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Lifespan of a ski?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
What's the lifespan of a pair of modern skis? It's a no-brainer when you take 'em to the tuner and he says there's no edge left to tune - then they become your newest pair of rock skis - but do you think that skis lose some of their "life" in terms of camber, torsional rigidity, flex, etc over time?
post #2 of 16
Each ski will be different. I have some race SL's (Stockli), that are going strong with well over 100 days on them and they do look beat.

Had some "citizen" race Rossi SL, that had two light use seasons and were dead as doorknockers after the second tune.

My guess would be a soft ski seeing hard use would go first.

A race stock seeing "normal" non race use would probably retain camber and have a live core for quite awhile.

Wax and do your own edges and you won't be grinding down good skis.
post #3 of 16
One one hand I have sold a ski after one run, let alone skis that I sold before I even mounted or skied them.

On the other hand, I have the very first new pair of skis I purchased in 1982, they have about 200 days on the and I still can't flex them.
post #4 of 16
my Head World Cup racing prototypes are strong after 6 years! I dont race anymore so hard rec skiing and good snow makes for longer lasting ski as long as they were a good ski to begin with. I agree on stiffer skis lasting longer as long as your not a major bump skiier and your not always getting extreem air with landings below say 55%. K2,Head,volkis,Elan,Rossi they all make great high end skis that will last years or 100,s of days as long as your not totaly beating them. Proper storage is important also!! Stiffer tail med to stiffish toe. I always bought skis that were as mentioned a little stiffer than I could flex out all day kinda like breaking em in. As they loose some flex I could start flexing them because as you get more used to a ski you will improove to the skis capability. Kinda like a bike you will wreck a cheap soft kids bike before you wreck a high end race bike thats made for exrteam abuse.
post #5 of 16
Because I do my own tuning and avoid shop grinds (which can eat away the useful life of a ski if done frequently) I used to wear out skis. Back in the days when I was a poor student and kept skis long enough to wear them out, I could generally tell they were played out when the tails started to get mushy and had no life in them. I had a few pair of skis that did this back in the late 80s and early 90s. I would generally ski about 40 days a year back then and was pretty demanding of my skis. They were usually dead after about 3 seasons. So my guess is 120-150 days for a typical lifetime. I don't have good data on modern skis just because I tend to turn them over (buy/sell) more quickly.
post #6 of 16
1) Buy new ski. Write review on Epic raving about it

2) Manufacturer changes graphics. Everyone in the liftline has the new ones. You start to lose enthusiasm.

3) Attend clinic. Must be the ski, not me.

4) See item #1
post #7 of 16
Skis are generally made to last about 100 days of skiing. For some, that's a decade worth of ski vacations. For some, like my friends and I, that won't make it the whole season!
post #8 of 16
100 days! crap... my new skis are 1/4 done already
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
Because I do my own tuning and avoid shop grinds (which can eat away the useful life of a ski if done frequently) I used to wear out skis. Back in the days when I was a poor student and kept skis long enough to wear them out, I could generally tell they were played out when the tails started to get mushy and had no life in them. I had a few pair of skis that did this back in the late 80s and early 90s. I would generally ski about 40 days a year back then and was pretty demanding of my skis. They were usually dead after about 3 seasons. So my guess is 120-150 days for a typical lifetime. I don't have good data on modern skis just because I tend to turn them over (buy/sell) more quickly.
Where does one learn to do his own tuning? Not that I am looking to start a new job, just that it would be expiedient for me living a couple hundred miles from a ski shop. Being a millwright by trade I cannot imagine that I couldnt learn.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
100 days! crap... my new skis are 1/4 done already
So you have skied 25 days on them? : Dude, I have destroyed a new pair of skis in ONE RUN before! It's a general reference only.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
1) Buy new ski. Write review on Epic raving about it

2) Manufacturer changes graphics. Everyone in the liftline has the new ones. You start to lose enthusiasm.

3) Attend clinic. Must be the ski, not me.

