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Inches or Centimeters - Page 2

Poll Results: Inches or centimeters or both?

Poll expired: Jan 15, 2008  
  • 20% (13)
    Inches
  • 41% (27)
    Centimeters
  • 24% (16)
    Both
  • 13% (9)
    Don't care one little bit as long as there is new snow!
65 Total Votes  
post #31 of 51
I remember being told that US switching to the metric system back in the mid 70's. Then, they started putting MPH and KPH on US car speedometers. I haven't seen a single other indicator since that the US will switch. It won't be until everyone is speakng spanish that it will really change, the big font on packages will be spanish and the little font will be english, same for the road digns and things will be measured metrically. I agree the metric system makes more sense, 0=freezing, 100=boiling, etc.. I heard that the circumference of the earth is a round number in meters (10,000,000....not sure how many zeros).

But, I hope that doesn't happen til I'm dead. I'm too old to adjust to anything but shorter rounder skis and faster chairlifts!, But I do understand some spanish.
post #32 of 51
A metre was set to be a specific, exact, fraction of the distance from somewhere in Paris to one of the North Poles (what a great, specific, yet completely vague explanation I just gave)...

EDIT: Just checked my uni notes, and it is: 1/10,000,000 of the distance from the equator to the North Pole (presumably true north) passing through Paris.

Just to bore you even more with the notes I just checked, it is preserved as the distance between two scratches on a platinum-iridium alloy bar (kept at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Sevres in France).

The modern definition of a metre is, however: the distance travelled by light in 1/299,729,458 of a second :. Sounds such a simple way of measuring things now. Which means that it takes 0.0000000056 seconds for light to get from one end of my pair of skis to the other...
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by skisimon View Post
...
The modern definition of a metre is, however: the distance travelled by light in 1/299,729,458 of a second :. Sounds such a simple way of measuring things now. Which means that it takes 0.0000000056 seconds for light to get from one end of my pair of skis to the other...
hmm....while we're at it, how about metric time? Everything in multiples of 10...
post #34 of 51
Was just thinking of the peculiar way that time works. 60, 60, 24, 7... and then once you get below a second it suddenly becomes 1/10, 1/100, 1/1000... I suppose that ability to measure the accurately reliably came around after many places had gone metric, and seeing the sense of a simple system they went for 1/10 rather than another 1/60.
post #35 of 51
How to go from the interesting topic of snow to maths and physics in a few short posts...
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
Then, they started putting MPH and KPH on US car speedometers.
Yea, when they started doing that, I had a friend that printed up some bumperstickers = "WARP 6 a law we can live with."
post #37 of 51
At Whistler it snows in centimeters. At Baker, 50 miles south, it snows in inches. Baker gets WAAAY more snow than Whistler. I'll take inches, thank you! :
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by skisimon View Post
How to go from the interesting topic of snow to maths and physics in a few short posts...
You could calculate how much longer the life of the average skier is extended due to relativistic time dilation
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by gnjantzie View Post
Let's see: skis and poles are measured in cm and mm, boots use European sizing, and snow can be measured in cm or inches--looks like we're already pretty metric. Just don't mess with vertical feet, it makes me feel I've done much more skiing in a day than if I measure in meters!
Thats a great point!!! everything is measured in metric but then for vert its always Feet whats up with that??!! If its over 6000 vertical FT they should say 2.5 kilometers of Vert? Or what ever that =? Hey GNJantzie hows Lake Louise and Sunshine these days!!weve been getting puked on these days over hear!!: Going out for a few hours tomorrow.
post #40 of 51
I am from PA and am now living in a purely metric country and I cannot, for the life of me, figure out what the temperature is, how far I have to travel, how high I just climbed a mountain. I don't need the US to go completely metric, just have some more of it around so those of us who do travel outside the states can understand what the heck is going on!
post #41 of 51
bgraves, ok a quick lesson:
0C = freezing point of water. (32F)
If the temperature has a - in front of it, it is below freezing.
100C = boiling point of water (212F)
Body temp = 37C
A few temps that are easy to remember:
-40C = -40F
16C = 61F
28C = 82F

