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MA Request

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dq3-EHGoyc



This was taken on a green run at Breckenridge. The goal here was to link some carved turns and progressively increase the angles.

Thoughts? Suggestions? Thanks!
post #2 of 17
This is nice. Definitely linked carved turns.
There are stuff to work on, such as balance and your movements, but first it would be very interesting to hear what you think.
What's your feeling skiing? What feels good and what feels like it needs improvement?

It seems to me you need to sharpen your edges regardless your technique.
The easiest would be handing them in to the shop for sharpening (not dulling the fore and aft). Then when you get them, just take some raw porcelain (like bottom of a coffe cup, a porcelain fuse etc) and draw it along the edge once from the bottom and once from the side. This makes most skis work on ice.
post #3 of 17
I dont see any need for sharp edges on this clip. Good edge hold and no slippin. Very nice turns indeed but I see a little hint of park and ride. You angulater nicely but a bit too early for my taste. Angulation should be progressive and add pressure to your skis at the critical moment. Now you sort of just tip and arc. Nothing wrong with that since not everyboey know how to do that properly but as you can see you get caught on the inside ski a couple of times and that is because you incline more than what is possible at that moment. It could also be that you are not used to your skis. BTW, what skis are you on?

I would also like for you to flex more through your transitions. Now you are moving a bit too much up and down with your head and upper body. Try to relece the turn by flexing the old outside foot. You will then be able to tighten your arcs because your Center Of Mass will be lower and you will have a more inclinded stance to work with. This will make your moving mass less, your leggs, and they will be able to move quicker underneath you. Think of cross under. Wasnt that what you wanted to do?

Also, I see a bit of A-frame so just be aware of it. If you want to get rid of it you need to do it intentionally. It will not go away by itselfe.

Nice skiing, thanks for posting.
post #4 of 17
onyxjl it's hard to determine much from a vid but I do see some things.

First it looks like you are trying to generate more speed than the slope would suggest. This is apparent from the slight pushoff and head back and forth. This is putting you to far inside and you are losing the outside ski dominance.

Try it again only relax and shorten the old outside leg/new inside leg to control pressure and help initiate the turn. Don't push the turn beyond what the slope will give you. This should allow you to be more progressive on edge and develop better flow.

Look at you vids again after you try this.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies.

I'll put those suggestions to work today and try to get another run. Pierre is definitely right that I was trying to over-ski that slope. Particularly after it rolls off to flat.

Pierre you mention you cant tell much from the video. What would make for a better shot? I'll probably try to get one of the shots where you pass by the camera.
post #6 of 17
As for photog - utilize the zoom feature and edit a slo mo version.

Nice relaxed skiing. That slope would have worked better for larger radius, faster turns.

The little stumble at the end is physics catching up. GO FASTER!

Someone's signature line here reads or read "Not turning? Go faster!" Too true.
post #7 of 17
onyxjl,
Are you still working with Arcmeister on a regular basis?
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
onyxjl,
Are you still working with Arcmeister on a regular basis?
Ahhh, that's it. I knew I'd seen that stumble before!

Onyxjl, a couple lateral balance losses early in the turns, aye? Let the force(s) be with you, young Luke. You're on a flat slope there, and as such turn forces are hard to come by. There are a few things you can do to compensate.

- Dive into the front of the boot at the start of your turn. It will bend the front of the ski, sharpen the top of the turn, and thus amp up the forces that keep you in balance.

- Get the outside ski engaged, and feel the force feedback it provides, before you try to further you edge angle development.

- Watch your inside shoulder. You're dropping it into the turn before you achieve solid outside ski engagement in the turns you lose balance. Think about trying to lift your inside shoulder and hip as you tip into and initiate your turns.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
onyxjl,
Are you still working with Arcmeister on a regular basis?
As much as possible, hopefully more this season than last.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
I got a quick few runs in this morning before going for some bootwork. I applied the advice given and stopped trying to over ski the flat slopes. That is something I get easily carried away with. The turns felt much more solid when I set them up at the top before rushing in for the angles. I'll try and get some video.

