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Trying to get better at bumps - need help

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I've been really trying to push my limits lately to become a better bump skier. Last week I went down a black diamond with ginormous bumps. Not the best of ideas cause I got rocked, lol. One of my biggest problems is I pick up my inside ski off of the snow thinking that I can get it around quicker to turn which causes me to catch an edge on my other ski and makes me to pick up speed across the mtn and lose control. I obviously know I do it, but can't stop it. Is there anything I can do/think about to help prevent me from doing this? Thanks.
post #2 of 20
One of the best advice I heard this season is: "Don't think about what NOT to do, focus on what you NEED to do".

How about a bump clinic to pick up the correct movements that you can focus on doing, instead of worrying about NOT picking up your inside ski?

One thing that come to mind, is move both feets together instead of one at a time, a mini-jump instead of a sideway step?
post #3 of 20
thaar,

Picking up the inside ski is a symptom of not releasing your edge(s) from the previous turn. Learning pivot slips is a great way to learn the release and then use leg rotation to turn your skis into the next turn (bump). at nyc has good advise about a bump clinic or even a bump focused lesson or three.

RW
post #4 of 20
Thaar,

Pivot slips can help a lot and a bump lesson may solve all your problems. However, the problem with picking up your inside ski in the bumps is that this is an indicator of potential issues that need to be worked on outside of the bumps. If you can make tight quick short radius turns on a groomed slope with a fore/aft centered stance, then you should be able to take those turns into the bumps and easily add movements for absorption and extension. If not, you may need to do a fair bit of work on your skiing before you're ready to stay in control in the bumps.
post #5 of 20
I just read a cool feature in SKI with Bob Barnes @ Winter Park/Mary Jane. He's an Epic regular and also the "Guru" of Bumps. He runs a clinic on bumps that the author made sound really cool. after a week the author was "ripping" the blacks with a fair amount of ease. While not a huge fan of bumps the article made me put the concept of taking a few days out of the season for such a clinic as it would only improve my other skills.

something to consider...
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
I just read a cool feature in SKI with Bob Barnes @ Winter Park/Mary Jane. He's an Epic regular and also the "Guru" of Bumps. He runs a clinic on bumps that the author made sound really cool. after a week the author was "ripping" the blacks with a fair amount of ease. While not a huge fan of bumps the article made me put the concept of taking a few days out of the season for such a clinic as it would only improve my other skills.

something to consider...
wrong bob barnes. i don't believe the winter park bob barnes has ever posted here. it's a common error.

either guy gives a great bump lesson.

the "winter park" bob barnes is a former national demo team member and a very good teacher. he has a variety of things that he does in bumps that are quite unique. his bump camp/clinic is very good

having said this i can name a fairly long list of instructors on the private lesson team who teach at "the jane" and who can help you with your bump skiing. all are full cert instructors and/or trainers, staff trainers, examiners

in no particular order

todd metz
jenn metz
jim shaw
tom hickock
tony terreri
chris mcearny
jt
chris koch
dave taylor

i have skiied with and/or cliniced with all of the above. they are all very good skiers and teachers. i trust todd metz to instruct my daughter. he has done a great job. last spring i took up telemark and jim shaw is my teacher. he is the only person on our staff who is an examiner in two disciplines. dave taylor is a new zealand demo team member.

out of the group lesson pod there are daily bump lessons taught by very good full certs. there are half day and full day options.

the danger in making a list is that i leave off a well qualified pro and or a friend! if i did i'll buy them a beer.:
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
I actually read that article last week and tried to take some of those tips to the mountain. I would love to take his bump clinic, but two things stop me from taking it in January, 1) I don't really have $330 2) I'm not necessarily sure I'm in shape enough to ski nothing but bumps for 2 straight days, lol.

Thanks for the feedback guys. I will be taking some lessons to get better. It's tough sometimes when you go up with friends though, so I have them throw me down tough bump runs to get better.
post #8 of 20
You aren't going to learn how to do anything useful by skiing big steep bumps. Master the small ones first, this may involve some training on the easy groomers.
post #9 of 20
yup - me too. That Bob Barnes article had me thinking the same way - AFAIC $330 is a small price to pay for learning from the master of bumps!
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
I just read a cool feature in SKI with Bob Barnes @ Winter Park/Mary Jane. He's an Epic regular and also the "Guru" of Bumps. He runs a clinic on bumps that the author made sound really cool. after a week the author was "ripping" the blacks with a fair amount of ease. While not a huge fan of bumps the article made me put the concept of taking a few days out of the season for such a clinic as it would only improve my other skills.

something to consider...
What skis is he on? Soli 1080?

While I'm not at the level of Mr. Barnes most likely, I would suggest 'driving' your knees together. Personally I've found a wider stance isn't good for bumps and tends to make one want to lift a ski.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MilesB View Post
You aren't going to learn how to do anything useful by skiing big steep bumps. Master the small ones first, this may involve some training on the easy groomers.
Actually, he might. It depends on whether the problems are psychological or technical.