Distances (approx):
1ft = 30cm
1 metre = 3ft 3in
1000ft = 305 metres
1600 metres = 1 mile

Dates:
3/1/08 = 3rd of January 2008 (day comes first)
27/03/70 = my birthday.
post #42 of 51
I live in a pure metric country but, since my background is aviation, I got used to feet, inches, knots, mph, gallons (imperial or U.S.), pounds and so on, unit of measurements early enough in my life not to be upset.
Having worked in the HW mainframe business part of the computer world, got used to tool sizes like 5/16 7/32 and so son...
So, either way it's ok to me. I just wish that here could snow more than what it does actually (It's snowing now, btw)
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by skisimon View Post
A metre was set to be a specific, exact, fraction of the distance from somewhere in Paris to one of the North Poles (what a great, specific, yet completely vague explanation I just gave)...

EDIT: Just checked my uni notes, and it is: 1/10,000,000 of the distance from the equator to the North Pole (presumably true north) passing through Paris.

Just to bore you even more with the notes I just checked, it is preserved as the distance between two scratches on a platinum-iridium alloy bar (kept at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Sevres in France).

The modern definition of a metre is, however: the distance travelled by light in 1/299,729,458 of a second :. Sounds such a simple way of measuring things now. Which means that it takes 0.0000000056 seconds for light to get from one end of my pair of skis to the other...
Err, actualy, passing through any point in the northern hemisphere you may fancy...

(And I vote meters of snow !)
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post
And I vote meters of snow !)
Then unfortunately you'd be spelling the name of the unit incorrectly. It is metres as you will see used here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interna...of_Units#Units
post #45 of 51
eh, I was trying to be nice to you, ugly americans...
The correct form being, of course, mètres.
post #46 of 51
They can't spell colour either
post #47 of 51
I don't know how long ago it was in the US but liquor bottles went from fifth gallons and quarts to 750ml and 1000ml and no one complained.

I guess most drinkers just look at the label long enough to recognize the brand and then just say, we'll that one looks big enough.
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post
Err, actualy, passing through any point in the northern hemisphere you may fancy...
I presume that the fact that the Earth is in no way shape or form a uniform shape (be that spherical or otherwise) or symmetrical etc has bypassed the French?

(Don't get me started, this type of thing is right in my academic and professional field, and I could probably, therefore, bore everyone to death on the topic...).
post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post
eh, I was trying to be nice to you, ugly americans...
The correct form being, of course, mètres.
Just checked my uni notes, and it is: 1/10,000,000 of the distance from the equator to the North Pole (presumably true north) passing through Paris.


Blame the French LOL! And, why do you need to have everything end on tre (theatre, metre) or our (flavour) instead of ter (theater) and or (flavor)?
Adding the "u" seems like a waste of ink, paper, moniter ( or monitre?) space!:
post #50 of 51
Monitre... it could catch on.

I'm happy to admit that, with regards to the word's latin root, we're wrong on the aluminium (or should that be aluminum) front, even though -ium is most widely used. It's still funny though when you get an American or Canadian to try and pronounce it... It's as though their mouth suddenly becomes disconntected from their brain.It could have been because we'd asked a teenager working in a sports shop though...
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
bgraves, ok a quick lesson:
0C = freezing point of water. (32F)
If the temperature has a - in front of it, it is below freezing.
100C = boiling point of water (212F)
Body temp = 37C
A few temps that are easy to remember:
-40C = -40F
16C = 61F
28C = 82F

Distances (approx):
1ft = 30cm
1 metre = 3ft 3in
1000ft = 305 metres
1600 metres = 1 mile

Dates:
3/1/08 = 3rd of January 2008 (day comes first)
27/03/70 = my birthday.
Thanks a bunch, that helps a lot.
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