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Sharp left heel pain in Nordica Hot Rod Top Fuel

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I have my Nordica Hot Rod Top Fuels almost dialed now after several visits to two different but good bootfitters. I am still having a problem with my left heel. From 6 days of hard skiing two weeks back I have developed a very tender spot just outside of center (like 0.5 to 1 cm) on my left heel, for reference it is just below the top of where my dress shoes would come up to. It is slightly red and i can feel what might be a small nodule or something in there that feels kind of weird to push on but not always painful. This was not here before my most recent ski trip. My right heel is fine thankfully. The heel boxes of these boots are tight, but I believe they are similar to my foot structure. Neither of my heels lift when i am skiing, but the flex the boot allows, especially when warm, seems to aggravate this spot when i flex forward. I skied several days on these boots last spring and earlier this season without pain in this place although i could feel the heel holding me in tightly. But recently though my foot has hurt very sharply for the walk from the car and the first 2-3 runs. Strangely, the pain is completely gone after this as either I get warmed up or the boots do. I have been experiencing some pain walking to work or jogging since then but it is less severe and also goes away shortly. I always store my boots (buckled) in the warm house when not using.

Work done to the boots so far is punch outs for nevicular bones and outside of little toe joints. The last thing I had done was a small grind in the affected heel area. I have custom footbeds molded 10mo ago and I weigh about the same now as then. The fit is about 1 finger. I trust the bootfitters I was going to but sadly will not be able to visit either before my next big trip starting this weekend.

Sorry for running on but trying to give all pertinent details. I have read some great posts on this site but was hoping for a bit of very specific help! Does this sound like I just need a little more punch/grind out if the pressure point, or might there be something significant at work here? I find it unlikely but is there anything I might do myself to make it through 7 days of hard skiing before I can get back to my guy? Also is it significant at all that the pain goes to zero after an excruciating hour or two in the morning?

Many thanks!

edit: btw i am 6'4" 195 lbs, shoe size 12-13, boot size 10, ski pretty aggressively
post #2 of 11
Kokomas... You had mentioned that the flex of the boot...

"Neither of my heels lift when i am skiing, but the flex the boot allows, especially when warm, seems to aggravate this spot when i flex forward."

Either your left leg range of motion at the ankle is smaller than your right or your left foot is larger/differently shaped than your right and causing heel issues. If it is the former, It seems that the attachment point for the achillies is inflamed and ready to build a "bursa" sac filled with calcium rich fluid. This sac (a small shock absorber/friction reliever) will implant the calcium at the attachment point and start building a "pump bump". I would try to stiffen both boots to their maximum and lessen the forward lean of the upper cuff. If the latter, a heel grind @ the sore area might help or changing the bootboard "delta" could be beneficial.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantman View Post
Kokomas... You had mentioned that the flex of the boot...

"Neither of my heels lift when i am skiing, but the flex the boot allows, especially when warm, seems to aggravate this spot when i flex forward."

Either your left leg range of motion at the ankle is smaller than your right or your left foot is larger/differently shaped than your right and causing heel issues. If it is the former, It seems that the attachment point for the achillies is inflamed and ready to build a "bursa" sac filled with calcium rich fluid. This sac (a small shock absorber/friction reliever) will implant the calcium at the attachment point and start building a "pump bump". I would try to stiffen both boots to their maximum and lessen the forward lean of the upper cuff. If the latter, a heel grind @ the sore area might help or changing the bootboard "delta" could be beneficial.
Thanks for your thoughts! I traced my feet on a piece of paper and they are almost exactly the same length from the heel to big toe, if anything the left foot is slightly shorter by a mm or two. the 2-d shape looks comparable except for the 2nd toe on the right foot is decently larger. I guess my heel could still be shaped differently, kind of hard too tell. I also measured my ankle flex by how far i can flex the forefoot off the ground and the left foot was around 1-7/8" and the right foot was about 2-1/8". Is this enough to make a difference? The boots are at their stiffest setting and i have a stiffer front plate mounted on the front flap just outside the tongue on both boots. To my knowledge the more technical settings are just as they were out of the box. There is something called a quick set spoiler velcroed on the rear of both liners. I put the footbeds in the shells and stood in them with both feet. I didn't notice much difference between the two fits, but on the left foot i could feel the pressure point rubbing on the shell when i flexed little bit and especially when i lifted the heel a half inch or so. The right heel rubbed the shell too but perhaps more uniformly across the inside, middle, and outside of the heel instead of just the outside. I am not sure why, but now that I think about it, i've noticed the left boot seems to flex a little more than the right one for no good reason, could this be result of the punches? When it is cold this difference diminishes. I'm not sure if any of this tells you anything more, but i'd love to hear what you think if it does! Just thinking out loud but perhaps the reason the pain goes away after a while is the boots stiffen up in the cold??? It is quite painful walking in them first thing in the morning when they are warm.

Thanks again.
post #4 of 11
Kokomas... How is the shell fit on this boot?
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
if i understand you correctly 1-1.5 fingers i think, thats with my toes barely touching, although its a little hard to reach into the heel box. when i got them and skied a couple days i had pressure points on neviculars and at little toe joints which have been heated and punched pretty significantly by basin ski in killington. have had success with nordica's before, last pair of boots were 01 gp's i think, light green and dark green with red toe patch. did not have heel problems of any kind in those although the shell construction was different. thinking about digging them out to bring as backup on this trip although the shells have softened a lot and creak
post #6 of 11
Kokomas... Check the mm sizing on the side of the heel of both boots. (old and new) See if they are close enough to indicate a similar shell size.
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
i will look. it might have worn off the old ones by now, will do when i get home after work
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
"Either your left leg range of motion at the ankle is smaller than your right or your left foot is larger/differently shaped than your right and causing heel issues. If it is the former, It seems that the attachment point for the achillies is inflamed and ready to build a "bursa" sac filled with calcium rich fluid. This sac (a small shock absorber/friction reliever) will implant the calcium at the attachment point and start building a "pump bump". I would try to stiffen both boots to their maximum and lessen the forward lean of the upper cuff."

looking into Retrocalcaneal Bursitis. it sounds pretty similar to what i am experiencing, especially the recent increase in my activity, potentially tight fitting boots, redness, warmth, small bump, and that it hurts the most when just beginning the activity

i found it here (for others who might be curious):
http://www.emedicine.com/sports/topic114.htm

i guess i am supposed to ice, stretch, rest, take ibuprofen, and correct the boots. i am new to cuff adjustments but will try lessen the forward lean. should i do that on both boots or just the affected one? will grinding the heel help or hurt in conjuction with the cuff adjustment?

thanks,
Pete
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
cantman, my old and and new shells are both bsl 335
post #10 of 11
Quote:
i am new to cuff adjustments but will try lessen the forward lean. should i do that on both boots or just the affected one? will grinding the heel help or hurt in conjuction with the cuff adjustment?
I would remove the shims from both liners and grind the heel of the one boot initially. Ski it that way for a day and see if there are any positive results. Remember, the sore heel may take a while to heal from point tenderness, so give it a chance.
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
thanks a lot, will do. i'm thinking i'll get thin socks instead of the medium ones i've been wearing and perhaps stick one of the dr scholes donut pads on the bump. i guess this increases pressure on the area but with thinner socks maybe it will fit.

I appreciate your help and read up on Retrocalcaneal Bursitis here and tgr. There are lots of threads out there!
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