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How to hit gates in GS and SL? - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb View Post
Just wanted to give a big thank you to all those that posted info in this thread.

The information was very helpfull and helped me to understand a bit more how to come through a gate better.

The biggest thing, I think, was to not concentrate so much on hitting the gate, but rather choose a line and if the gate gets in the way so be it.

We had our city open GS Masters race tonight and I won the 18 - 39 age group. I also had the fastest single run of the night across all age groups. Last year I was 10th place.

It's nice to have Bears in your back pocket.
You could also just watch some world cup and europa videos on youtube and do what they do.
post #32 of 50
Woohoo!!! :
Great result!!
post #33 of 50

Nice to dig up this thread, I was curious as to how much new racers would shin gates. The point of proper line leading to shinning gates made sense.
John

post #34 of 50
 I have tried slalom twice and it has taught me two things. One trying to shine gates without actually knowing what your doing leads to either you hitting the gate with your ski or you straddling the pole. Two its really hard to get out of the mind set of having to hit every gate and when you start reaching for gates thats when you start crashing.

In GS I learned that hitting a gate with your shoulder is a bad idea, ie you end up flying through the air as the gate does not give way like a slalom gate. 
post #35 of 50
Don't get gate fixation.  Look for the line your skis are going to take, don't look at the gate.  Or, as we used to say in powder skiing "Look for the white, don't look for the green."



Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

 I have tried slalom twice and it has taught me two things. One trying to shine gates without actually knowing what your doing leads to either you hitting the gate with your ski or you straddling the pole. Two its really hard to get out of the mind set of having to hit every gate and when you start reaching for gates thats when you start crashing.

In GS I learned that hitting a gate with your shoulder is a bad idea, ie you end up flying through the air as the gate does not give way like a slalom gate. 
post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Temple67 View Post

Nice to dig up this thread, I was curious as to how much new racers would shin gates. The point of proper line leading to shinning gates made sense.
John


As SkiRacer55 said, don't intend on shinning a gate. Let it flow into the turn. IF your line is tight and your turn apex finishes at the gate or just above it, it will become automatic. The more angulation with BOTH legs you have, the more likely your upper body will end up inside the gate thus shinning the gate. 
This two picture sequence is from last year, a week after breaking my shoulder (notice the harness and the rather limp looking left arm.) Still, I think it's a pretty good illustration of how I'd describe where the gates will hit you- just under the hand guard on the pole and at the bottom of the shin guard on your leg.




Here is a picture of my friend whom I consider to be a pretty strong slalom skier (and this in particular was a blistering fast run.)

post #37 of 50
Both of you would have been faster by not cross blocking that gate.
post #38 of 50
Without seeing video to get the context and the line:

#270 is hitting the gate low and appears to be reaching.
#199 take the gate high which generally is good. 
I would like to see more angulation from #270 and more weight on the outside ski. 

As previous posts have indicated, the cross block is really just a consequence of a well timed pole plant.

Another thing I might add few those new to the game is to look down the hill and not at the gate you are approaching.  The latter is a recipe for disaster and will result in hitting far more gates than required and much slower times.
post #39 of 50
Great posts, question
How do you keep looking down the hill and cross block the near gate?   Lastly why would the two skiers (pictures) have been quicker to not cross block?
post #40 of 50
They both reached which caused their upper body to rotate. This usually causes the inside hand to drop and pressure leaving the outside ski at the tail usually causing it to wash a little.

Just squeezing around it would have been much smoother for both athletes as it would have kept them more loaded up.




post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Temple67 View Post

Great posts, question
How do you keep looking down the hill and cross block the near gate?   Lastly why would the two skiers (pictures) have been quicker to not cross block?

If you are cross blocking, the gate should be passing to the outside of your body. It will be in your line of vision to the outside of the turn. Looking two turns ahead will keep it in your vision. If as a Arrgee pointed out, that the two racers were reaching, then the gate is directly in their line of vision as it is either directly in front or just inside them and they should have used an inside block, not a cross block.

The greatest fault I see in good SL racers that I coach, is that they reach and generally end up with their tails skidding and having to recover. If you pass the gate with your hands up in front of your face, not with the inside hand lagging behind, it will be quite intuitive to know which arm to block with. When the inside hand is down and back, you don't have much opportunity to inside block. Thus you reach.

