirty feet long at a time. (This is not necessarily the hardest part -- it is just where I happened to take a photo. I thought the one skier made a nice composition.)

The mystique is more due to the natural conditions (no grooming, no snowmaking), the separation (it is one chair and a few runs, no interconnect with the rest of the mountain except at the bottom), and the fact that it never used to be open. (The current approach of staying open and letting the buyer beware was a surprise to me -- don't know when the policy changed.)

When there is more snow, the moguls build up nicely. (There is probably a lot more traffic per square foot than on similar terrain out west.)
post #68 of 73
I've been thinking about why there isn't steeper terrain in the East. It is not because nothing is steep here -- on the drive I go by forested hillsides that are steeper than ski runs anywhere. Heck, I drive by cliffs sometimes.

So the limit is on what is chosen to be a ski run. There are probably several reasons: 1. inadequate snow cover, morphing into ice; 2. history - many areas go back to the wooden ski era; 3. self-reinforcing market expectations.

THe number of people on sketchy coverage in my other picture shows that there are a lot of people around here who are hungry for challenging terrain (such as it is). If it was more challenging, would there be more or fewer? Who knows
post #69 of 73

oh my god are you seroius ?

why do we have this stupid east vs. west thing ? come on guys lets be serious here the west has better terrain and better snow...there's not even room for argument...

THE ONLY feature that I can see the east can beat the west is in tree skiing..

sorry westerns, but the east has the best tree skiing hands down. ..

anything else the west is the best..

BACK TO THE SUBJECT..

being from the east, and dealing with shitty conditions all the time (see this week for a prime example) I will take snow quality over terrain anyday of the week..
post #70 of 73
Back to terrain vs conditions...
I ski to have fun, and while I would enjoy being very skilled at it, being constantly challenged isn't fun. That being said, I would pick the conditions over terrain. A perfectly groomed NASTAR course or an undulating blue is a blast, as well as a freshly powdered run.
post #71 of 73




Terrain.
post #72 of 73
luckily I live in Whistler, where the terrain is awesome, so I just want good snow conditions, which we have this season
post #73 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
(The current approach of staying open and letting the buyer beware was a surprise to me -- don't know when the policy changed.)
Disclaimer: I am a Sugarbush employee.

Since Summit Ventures acquired the mountain from ASC they have been fairly aggressive about opening trails. If it's just that the snow is thin or otherwise "bad" it's open. I sometimes think if someone poaches a closed trail they'll open it just to keep off the Herbs who think it's cool to duck a rope. If it's closed here there is a really good reason. This weekend I was skiing with an examiner who has skied everywhere, and works part time at Killington, Stowe, and Sugarbush. Her take is, since conditions are what make expert terrain, without Sugarbush there would be no expert skiing in the east.(Shortly after watching someone slide down a couple hundred vertical feet of ripcord, she said that the day before all of that sort of terrain at Stowe was closed, and after 25 years at Killington she knows it would be closed there too in those conditions.) I know there are those who would include Mad River Glen and Smugglers in the mix but the point stands, conditions determine the level of difficulty.

I agree there are minimum standards for both terrain and conditions, but assuming that, I lean toward "it depends". Are you talking for one run, or for a whole day? Imagine frozen bumps on a constantly changing pitch, or a couple feet of powder on a featureless blue slope. For one run probably the powder, for all day probably the bumps*. I'll definitely go for interesting over featureless terrain given the same conditions on each.



*Then again after a day of skiing it, the blue will have acquired some features.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Snow Quality vs Terrain Quality