One of the biggest breakthroughs I ever had was skiing bumps that were way too hard for me. I fell on every single bump. When I came into the lodge at the bottom, a dude sitting in the window said simply "Nice run" (with heavy sarcasm). But after that all the other trails that had been giving me trouble were easy.

I'm a strong believer in using a mix of terrain that is too hard, too easy, and just right. (Within safety considerations, of course.) And it has to be your informed decision to be there, not just "follow me."
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by thaar View Post
I've been really trying to push my limits lately to become a better bump skier. Last week I went down a black diamond with ginormous bumps. Not the best of ideas cause I got rocked, lol. One of my biggest problems is I pick up my inside ski off of the snow thinking that I can get it around quicker to turn which causes me to catch an edge on my other ski and makes me to pick up speed across the mtn and lose control. I obviously know I do it, but can't stop it. Is there anything I can do/think about to help prevent me from doing this? Thanks.
Great advice in this thread so far...

That said, this is almost certainly a result of the progression of edging you use in your skiing, and they way you release (or, more likely, don't release) your old outside ski into the new turn. When you stay on the inside edge of that old outside ski too long, and don't tip it into the new turn, you're stuck having to lift it later to "catch up."

My recommendation: get onto gentle groomed terrain and play with your transitions, moving smoothly from one turn to the next, releasing that old outside ski, feeling yourself move downhill smoothly and without any extraneous movements.

Then, take this to gentle bumps and maintain that technique. Over time, you'll discover that it applies in the gnarliest bumps you care to find. The hard part is sticking to it!
post #13 of 20
Here is an excellent exercise for what you want to accomplish. Note that it's being in balance fore/aft and tipping the inside ski that allows the skis to turn downhill, not any turning effort on your part. What this does in bumps is keeps you balanced and not rushing the start to the turns. Master it on the groomers.
post #14 of 20
waitaminute. I thought tipping the ski was the problem ... hmm, conflicting advice again! Confused
post #15 of 20
Three things kill a skier in bumps--
--Sitting back on their heels
--Rotating the outside of the body toward the hill
--Leaning back toward the hill for that false sense of security.

Try this---
1--Learn to absorb. Learn to bring your knees up to your chest as your feet go up an incline (bump crest, groomer ridge in the snow, washboard trail, etc), and as you go down the other side simultaneously extend and pull both feet back strongly. Rule of thumb--if your ski tips aren't on the snow (and with forward pressure), you have no chance of control. As you reach the crest of a bump, absorb deeply to control the shock, then as you slide over the crest extend with both feet close and strongly pulled back behind your hips to get those ski tips working on the snow.
2--Learn to ski across the back of the bump just like it was any other steep surface (and some can't be skied across, so don't get into those in the first place). Control your speed by the angle you go downhill. I use a carving motion, but let the edges slip to scrub speed off. I tip my inside foot to angle and tip more and tip more as I ski across that bump.
3--Keep your head and shoulders downhill while you keep your hips toward uphill and across your skis for balance. Smooth balance, not with the butt pushed out.
4--Keep your inside arm and shoulder forward and high, high!
5--Keep your outside arm and shoulder low and back. So far back that the pole is ready to plant before your skis reach the fall line, and the pole never passes the fall line even after your skis have passed. You're ready to turn again on any bump that looks good to you.
6--Keep your vision on the next bump or maybe the one after that. Turn on any that looks good to turn on.

Practice on steep groomers. Develop a bullet-proof short turn. You need this before you'll do well in bumps. Get rid of that inside ski pick-up on the steep groomers before you take it into the bumps. For you, drill with equal weight on both feet, then when you're able to make very short radius turns equally weighted, begin lightening the inside foot, but never get to the point where the inside foot is off the snow (that's another drill, but not for you).

Quote:
waitaminute. I thought tipping the ski was the problem ... hmm, conflicting advice again! Confused
It's all about how to tip and when to tip.
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
It's all about how to tip and when to tip.
After the lesson and alot!



For a little less than $330, you can buy Dan Dipiro's book (maybe he'll chime in...)

http://www.mogulskiing.blogspot.com/
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ct55 View Post
waitaminute. I thought tipping the ski was the problem ... hmm, conflicting advice again! Confused
Not conflicting at all, actually.

It's about releasing the ski by tipping down the hill. The advice is actually complementary.
post #18 of 20
Dan's book is quite good, and helped me understand the mechanics better than anything else I have heard or read.
post #19 of 20
2 Bob Barnes?!

Both instructors?!

Both working in Colo?!

What're the odds!?

Sorry for any confusion, though regardless of the Bob, that bump program at Mary J sounds good.
post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the advice guys. I will be heading up sometime next week. We'll see how I do. Hope everyone had a great holiday and Happy New Year.
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