or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Negative thoughts...

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
How do you deal with them?

When you're in the bumps and it might as well be a minefield, do you utter/scream "bleep this" and find yourself beelining straight to the rest of the day on cruisers?
When your skis are separating and turning every which way in powder ("THIS is supposed to be FUN?"), are you quick to check the signs at the top to see which runs are groomed?
How do YOU generally deal with adversity on the mountain? Where does your mind go, into the" I WILL win" mode or something more like "What's the big dang difference whether I'm an all-mountain skier or not, this ain't fun, it's a good time to call it quits anyway"?
Despite our confidence to begin the day, the mountain can throw things at us that give us pause. It becomes that much easier to settle somewhere a little short of our goals. After all, it IS possible to have a good time, relax on the friendlier blues, smell the roses, "park and ride." Do you find you deal with adversity on the hill the same way you do with obstacles away from skiing?

Instructors, how do you deal with students when they get to that "I quit" stage? Do you question YOUR efficacy?

Advanced skiers, aspiring toward expertdom, do you find it pretty easy to say "Ya know, I ski pretty darn well. Better than 97% of the skiers I know. I don't really NEED to get this short turns on steep terrain down pat"?

And have you ever wondered why it takes ryan a half-page to ask what could be asked in a sentence?

[ September 12, 2002, 07:13 AM: Message edited by: ryan ]
post #2 of 46
Quote:
And have you ever wondered why it takes ryan a half-page to ask what could be asked in a sentence?
More like, How the hell did he get the balls to were those Pant! [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #3 of 46
Thread Starter 
Who'd've thunk - not me - that my first-ever ski gear purchase, those pants, perhaps worn by Andy Mill way back when, long before he'd ever met Chrissy, and in which, perhaps, he skied really, really fast through and around gates set up on Ajax, would become, these many years later, the object of such amusement, derision and wonderment?

Which leads (in)directly back to the question posed to open this topic: How does one deal with adversity?

I heard it said yesterday that adversity does not build character, it reveals it. So, surely, you must all see now that 'tis NOT Gonzo who is the wearer of Rhino Skin. It is me. Me. And I shall - mark these words, oh deriders of past fashion - ski on.

(I sense somehow that this thread might not go quite the way I had hoped... )
post #4 of 46
It depends.

If it's just a challenge then I suck it up, focus on my technique and apply everything I know. If I'm still getting my butt kicked, I'll take some time and analyze what's giving me trouble then go to some easier terrain and practice there, then return and first work things through very slowly (sometimes 1 turn at a time), then go through a few more times til I've got it down.

On the other hand there are times when things just aren't clicking for me...my rhythm (sp?) is off, my legs aren't responding, edges aren't holding...whatever. When that happens I just say the heck with it and go hit the cruisers. I'm not out to compete with anyone, I'm there to have fun and if I'm getting frustrated that's no fun. We all have bad days when no matter what we do we're just not in sync with the mountain. On those days I simply choose to have fun.
post #5 of 46
Thread Starter 
Thanks.
Pretty much my approach. Kinda have learned to pick my spots. Some days, I'm just not "there" to the degree that I might be another time, in which case, HEY, I AM skiing to Have Fun.
post #6 of 46
Ryan,

I am not going to give you any static about those pants. Those pants, however, look really weird with your helmet. I would only wear them separately.

About negative thinking: what is it but resistance to what the universe is teaching you? The moment you acknowledge that this resistance is more about ME than about the mountain, awareness will begin to set you free. You just exited the mindframe of a victim. In other words, we may see the mountain as a tormentor, but that is us adding to the mountain through antropomorphism. In truth, the mountain is your mentor.

Resistance: Deal with it at the level of the problem. Your own spiritual resistance to change. The desire to be comfortable is the enemy of improvement.

I think you asked a very interesting question that gets to the heart of the difficulty in teaching, which is getting a handle on the student's learning profile to the extent you can work with it, not against it.
post #7 of 46
So your saying is that overcoming the fact you looked SPECIAL in that lovely Blue ski pants you still skied. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

As far as Gonzo is concern, he is just a butt head.

I have never thought that skiing was a bother, more like a way to vent off life. The harder the run, the more satisfied I feel after making through it. Then I can look back and say.. "I did That!" In fact, I always like bad conditions cause it ment fewer skiers.

Quote:
quote by ryan:(I sense somehow that this thread might not go quite the way I had hoped... )
No ryan I do not think this is going in the direction you wanted.
[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #8 of 46
Thread Starter 
In which case...

"Ah, go ski Paoli awready why dont'cha."

Special, huh?

edit: So, Nolo...maybe a blue helmet then?

