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Brits skiing in US

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm hoping that some of our British friends are willing to share some info about their ski trips to the US. When, where, for how long, tour agency? or other travel pro?

How was the experience? Worth it? What you expected? Have you skied in Europe before skiing in US?

What's your dream ski trip?

Thanks in advance for your posts. We're anxious to hear from you.

R
post #2 of 26
You may also want to take a look over on snowHeads, since there are a lot of Brits contributing there.
post #3 of 26
It'd be interesting to hear. We get TONS of UK people here. I taught UK people all day! There's even a big English pub in town...
post #4 of 26
It's the truth! I've taught a number of Brits here on holiday, and I've met even more. When I was taking my Level I evaluation at Killington, two busloads arrived and planted the Union Jack at the base of the hill!

There also appears to be a number of Brits on the slopes who live and work in the USA or Canada.

[ March 08, 2004, 07:53 PM: Message edited by: oboe ]
post #5 of 26
Ant said;
Quote:
We get TONS of UK people here. I taught UK people all day! There's even a big English pub in town...
And oboe added
Quote:
I've taught a number of Brits here on holiday, and I've met even more. When I was taking my Level I evaluation at Killington, tow busloads arrived and planted the Union Jack at the base of the hill!

There also appears to be a number of Brits on the slopes who live and work in the USA or Canada.
Well there goes the neighbourhood! Next thing there will be chip butties and pints of lager on sale in the day lodges.
post #6 of 26
As long as packs of them don't get drunk and puke all over Stowe's streets (as I witnessed in Kitzb├╝hel last year), I have no problem with the invading hordes.
post #7 of 26
Cider can be alcohol free too! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #8 of 26
Yeah, and then it's called apple juice except in the USA [img]tongue.gif[/img]

Quote:
Originally posted by jamesdeluxe:
... all over Stowe's streets (as I witnessed in Kitzb├╝hel last year)
Are you superman in disguise James? [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #9 of 26
Yes, I am both omnipresent and omnipotent.
post #10 of 26
ahr ahr ahr
Why not Cider, fish and chips too?
(I like those, BTW)
post #11 of 26
RJR seriously, ssh is pointing you in the right direction, snowheads is where a lot of europeans (allright mostly britons, but me ain't no brit, so I say europeans) share their views.
post #12 of 26
Right, here is a story from a Brit, but not really because I am Scots and for those who dont know that is not the same as a Brit, which tends to link us to the English- a fine people in many ways but just not my people if you get my drift? Likewise I am not Irish, although many from the US think I sound like one...not sure why.

I have skied in the US in California and Idaho and in Canada at Whistler.

I tend to do the arrangements all myself on the net. No need to involve anyone else.

Reasons for going to the US/Canada are nice people, good snow, good accomodation, if you have kids as I do conversing in the same language is a bonus, good food (usually off the mountain)and a lot of off mountain stuff to do. Yes it is a long flight but if you have travelled a lot- as in fact I have- it is not that bad. Also you have different "high seasons" to Europe especially at Easter time when we can get decent bargains on flights and because Americans are thinking about golf by then, as opposed to skiing, cheap lodging. Europe is then full of "Brits" taking their Easter vacation.

Also going to the States you can combine two holidays in one eg Southern Californian sunshine with Tahoe skiing or a stop off in Florida on the way home from Idaho.We Scots have no problem with a 2 week Easter vacation for some sun and skiing !!

Plus the present exchange rate makes it a steal to come over. Every travel piece in the press over here recently is suggesting take a trip to the States, do some shopping and come back having saved more than your holiday costs in what you saved on what you bought. Not good for the US traveller coming to Europe but great for us.

I have had great times skiing in Europe and I still do that, but I am equally happy going to the US/Canada. The main downsides of Stateside skiing are (1) seriously expensive lift tickets, made only marginally more bearable by the good exchange rate. Canada is a lot better that the US in this area and (2)on mountain food. Go to the Alps and eat there. Then go to your local on mountain eaterie. If they can do it in the Alps why cant they do it at a ski area near you? I would except from this Sun Valley in Idaho which has on mountain facilities you would not believe.Other places can provide ok stuff to pretty poor stuff, but why is it not great stuff? Dont you deserve it?
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by colin:
Right, here is a story from a Brit, but not really because I am Scots and for those who dont know that is not the same as a Brit,
British passport, right? Not a Brit? HAh!
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Well there goes the neighbourhood! Next thing there will be chip butties and pints of lager on sale in the day lodges.
Hey Gerathlete. That's a bit rich coming from and Ausie! A nation that has more of it's people in other countries than it does at home. A nation responsible for Castlemaine XXXX -some of the worst larger in the world. A nation who think they are in the third world if they can't find vegimite (another dodgy export) to go on their wallaby and a pint of VB (another iffy brew) to wash it down with. At least we're civilised and drink our beer out of glasses not 'tinnies'!

Anyway..back to the thread. Skiing in the US is fantastic, have visited Washington state, Wyoming and Utah skied several areas. Just can't get my head round the apres thing. We tend to ski until last lift, therefore missing the wave on the apres beer, and the meal and most signs of life afer skiing! At least that was the experience in JH a few weeks back. Weren't even any Ausies propping up the bar at last call.
post #15 of 26
Sorry...Got to stick up for the Northern English again if people are going to take cheap shots like that Colin -you can't lump us all in with the southerners!.

Quote:
The main downsides of Stateside skiing are (1) seriously expensive lift tickets, made only marginally more bearable by the good exchange rate. Canada is a lot better that the US in this area and (2)on mountain food.
So my repost! Spoken like a true Jock. Too worried about his purse and his belly to fully apreciate the skiing. And that's given the current exchange rate. The only reason I can think a Jock would raise these as objections about the US is that the prices are so favourable that he's nothing to moan about on the lifts in the afternoon!

Just lampooning mate. Most of your contributions are good. Suppose you can't help where you were born!
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Matteo:
Nettie, in Italy Brit=English.
It'a mistake on our part of course. Nevertheless, everyone coming from Great Britain
(and sometimes Ireland too) is referred to as "Inglese".
Matteo, apologise to the Scots!

The British Isles is a geographic entity, England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Ireland, Wales, Isle of Man, often erroneously includes the Channel Isles.

British Islands is a political entity for all British inhabitants of British Isles plus Channel Islands (Jersey, Geurnsey, Alderney, Sark).

Great Britain another geographic entity, the mainland comprising England, Scotland and Wales.

We have England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Isle of Man, Channel Isles (and historically Duchy of Cornwall) combined as the political entity (now devolving) United Kingdom (united my foot)

Each of England, Scotland and Wales includes various smaller islands as well as parts of mainland Great Britain but common usage has led to the term Great Britain being used to describe these three countries (and even the whole of the UK (which includes Northern Ireland) in the Olympics).

The word Britain has also come to be an alias for the UK and the terms British, Briton and Brit have been derived to denote its inhabitants.

I am English and have to put British on my passport as Nationality.

On the internet I have to say my country is UK (it's not a country) except for a tiny minority of sites; England is not an option.

Calling a Scot a Brit is not quite like the Canadians being called American.

In Florida my accent gets mistaken as Australian (and the Aussie standing next to me gets mistaken as English)

edited to add: Sorry, I like VB (as a lager) but prefer REAL ALE not the bright, micro-breweried North American offerings.

