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7 Year Old -Yes or No with poles - Page 2

post #31 of 46
There is no problem with no poles . Look at Andy Mahre. When your son wants to become more efficient in uneven and more challenging terrain the advantage and balance poles give him will be to his benefit.

Skiing is supposed to be fun for him and if that is what he likes so be it.

He is only 6 and poles might be a distraction to him at this point but eventually I think he would find the skill of pole usage a nice tool to make use of.

I wouldn't sweat it unless a good instructor that works with him thinks he is ready for them and would find them helpful in his progress. Even then it's his and your choice to make. .
post #32 of 46
I agree. There's a lady here my age who had wrist surgery (like me) and skis with no poles. She was told to the first year and got used to it. She gets down what she needs to get down and is nice and fluid. I will say, however, that it is a pain to ride the chair with her as she has to do the old herringbone to get to the chair and prevents others from loading simultaneously.
post #33 of 46
Another vote for 'it depends'... What's the kid like? Is he in a group (if so how big/what are the other kids like)? How's his balance/hands anyway?

As a rule though, I'd say no, especially for first-timers (7 days in is a more down to the subjectivity of the instructor).

Also, why do poles mean fun... many kids think that snowblading is exceptional fun, and you don't use poles for that...
post #34 of 46
Maybe you should ask him. Give it a try and if it is not working then go back to No poles.
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
We should ask some seven year olds what they want. If poles are like broccolli, don't make them use them/not use them.
So now we should ask a 7 year old kid what he thinks??? LOL, sure we can and we should ask him what he thinks but its the parrent that desides what best for him. And the best thing he can do is to ask arround, preferably from a professional ski instructor. What if a kid doesent want to wear a helmet? Oh, offcourse you dont have to wear a helmet my little sweetheart....
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by seattle_sun View Post
My problem is that my 6 yo won't ski with poles. He has been skiing since he was 3 and skis down most anything. In the bumps, he wedges through and on very steep stuff, he'll go back to the wedge. On the groomed, he is a rocket- nice and forward with good turns.


Any problems with no poles?
I think that there is absolutely no problem with no poles. My 6y wanted poles last year and I gave him some and he has been dooing great except for poking his big brother in the back every chanse he gets. But he has his chops together and his coaches have not complained. He is in a group with much older kids and many have poles so thats no problem.

I think that skiing without poles is the best exersice there is for balance and proper turning technique. Its incredible how much we missuse our poles. Leave your poles at home next time you ski and find out for yourselfe.
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
I think that skiing without poles is the best exersice there is for balance and proper turning technique. .

Great. Can't disagree with that. I'm not sure that is a primary concern for a six year old.

I did see one stuck on a cat track yesterday crying his head off. Mom was herringboning back up to him. Hope she got him smiling by explaning he couldn't have poles until he showed good technique and balance.
post #38 of 46
TDK6
The biggest problem with kids and poles is that the manufacturers do not make the pole grips small enough for them to get their hands around, especially with mittens. Kerma makes a kids pole grip that works. If you can't find those take the normal grip and have a shop put them on a belt sander and round them down so they fit your child's hand. The baskets should also be cut down proportionate to the child and the length of the pole. Race baskets work well. Have seen many a kids pole with a snowflake basket that weighted more than the entire pole. The pole comes to us from cross country skiing and is used primarily for propulsion. It will and does enhance some aspects of skiing but the greatest use is getting around on flat ground. Remember how it was getting up in the deep powder? Try it without poles. The herringbone, duck walk through the lift line, on everyone else's skis and the constant pulling of kids onto chairs would be eliminated if instructor and parents taught the kids how to use the poles properly. It is just as hard for a kid to move around on flat ground as it is the adults. The added width of the upper body with the poles in hand can enhance anyone's skiing. The pole is probably the most improperly used piece of equipment the skier possesses. The proper use (or abuse) of the ski pole in modern skiing is something that is poorly taught and much misinterpreted.
Size your kids poles about 2 inches longer than the measurement you would use for an adult. Why? Because if an adult is using the pole properly to push themselves along, their hands will be on the top of the pole. With a childs small hand they will most likely go to the full grip. If you teach them properly you won't be so tired at the end of the day from being a poma lift for your kids.
post #39 of 46
No poles---unless deep snow or moguls. At 7 times, likely he/she is on neither.