[ September 12, 2002, 08:04 AM: Message edited by: ryan ]
post #9 of 46
First, let me say that I have already read all the psycho babble books, Inner Skiing and the likes. When negativity strikes, its curtains for me. There is nothing that can change my mindset.

Some of the reasons for negativity are rational, too many a$$holes on the mountain on a given day.
Some are just plain stupid, and I should know better!

My classic; If I fall I am a complete moron who has know right to be on the mountain in the first place. Better call it a day!

This is why i do not do well with very negative instuctors. I'm hard enough on myself!
post #10 of 46
Quote:
Originally posted by ryan:
Special, huh?
Its pretty bad when I ran that post through my spell checker and it still missed my typo. : [img]redface.gif[/img]

but I still post... no matter how bad my grammer is.
post #11 of 46
Quote:
Originally posted by ryan:
...worn by Andy Mill way back when, long before he'd ever met Chrissy, and in which...
Andy Mill, or Andy Dick?

When I'm faced with something that really challenges me, I remember the words of Stewart Smalley;

"I'm good enough, I'm smart enough, and doggone it people like me!"

Or I just realize that the only way that I am going to be able to ski it next time, is ski it this time. This attitude has opened more terrain of the moutain faster than any other that I have had. This attitude has also forced me to climb trees to retrieve skis before!

Or just don't think about it until you get to the bottom.
post #12 of 46
LM,

I have found negative self-talk to be more common in women. Don't think about a pink polka dotted elephant. Maybe you need to take a look at infor on Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP). Stay away from Werner Erhardt!!!

My first article for TPS was called "The Power of Positive Teaching," about NLP in the learning environment. Hey, it's already there when the student shows up talking herself out of it with comments that would earn her a bloody nose if she ever addressed them to another person.

It sounds "new age" but affirmations are very important in learning and change. Mermer Blakeslee's coach is what I call positive self talk.

The Nag arises from past conditioning (The Other); the coach arises from your essence (The Self). The coach will always trump the nag with the addition of awareness.

Of course, this goes back to Maslow: One cannot ascend to the pinnacle of self-actualization until one can LOVE oneself.
post #13 of 46
Quote:
Originally posted by AltaSkier:

Or just don't think about it until you get to the bottom.
I think that's how I have done it many times, or I am like "OH SH*T, what was I thinking" as I am right in the middle of something. So I learn to save it for the bottom.
post #14 of 46
Thread Starter 
EDITED BY Ed E. Ted.

[ September 12, 2002, 08:39 AM: Message edited by: ryan ]
post #15 of 46
LM,

I would have never thought that of you. With all the things you have been doing and accomplishments, I for one admire ya.

I like Nolo Post.

My problem is House Cleaning. I HATE IT! I would rather be outside playing with the girls then cleaning house.

Weight Lose can be like that also, trying to keep it real.

I guess skiing I have never had that problem, I loved being challenged and would push myself more. Now if I can just do that with my other two, I would be SuperMOM!

Got to go... Pick up daughter at pre-school.
post #16 of 46
Ryan,

I would pick up the minor color in the pants with the helmet to balance the dark and light shades of your ensemble.
post #17 of 46
Quote:
Originally posted by ryan:
Who'd've thunk - not me - that my first-ever ski gear purchase, those pants, perhaps worn by Andy Mill way back when, long before he'd ever met Chrissy, and in which, perhaps, he skied really, really fast through and around gates set up on Ajax, would become, these many years later, the object of such amusement, derision and wonderment?

Which leads (in)directly back to the question posed to open this topic: How does one deal with adversity?

I heard it said yesterday that adversity does not build character, it reveals it. So, surely, you must all see now that 'tis NOT Gonzo who is the wearer of Rhino Skin. It is me. Me. And I shall - mark these words, oh deriders of past fashion - ski on.

(I sense somehow that this thread might not go quite the way I had hoped... )
Do you often fantasize about getting into Andy Mill's pants?
post #18 of 46
Thread Starter 
Breel-yunt as always...
post #19 of 46
ryan, ditch the pants and get one of these:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=1858692418

I'll be wearing mine at the Utah gathering!
post #20 of 46
Thread Starter 
I can't tell you how much I WISH you'd be wearing those. Mine would be quickly forgotten. In fact, they'd be yours, bronzed, 'cause you'd "win" the contest.
Seriously, those are WAY sweeeeet. Even "pretty."
post #21 of 46
I bought a few one-piece ski suites last year on e-bay for joke gifts. Got myself one as well, just for kicks. Picked up a brand new one-peice Descente (sp?) for $20. Much ulglier than the one above. Maybe I'll wear it, might impress the ladies!