4) See item #1
Post of the year.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by spud6414 View Post
Where does one learn to do his own tuning? Not that I am looking to start a new job, just that it would be expiedient for me living a couple hundred miles from a ski shop. Being a millwright by trade I cannot imagine that I couldnt learn.
http://www.swixschool.no/web/index2.html
http://www.alpineskituning.com/

Also order a Tognar catalog (www.tognar.com). There's tons of tuning info in there and you will be ready to spend at least $1000 by the time you're done reading it.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by spud6414 View Post
Where does one learn to do his own tuning? Not that I am looking to start a new job, just that it would be expiedient for me living a couple hundred miles from a ski shop. Being a millwright by trade I cannot imagine that I couldnt learn.
You can learn a lot hanging around here. I watched a Warren Miller "learn to ski better" video many years ago with college roommates; they focused on the ski tips, but I got a lot out of the section on basic tuning, and that got me started. Your background will definitely help -- I found that my background growing up around a carpentry and machine shop certainly helped when I began working on skis and using/maintaining ski tools.

If you start with skis that have a good tune -- and that means flat bases and the proper side and base edge angles, you can maintain that tune for a long time quite easily. New skis generally fit into this category, but not always. I normally tune my skis every 3-4 days of skiing, and this consists of using diamond stones and guides to sharpen the edges to the right angles, and then waxing the bases (preceded by p-tex repair if needed, which is rare around here). That level of tuning is quite simple and wouldn't take much investment. You could actually go with a starter kit like this for about $100:

http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=T4BTK004

Or contact Terry at slidewright (Alpinord here on Epic) for recommendations on what to buy if you assemble a piecemeal kit. I am sure he would be glad to help you out with recommendations.
post #14 of 16
I've skied for 30 years, and have one pair of skis that was purchased in 1983 with easily 300 full days use. I've also torn up skis in a month or a week, broken, seperated edges, or just plain worn then out.

Ski life depends 60% on how the bases are maintianed (item A). Lots of beltsanding and stone grinding will eat away your edges within about 75 days. On the other hand, you can take a pair of old boards that haven't been tuned much at all, fill in the gouges, and make them flat as new again. Lightly filing them daily by hand is usually OK.

Ski life depents 20 % on how they are skied (item B). Lots of bumps, racing ruts, chatter, or air will kill the tortion of boards within a month. On the other hand, skiing recreationally on blues and some blacks a ski could last a decade depending on item A and item C.

Ski life depends on 20% the weight of the skier (item C). Don't make me explain the physics here!

Ski life also depends on quality, you get what you pay for usually.

One more consideration, plastic is an oil byproduct and like rubber it can degrade over time. They now recommend that you replace tires over 10 years old regardless of tread life. Same holds true for old skis, don't ever ski old skis without bringing an extra pair along.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post
http://www.swixschool.no/web/index2.html
http://www.alpineskituning.com/

Also order a Tognar catalog (www.tognar.com). There's tons of tuning info in there and you will be ready to spend at least $1000 by the time you're done reading it.

Well I doubt I will have too. Hey thanks for the links.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
You can learn a lot hanging around here. I watched a Warren Miller "learn to ski better" video many years ago with college roommates; they focused on the ski tips, but I got a lot out of the section on basic tuning, and that got me started. Your background will definitely help -- I found that my background growing up around a carpentry and machine shop certainly helped when I began working on skis and using/maintaining ski tools.

If you start with skis that have a good tune -- and that means flat bases and the proper side and base edge angles, you can maintain that tune for a long time quite easily. New skis generally fit into this category, but not always. I normally tune my skis every 3-4 days of skiing, and this consists of using diamond stones and guides to sharpen the edges to the right angles, and then waxing the bases (preceded by p-tex repair if needed, which is rare around here). That level of tuning is quite simple and wouldn't take much investment. You could actually go with a starter kit like this for about $100:

http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=T4BTK004

Or contact Terry at slidewright (Alpinord here on Epic) for recommendations on what to buy if you assemble a piecemeal kit. I am sure he would be glad to help you out with recommendations.
I thank you, I am going to learn this.
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