[ March 10, 2004, 10:29 AM: Message edited by: Nettie ]
post #17 of 26
Nettie
That post must have cleared it up for everyone [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
I'm Welsh, and therefore British, but not English - thank God

Anyway, coming back to skiing in the US, I'm there from 24th March. Two of my mates have pulled out, so I'm left with the company of a couple of beginners. So, if anyone fancies showing a Welshman around Breckenridge (or any of the other Vail resorts for that matter), I'd really appreciate it.
SP
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Snowplougher:
Welsh, and therefore British, but not English - thank God
Makes two of us praying, then

Bummer, have those two slots gone? I should have been at Copper but circumstances dictate sunny Peterborough. Have tons of fun and try to see Leon at the Blue Spruce in Dillon. Say hi to him for me if you do.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Bummer, have those two slots gone?
We've got plenty of spare beds in our condos now, but not entirely sure about where we stand with the management/travel company about allowing other people to stay.
post #20 of 26
Let me know, I'm bored. I have to be back for 1 April to go to Cesano.
BTW I'm middleaged, and overweight completely due to lack of skiing!
post #21 of 26
Why the lousy food at US ski resort on-mountain eating establishments?
My answer: It's not always lousy. Some of the higher class (and higher priced) resorts such as Deer Valley, Vail, Sun Valley, etc. put out some great food. BUT usually, at most resorts it IS lousy and expensive. I think the reason may be one of priorities. We Americans usually show up at a ski area, pay the big lift ticket fee, then plan to ski hard all day long to get our money's worth. Fine dining is not part of our on-slope plans for the day, in fact you might be admired as a truly avid skier or boarder if you skip lunch altogether or just bring a brown bag of light food from home to munch on a chairlift ride. After the ski day is done we may be more likely to look for a nice restaurant. Then we (the over 35 crowd) often forego the party scene and go to sleep early due to the exertion of skiing hard all day.
We probably sound like a boring bunch to Euros, but there are pros and cons to everything. If our lift tickets were half as expensive, like they often are in the Alps, maybe we'd take a more leisurely approach.
post #22 of 26
I'm off to the US (Breckenridge) for the first time in a couple of weeks. Its a 10 day trip booked through the Inghams travel company.
I've been to Whistler once, but otherwise always skied in the Alps.
I'm looking forward to skiing somewhere different and to a different atmosphere round the town, and to the 'legendary' Colorado powder - I don't know if this is true, or just good old American marketing! I'm also expecting great service everywhere I go (or at least much better than in France).
I'm sure It will be great and well worth it, but I'll let you know when I get back
SP
post #23 of 26
Nettie, in Italy Brit=English.
It'a mistake on our part of course. Nevertheless, everyone coming from Great Britain
(and sometimes Ireland too) is referred to as "Inglese".
post #24 of 26
Freshtracks said:
Quote:
Hey Gerathlete. That's a bit rich coming from and Ausie! A nation that has more of it's people in other countries than it does at home. A nation responsible for Castlemaine XXXX -some of the worst larger in the world. A nation who think they are in the third world if they can't find vegimite (another dodgy export) to go on their wallaby and a pint of VB (another iffy brew) to wash it down with. At least we're civilised and drink our beer out of glasses not 'tinnies'!

Anyway..back to the thread. Skiing in the US is fantastic, have visited Washington state, Wyoming and Utah skied several areas. Just can't get my head round the apres thing. We tend to ski until last lift, therefore missing the wave on the apres beer, and the meal and most signs of life afer skiing! At least that was the experience in JH a few weeks back. Weren't even any Ausies propping up the bar at last call.
Hey c,mon guy it was a joke! Should have known better...sheesh! And this from a Mancurian! :

We were also at JH for several weeks in February and found several good bars (Cascade, Alpenhof) but also found they were really quiet after about 5.30. BTW Hated the Mangy Moose-dirty and noisy. :
post #25 of 26
jamesj said:
Quote:
Some of the higher class (and higher priced) resorts such as Deer Valley, Vail, Sun Valley, etc. put out some great food.
I agree. We found a great lunch place at Alta called (I think) the Collins Restaurant in Watson Shelter mid-mountain. Tablecloths, silver service and good food at very reasonable prices. Pity it doesn't happen more often.
post #26 of 26
No offence taken ger. It was just too hard to resit having a pop back at ya cobber.

Sounds lie you were on a similar trip to the states as us. We did JH -Utah -JH. Very surprised to find the night life in Park City much better than that in JH. Can't say I agree with you on the Moose though. Has to be one of the best apres beers around.
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