In GS, maintaining an outside focus with your hands pointing towards your tips will pretty much insure that you don't have to block so much as simply take the gate on your inside arm, or lat. The GS skier directly above is showing great body position. He didn't have to explictly block as his inside arm was already in a blocking position.

You will notice that many racers will take a 'swimming' approach down the course, bringing their hands together in front of their face as they pass the gate. This gets them into a balanced hand position with outside focus and serves to insure that no gate will get between their hands.
post #42 of 50

Looking at the at the pictures TMAS provided it got me thinking about edge pressure. I was wondering what amount of pressure is apllied to the downhill ski compared to the uphill ski. Or am I over thinking and I should only worry about loading up the downhill ski??  Thanks again for all the help, it is great to have coaches/expert racers to bounce questions off of!
John

post #43 of 50
Should be 100% downhill... Although Benni Raich and some others are playing with standing on the inside in some tight SL sets, but their degree of refinement is beyond what the average mortal can acheive so just focus on keeping outside pressure and starting the turn by moving your body down the fall line.
post #44 of 50
Thanks, focusing on the downhill ski keeps things simple. I need simple : )  I am a little confussed as to why we practice the one ski drill. I thought that was to help with using the uphill ski during the turn? 
John  
post #45 of 50
So, help me understand what's happening here. Was it the shinning or was it the (cross) blocking that took the gate? Or, was it both? From this angle, it looked like she was a bit wide to have shinned it. But, it doesn't like like there's reaching either.
Slalom
 
post #46 of 50
The picture is a bit after the fact but I would guess that she reached to block it considering she's across the fall line at that point. It may be a combination of reaching in a brushing the inside knee...
post #47 of 50
 I think the thing to take way here is to not be fixated on the block, but rather concentrate on line, looking ahead and timing.  As said above, both skiers likely would've been better off not going for the block, either letting the gate hit you as-is, or inside-arm blocking and concentrating on better technique and line.

If you are skiing the right line, the gate will naturally hit the outside pole without any excess arm movement - again, this has been mentioned before.  I'd still teach kids to learn the inside-arm block before an outside-arm block - heck, I'd teach it to all new slalom skiers.  Work on fundamentals first, then worry about blocking the gate - thus why stubbies work wonders.
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMAS29 View Post

They both reached which caused their upper body to rotate. This usually causes the inside hand to drop and pressure leaving the outside ski at the tail usually causing it to wash a little.

Just squeezing around it would have been much smoother for both athletes as it would have kept them more loaded up.





Thanks for the note- I will keep that in mind for this year. This section of the course was obviously pretty flat and moderate speeds, which I think focusing on not scrubbing turns on letting the tails drift with an unnecessary cross block makes sense.

By the way, I really like this GS turn. Power and balance...
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55 View Post
- For SL here's what I wear:
Damn, its a race, not a war.

Absolute essentials: Shinners. Arguably pole guards. Everything else goes into the "nice to have" category.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnstormer
Worded another way, if your crossblocking hand is down by your waist when you contact the gate it will take a lot of force to clear the gate and you risk getting your upper body twisted/jacked and ultimately late for the start of your next turn.

Watch the guys on the World Cup who are skiing very fast and see how high their hands are when they crossblock. Typically the crossblocking hand is near shoulder height when clearing the gate.
Another good reason to block high is that it can make the gate tweak your inside ski somewhat less.

Actually the 1st time i skied a slalom course, I thought someone had shot me!

IT IS A WAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #50 of 50
No lie.  I had a similar experience the first time I smashed plastic in a SL course.  I thought I was running a gauntlet composed of a pack of Cub Scouts armed with wiffle ball bats.  So I got all the stuff I figured I needed...padded suit, shin guards, pole guards, heavy duty Reusch slalom gloves, an armored slalom top...but no helmet/face bar, an item one of my teammates also skipped.  Result:  The next time we trained, he face-blocked a gate, took seven stiches in his chin and knocked out a tooth.  Did I learn?  No, I wear a sign that says "kick me...I'm stupid." 

Result:  The next time we trained, I clipped a gate, it hit the ground, bounced up, and creamed me across the left ear.  I couldn't hear out of that ear, even Ted Nugent cranked up to 10, for about a week.  Now I wear a Scott SL helmet, even when we're setting a course, and I'm seriously thinking of getting a Champion Athletic Supporter with a steel cup...




Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post




Actually the 1st time i skied a slalom course, I thought someone had shot me!

IT IS A WAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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