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goggle cleaning

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I have a pair of goggles that have an anti-fog coating on the inside. The mfr says not to wipe to clean, just blot dry if they get wet. How do I clean them? They have a few smudges, but I don't want to ruin an expensive goggle.
Thanks!
post #2 of 14
I use cat crap to clean mine.
post #3 of 14
Ullr is full of crap! Weasel crap works way better followed by Yak dung.

Albany has lots of weasels but Yaks are hard to come by in those parts.

Just to let you know, "Cat Crap", is a brand name of defog stuff that comes in a little can like chaw tobacco.

:
post #4 of 14
i know this has nothing 2 do with cleaning, but i just got these new Anon goggles and they come with a few lenses for different light and i have no clue as to how to change the lenses.

anyone know? cause i really dont feel like breaking a brand new pair of goggles
post #5 of 14
Looks like you peel the frame back to remove and replace.
post #6 of 14
Each goggle will have little tricks to changing the lens out. Best thing you can do is ask the shop where you bought them to show you. There will be a little notch or groove and knowing the sequence of where to start out will help.

Warm is better; the plastic of the frame will be more pliablle.
post #7 of 14
thnx evry1
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B. View Post
I have a pair of goggles that have an anti-fog coating on the inside. The mfr says not to wipe to clean, just blot dry if they get wet. How do I clean them? They have a few smudges, but I don't want to ruin an expensive goggle.
Thanks!
Start with just plain water and see if they go away. If not then you may want to try a very mild household cleaner (maybe even check with the goggle company if they have a brand recommendation) or some try the lense cleaner for cameras, etc. that usually is an alcohol based cleaner.

Another option is the soft camera cleaning clothe sold in higher end camera stores.
post #9 of 14
Don't go by me, but once there's smudges, I use the cloth that came with the goggle to try and rub them off. If the anti-fog coating stops working, then I use those fog cloths. I've never had a manufacturer "anti-fog" last very long and I DO make an effort to protect the goggle when storing it.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by RShea View Post
Start with just plain water and see if they go away. If not then you may want to try a very mild household cleaner (maybe even check with the goggle company if they have a brand recommendation) or some try the lense cleaner for cameras, etc. that usually is an alcohol based cleaner.
That's just asking for trouble. Water, household cleaners, ANYTHING with alcohol - they can all wreck the coating.

Email the customer service department and ask them. They are the experts. To date (and having worked in the optical industry for 6 years...) I have yet to find anything that works well. Everything I've ever tried has affected the coating.
post #11 of 14
If the goggles are Oakleys, I'd recommend only cleaning the outside of the lens. The inside with the anti-fog coating is extremely delicate on the Oakleys & you'll most likely ruin the lense if you attempt to clean. The anti-fog coating on the Oakleys will separate from the lens if rubbed when wet. If you must clean, then do it when it's dry & the coating is hard.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard View Post
If the goggles are Oakleys, I'd recommend only cleaning the outside of the lens. The inside with the anti-fog coating is extremely delicate on the Oakleys & you'll most likely ruin the lense if you attempt to clean. The anti-fog coating on the Oakleys will separate from the lens if rubbed when wet. If you must clean, then do it when it's dry & the coating is hard.
Yep - that's really the ONLY "safe" way. And even then...
post #13 of 14
Hmm, water soluable AF coatings don't sound to good, bit like those single use aeroplane tires....
post #14 of 14
Do NOT use any alcohol based cleaners. Anyone trying 409 and these type counter cleaners instead of ammonia based like windex will often learn the differance. These cleaners can leave nearly permament water marks on them. I've done this on large windows and had to call a professional service to clean them.

I have always used any camera lens cleaner on all optics. They are also chemically/optically multicoated and exposed to the elements to need cleaning often. These solutions are not expensive and there are several brands available in most camera and discount stores. Microfiber cloths work well. Many lens cleaners come with a small cloth as well.

Just do not spray onto the lens surface. Apply to the cloth liberally and then apply to the lens.

Tom
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