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Placement of bindings?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Well I just bought a pair of 07/08 Volkl Gotamas, they are 183s. I am unsure of where I should get the bindings placed on these skies. I typically Like to stay in the deep stuff and dont intend to uses these on groomers except to get from point to point. Some people have told me to center mount them while others have suggested to mount they 3 cm back from center. I dont know enough about binding placement and am looking for more opinions. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
post #2 of 12
I would recommend following the ski manufacturer's recommended mounting point (probably a center of boot sole mark on the ski). They have done a lot of testing to know where to best mount the boots.

The old rule of thumb was that mounting the boot toe 1 cm forward of the ski's mid-cord mark (1/2 the distance between tip and tail) made the skis easier to turn (for slalom) and 1 cm back of midcord made the skis more stable (for GS & DH). However, this was back in the days when skis measured to your wrist!
post #3 of 12
In general, I would not recommend mounting back of center.

What size are your boot soles? For larger feet, the manufacturer's mark is often fine, since it puts your ball of foot about where you want it. For people like me with small feet, it puts your ball of foot aft of where you want it, in general making the ski sluggish and makes it more difficult to pressure the shovel.

I don't like to disagree with fudman22, but in this case, I do. The mark for the center of the boot sole was done not for performance reasons but for easier/faster mounting. Thus, guys like out own Lou Rosenfeld will do ski balance measurement to determine the most effective mounting point.

Which bindings are you putting on them? You might consider a binding that you can actually move fore and aft depending on conditions and your preference.
post #4 of 12
The general concensus for Gotama's is to mount the boot mark over the 'I' on the sidewall. The lines on the top sheet are notoriously inconsistent but the 'I' on the sidewall is spot on.
post #5 of 12
Pick up some demo bindings. They have the movable toe piece and you can try different settings until you find what you are looking for.

Karl
post #6 of 12
The only challenge with demo bindings is that they often quite a bit heavier, and in all likelihood, that's not what you want on a Gotama...
post #7 of 12
Demo bindings also aren't the most reliable-at least in my experience.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by fudman22 View Post
I would recommend following the ski manufacturer's recommended mounting point (probably a center of boot sole mark on the ski). They have done a lot of testing to know where to best mount the boots.
Keep in mind that mark only makes sense for an average size foot, and may be influenced by the type of skier the manufacturer is trying to cater to. I think it makes sense to research it a little, and at least see where a true BOF mount would be.
post #9 of 12
Shiny side up.
post #10 of 12
FWIW, I'm reasonably convinced that at this point in time, the BoF thing is so much dated mumbo jumbo. Skis are being designed with variable sidecut. They are being designed with different tip/tail proportions. For example - that big front end on the Gotama is no accident. I'm not saying there is never any reason to deviate from the mark - just that I'm not at all convinced that resorting to "BoF" in all instances has any merit.

I have a bunch of days on the gold Gotamas mounted at Volkl's suggested "boot center" mark. The simple answer is that if you do not plan to use them a ton on groomers, stick with that mark - just put a light & low binding on & have fun. If you want to be as paranoid as some of us - make sure the shop doing the mounting has extra great techs & ask them to measure to Volk's spec to double check the marks.

Also - be aware that there is a whole lot of conflicting buzz about mounting the Gotamas. Partly due to changes in how they are marked and partly due to some goofs in marking a year or two ago. And a bit just due to what people prefer.

So, to r e i t e r a t e, don't overthink this one. Get your pretty gold skis w/ the fat happy guys mounted at the suggested "boot center" mark. With the shop double checking by measuring against Volk's specs for the ski, just for paranoia's sake. Then when they get it right, drop a sixer of a fine seasonally themed microbrew on the techs. Then go have fun in the snow. You'll be grinning like the little guys on your skis. All done...
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Get your pretty gold skis w/ the fat happy guys mounted at the suggested "boot center" mark. You'll be grinning like the little guys on your skis. All done...
What happens when the happy little fat guy falls off:
And I'm not talking about me.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
FWIW, I'm reasonably convinced that at this point in time, the BoF thing is so much dated mumbo jumbo. Skis are being designed with variable sidecut. They are being designed with different tip/tail proportions. For example - that big front end on the Gotama is no accident. I'm not saying there is never any reason to deviate from the mark - just that I'm not at all convinced that resorting to "BoF" in all instances has any merit.

I think BOF is actually more important nowadays than it once was -- or at least it's important to put some analysis and thought into determining mount position, whether it's BOF or not, instead of just mounting on "the line". You do need to know something about the tip/waist/tail geometry to do this, and then factor in the desired ski use and skier tastes. This all goes way beyond accepting "the line". Sometimes it can only be done by testing various mount points on the slopes.

I am not sure I believe in the notion of a variable sidecut. As long as there is a single maximum tip dimension, a single minimum waist dimension, and a single maximum tail dimension, with a smooth continuous curve between them, the skis will have a particular radius of curvature and an associated turn center. Until sidecut shape deviates from that, it reduces to a rather simple analysis (there's actually some interesting Calculus behind this). Of course, less deep sidecuts are more versatile in that they can be made to assume a variety of turn shapes, but the edge shape still has one "design" sidecut based on the three dimensions.
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