New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shin/Boot Bang

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Long time lurker, first time poster.

I am completely frustrated. I am suffering from shin bang. My story is that I bought new boots last Feb. b/c I had older ones that had packed out and were hurting me b/c of all the room in them.

I now have the new Nordica Speedmachine 12s (I'm 6'-5", 215, expert skier).
They fit great, in all other aspects, except no matter what fix I try, I cannot get rid of the shin bang. I was hopeful that rest during the summer would help a lot, and I even bought the Eliminator Pad to use this year. I also have a SuperFeet Green Insole.

I've been out 5 times, and the shin bang has come back :
I consciously ski out of the back seat, I tighten my boots so there's no room for the shin to slam up against my tongue (or the pad) but with no success in remedying the problem. Do I maybe tighten them too much? (I usually tighten them to the point of being uncomfortable after a run).

The soreness is in my lower shin, just above where the ankles are, but in the front obviously.
I have also tried heel lifts (last year) but found the ones I had uncomfortable.

I have no idea what to do....I feel that if I go to a boot place like Surefoot, they'll sell me on a strategy that won't work and I'll be out 200 bucks. Do they guarantee their work?
Any thoughts on what I can do? Are my boots too stiff?
Also, what can I do during the week to help cure the soreness that I feel for 2-3 days after I ski?

I would be eternally grateful!
PK :
post #2 of 17
the point that is sore, is it on the flexion point (ankle vs shin)? If you raise your toes up does that point raise up more?

can you bridge over the sore point. Pad on both sides of the tendon, and see if that feels better.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the response.
It feels as if the shin bone, just to the side of the tendon that moves outward when I move my toes, is what is sore...not the tendon. It's about 2" above the ankles.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
I guess one other question would be re: the forward adjustment of my boot. I do notice that I have to be pretty vigilant about getting out of the back seat...they seem to naturally put me there..thoughts?
post #5 of 17
can you bridge over the pressure point? (tendon or not)

play with the F lean of the boots, both more and less. Sometimes if you push someone forward the tibia goes forward, but the feamer and hips counter act that by moving even further back.
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hey....sorry, don't know what you mean by bridging across the point.

Also, how do I adjust the F lean? I'm really not skilled at dialing in my boots.

Thank you very much.
post #7 of 17
PaliKona,

If you are constantly fighting to stay forward there is something else going on too! Your discomfort could be the muscle you are using to constantly pull yourself forward is getting overworked?

What bindings are you using? How long is your boot sole (in mm., located near the heel of your boot sole)?

A longer boot sole with a flatter binding like an Atomic or Salomon could be a cause of your back seated bias. Perhaps an increase in this delta angle would help. To experiment, place a 3mm bontex shim between your heel and where it rests on your binding. Then go ski and see if this makes things better? If it does you may want to put a lifter plate on your boot heel.

What was uncomfortable about the heel lift inside your boot and how big was the lift? 1/4" is probably enough in many cases.

let us know?
bud
post #8 of 17
what bud said too:

you add padding (camping mat foam) around the sore spot, but not on the sore spot. So you have more pressure around it and nothing on it.

make a donut around the sore spot
post #9 of 17
So now we get down to where not all boot setup is science. I'll say that I think the original idea of lifting your heel may have made the problem worse as it would have reduced tongue pressure on the top of your shin and increased it down lower.

Mtnlion's idea about padding is correct. Put pads immediately above the sore spot (not on, but close) to reduce pressure on the spot.

I think Bud's mention of working to stay forward may be correct but I'm not certain if you meant in your post that you are conscious of being in the correct position or that you must work to maintain the correct position. I'll assume both as I'm not certain you would focus on it so much if it weren't a problem.

I agree with Bud that increasing binding delta may help, but I'll also throw out that decreasing it may help also. Some skiers react to too much delta by sitting back. Which of course then results in a struggle to get forward.

Without more information on your complete setup it is difficult sometimes. Fortunately playing with delta is fairly easy and you can learn quite a bit very quickly.

Lou
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
hmmm lots to digest.
I'm not struggling to stay out of the backseat, but occasionally notice on hard trails that I do have to, and I don't think it's from fear or apprehention regarding the terrain.
my setup is: Nordica Hot Rods with the XBS ALU Piston Control (Marker). My boots are 28.5mm long, I believe.
So I'm not positive how to go about adding the padding....how should i attach it to the boot tongue? i should use a camping pad and cut it so it's the shape of the tongue, with a hole where my soreness is?
many thanks
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
i think the lift was more like 1/2"....so maybe too much. I'll look for 1/4".
Although with the Superfeet Green Insoles, I think I'm getting a 1/4" lift.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
PaliKona,

If you are constantly fighting to stay forward there is something else going on too! Your discomfort could be the muscle you are using to constantly pull yourself forward is getting overworked?

What bindings are you using? How long is your boot sole (in mm., located near the heel of your boot sole)?

A longer boot sole with a flatter binding like an Atomic or Salomon could be a cause of your back seated bias. Perhaps an increase in this delta angle would help. To experiment, place a 3mm bontex shim between your heel and where it rests on your binding. Then go ski and see if this makes things better? If it does you may want to put a lifter plate on your boot heel.

What was uncomfortable about the heel lift inside your boot and how big was the lift? 1/4" is probably enough in many cases.

let us know?
bud
post #12 of 17
Camping pad is too thick. At least the ones I am familiar with. You can use something much thinner provided it is firm enough. Don't use the very soft blue junk that is available at many shops. Soft won't help.

If you measured your foot with the Brannock device available at a shoe store what would the length be.
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Do ski shops like Christys have the shims you can buy?
post #14 of 17
Palikona:
I think Christy's will have the softer type pads that in my opinion aren't as effective at spreading pressure because they simply crush down too easily. But I am not certain about everything they are offering now, I only know the past.

However I think I now know you are in CO and if you look at the list of bootguys on this site I think you will see some are in CO. They will be able to help. If really necessary I can ship you some, but seems a lot of work and expense from Canada to you when it should be available locally.

Also you could find Orthotist and prosthetic facility in the yellow pages and get Nickelplast from them. They will probably give you a small piece for free. Very good stuff. Heat moldable, sandable and firm. I would shape it appropriately and put in boot without gluing until you are certain function and location are correct. Then glue with contact cement.

Lou
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
ok, thanks for the advice.

This weekend, I'm going to try the heel lifts again, and take out the eliminator pad, b/c i think it might be putting me in the back seat more than I think. If that doesn't help things, I'll focus on these fixes.

Thanks!:
post #16 of 17
PaliKona... Have you had the boot shell fit. Tell us what the shell fit is like before going any further.
post #17 of 17
two things
If you are leaning back the front of the tibia down deep in the boot will be levering against the front of the boot and the back of the tibia at the top of the shell. So is could simply be a stance thing.

If you use the velcro strap under the plastic shell tightening the tongue to the shin you will find that it works better and the tongue stays in contact no matter where you are in stance.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ask the Boot Guys