I am currently teaching 6 6-7 yr olds. 1 has poles. His daddy bought them for his birthday. Beside them being a pain in my butt, which kid has the weakest turning skills? NOTE: All of the other kids are either Patrol, Race or Instructor kids---and they ROCK, not my words, the words of the crowds of viewers watching as we pass......----

Especially in the T-park---all kids love.....no poles.
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom111869 View Post
My son is 7 years old and will be spending his 7th day on ski's with me this Friday. He's comfortable now in a wedge, but turning is something we are still working on. His previous days on ski's were without poles. I'm wondering if this should be his first time with poles. It sure would help in the lift lines and getting on the chair, but I'm afraid it might be a distraction when actually sliding down the hill.

What are your opinions?
I think if a kid can't turn comfortably, then the poles will get in their way. Poles really only come in handy when parallel skiing starts. That's my opinion though. As for getting into the lift lines and stuff like that, I would recommend giving him a hand until the poles will actually help him.

Of course, you might want to try it just to see how it goes, then make the final decision the next time you go out.
post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom111869 View Post
My son is 7 years old and will be spending his 7th day on ski's with me this Friday. He's comfortable now in a wedge, but turning is something we are still working on. His previous days on ski's were without poles. I'm wondering if this should be his first time with poles. It sure would help in the lift lines and getting on the chair, but I'm afraid it might be a distraction when actually sliding down the hill.

What are your opinions?
I just re-read this..... it sounds like you are teaching him yourself. Were those 7 days on a magic carpet or straight from the top?

Regardless, I'd get a pro to teach him to ski. After 7 days, an average seven year old should have little to no problems turning in a wedge. Short circuit the problem, and get a pro - private if you can.
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
I still remember my first time on skis, 47 years ago. I was five, and they put skis on my feet but didn't give me poles. I was really frustrated and after a minute they gave me poles, and I've been happy ever since.
Mine wasn't quite 47 years ago, probably a bit closer to 17 in fact, but I still have memories of the very first time my parents got me on skis. I couldn't have been much over 5, but I can still pretty clearly remember being absolutely furious and frustrated by my lack of poles. I made it through half a day of ski school before I took off, found my parents, got some poles, and followed them around for the rest of the day.

That said, when I teach friends to ski, I never let them use poles. I didn't read through this entire thread, but I'm sure my thoughts echo many others. Skiing with your feet is hard enough to learn. More variables can't help. Sure it sucks trying to slide up to the chairlift, but that's hardly the point.

Another point; everyone I've ever taught spends their first few hours, at the very least, waving their arms around wildly in the air to help maintain their balance. Poles would no doubt cut down on such flailing, thus depriving me of one of my favorite photo opportunities
post #43 of 46
And really, you DON'T need poles to get around on the flats. A good skate builds your muscles and actually I find I go faster without using my poles when I skate. I admit, uphill skating does seem to require poles and I also admit if the approach to the chair is tricky you'll end up stepping on others' skis. But a kid this age is usually still with an adult unless he's a pretty accomplished skier and I never found pulling my kid with my pole on the flats to be that tough.
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
I just re-read this..... it sounds like you are teaching him yourself. Were those 7 days on a magic carpet or straight from the top?

Regardless, I'd get a pro to teach him to ski. After 7 days, an average seven year old should have little to no problems turning in a wedge. Short circuit the problem, and get a pro - private if you can.
And how much are privates where you are? They're $105/hour here.
post #45 of 46
Then go for group/programs. Whatever it takes to get competent instruction. IT'S WORTH IT!
post #46 of 46
Unless the youngster is skiing at such a level of advancement that poles might better lend themselves to, I'm against them, as they tend to be an unnecessary distraction.

In order to get their neuromuscular skiing 'core' focused, distractive movements and appendages should be avoided.
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