The clip was taken at the start of the second day this season. I want to track down any leftover bad habits before I spend the rest of the season compensating.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl View Post
As much as possible, hopefully more this season than last.
I'd have him work with your on your inside leg. I think that lack of activity with the inside leg is leading to everything that Rick described in his post.
post #12 of 17
I like to do a test and see if I can lift the inside ski off of the snow (at any point in the turn). If you were to apply that test to the video what would be outcome be?
post #13 of 17
Skiing tucked with spread weight distribution I think it's quite possible to carve quite high angles. Just go with the butt first.
As the speed increases more and more weight will go to the outer leg and the tuck will be released automagically when the forces becomes larger.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
I'd have him work with your on your inside leg. I think that lack of activity with the inside leg is leading to everything that Rick described in his post.
I see what you are saying here Heluva, but I think Rick and Pierre might be more on target as far as cause. On these particular turns, because I am diving into the turn early in an attempt to create a shorter turn than my speed allows I am preventing the inside leg from becoming more active. I would like to see the inside foot be more active in these turns not necessarily by tipping further, but by being kept closer under my hips and towards the stance ski.

Being overly aggressive laterally I think I am actually using my inside leg as a platform of support in these turns. That prevents me from getting it tipped further into the turn. Following Rick's advice, and resulting in the ability to do what Max suggests, I would be getting off that inside leg and prevent blocking it.

However, to your point, if I simply allowed the activity of my inside foot to shape the turn while supporting it with good upper body movements I wouldn't have to worry about shutting down the inside foot by standing on it.

Does that make sense?
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
I'd have him work with your on your inside leg. I think that lack of activity with the inside leg is leading to everything that Rick described in his post.
What exactly do you suggest he do with his inside leg? More shin pressure? Tipping for parallel shafts? Tipping first with the inside foot? Put more/less weight on it? Wider/closer stance?
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl View Post
...I would like to see the inside foot be more active in these turns not necessarily by tipping further, but by being kept closer under my hips and towards the stance ski.

Being overly aggressive laterally I think I am actually using my inside leg as a platform of support in these turns. That prevents me from getting it tipped further into the turn. Following Rick's advice, and resulting in the ability to do what Max suggests, I would be getting off that inside leg and prevent blocking it.

However, to your point, if I simply allowed the activity of my inside foot to shape the turn while supporting it with good upper body movements I wouldn't have to worry about shutting down the inside foot by standing on it.

Does that make sense?
Yes I think we are both on the same page. I was giving you the benefit of the doubt that you weren't trying to dive too far into the turn. A result of what Rick suggests will definitely be that you will maintain your outside ski balance and not fall onto the inside ski. This will allow your inside ski to - as you say - not move away from your stance leg as the turn progresses and allow you to keep it at a similar edge angle to the outside ski. As you say in your last sentence - if you were to use the inside foot properly, you wouldn't be able to use it incorrectly anymore - so what Rick is suggesting would be accomplished much more easily because you would eliminate one very big potential road block. You can look at it from either direction, but the result will more than likely be the same.

Good turns by the way.

Later

Greg
post #17 of 17
onyxjl,

Some good movement through the turns. As stated above, there is an upward movement in transition that causes your skis to move closer together there and then they move away from each other toward the turn apex. A more diagional movement across your skis in transition will keep you better balanced there and also will allow an earlier edge engagement (edge engagement on clip is just before the fall line). Think of tipping the new inside ski on to the downhill edge and guide it through the turn so it also describes the arc of the turn. This will eliminate the A-frame.

I also see a light pushing movement of the outside ski toward the apex. That push is what caused the slip when you encountered some harder snow. Think of keeping soft on the inside ski rather then pressing on the outside ski. You do get caught inside the turn a few times, keep balanced between the skis. The little push of the outside ski is what is getting you caught inside.

As the ski season progresses, you will get a better feel of how your skis are engaging with the snow, don't force it but, allow them to do what they are designed to do.

Over all, nice!

Hope this helps.

RW
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