I've got an extra, your welcome to it! People keep giving them back. :

PS - Sorry about the hijack.
post #22 of 46
Thread Starter 
I suspect my present ensemble will meet with greater approval. Almost did a search for an image or two but decided, Nah, that's trying too hard.

Actually, lady here at work, and her husband, threw me down a couple one-pieces, not that unlike yours. One for me, one for my girlfriend - red, white and blue. I politely accepted, said Thank You and promptly donated them to a thrift store.

[ September 12, 2002, 12:24 PM: Message edited by: ryan ]
post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally posted by ryan:
Breel-yunt as always...
##### Thank you. Its nice to be appreciated.#####
post #24 of 46
Thread Starter 
No prob. You da ###.
post #25 of 46
Altaskier is on to something here. He's out to corner the market on 1980's neon colored ski suits. Oh that Altaskier is a shrewed one. This is starting to look like the Hunts Brothers Silver Market manipulations from back in the 1970's. It won't be long before all the hip hop jibbers hanging at the 1/2 pipe will all want this new Street fashion trend and the only place to find a neon yellow and purple one piece suit will be Altaskier.TNF Bonfire and Ripcurl will be cought with thier ski pants down! Sales will plummet on baggy tan ski pants and olive green jackets! Prices on neon powder suits will sky rocket! Then when the time is right he will flood the market. The market will crash! Can Wall st survive? In the mean time Altaskier will have the money and Power to Buy Alta as his own private ski mountain. I tell you Alta skier may look like a low key ski fanatic but under all that is the mind of a master manipulater of hip ski fashion.
post #26 of 46
ryan, unless you are just having an off day I would look at what appears to be happening (skis separating in deeper snow) and try to figure out a cause. It could be as simple as too much weight on one ski or a balance issue. If you think you have found the reason, go to easier terrain and practice ie. weight more evenly distributed etc. With students I tried to never take away anything, behavior, movement pattern etc. without offering something better.

So I wouldn't suggest you lose the pants without providing you a better option.

Hey maybe we could have a contest in Utah... Ugliest: one piece, parka, hat, parka, pants.
post #27 of 46
Thread Starter 
Luckster,

those were actually examples only. (I, of course, have it all down.)

Actually, had my powder breakthrough (sorta) last year at whistler (when you ducked me ) when i finally got the "skis together make a nice little platform" part, and had a blast. not that there still isn't work to do.
post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally posted by Utah49:
Altaskier is on to something here. He's out to corner the market on 1980's neon colored ski suits. Oh that Altaskier is a shrewed one. This is starting to look like the Hunts Brothers Silver Market manipulations from back in the 1970's. It won't be long before all the hip hop jibbers hanging at the 1/2 pipe will all want this new Street fashion trend and the only place to find a neon yellow and purple one piece suit will be Altaskier.TNF Bonfire and Ripcurl will be cought with thier ski pants down! Sales will plummet on baggy tan ski pants and olive green jackets! Prices on neon powder suits will sky rocket! Then when the time is right he will flood the market. The market will crash! Can Wall st survive? In the mean time Altaskier will have the money and Power to Buy Alta as his own private ski mountain. I tell you Alta skier may look like a low key ski fanatic but under all that is the mind of a master manipulater of hip ski fashion.
Finially somebody who realizes that I'm not messing around.
post #29 of 46
give up or say "i'm good enough"?? no way!

i've always been obsessive about sports - if it's hard (and cool), i wanna learn it. as a kid, i'd practice dribbling skills for ~6 hours a day during the summer just to become a better point guard. my new passion is bumps - if there's a steep or rutted or icy bump run i can't ski well, i'll ski it all damn day, or all season, until i can.

i never understood people who gave up easily or resigned themselves to being good but not great skiers. i've found that most of them are the same people who can't seem to manage to quit smoking, lose weight, etc.
post #30 of 46
People love to see it when I'm having a bad day, and right now, I'm having...some bad days.

Yesterday, I just couldn't get away from the tube. It's so, f'in, sad.

That's when it came to me.

Life, is not about what happens when things are going well. It's about what happens when things are going bad. How we handle life when things are going bad, that's, what makes the difference. Wives who lost their husbands. Husbands who lost their wives. People, who lost people they love. Did they pack it in? No, f'in, way.

And at that point, I quit cryin about my f'in problems and got my sorry ass to work. I'm gonna win, just like I always do.

"I'm in a New York, state of mind"

So the next time you're not skiing well, or thinking, "Poor me", think about those people.

Then look up at the sky, look around, and think about how lucky you are. Then pick your ass up and go make somethin happen. And while you're at it, smile.

Problems? What problems?

[ September 12, 2002, 05:26 PM: Message edited by: SCSA ]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion