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Tasks to promote a stronger inside leg?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
The problem, a very dominate outside leg in the middle and finishing phase of a turn. The inside leg is not engaged and tends to float in. What tasks or exercises would you give your student to fix this.

I must teach this on Tuesday night as part of my cert. training, Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 16
What level of cert are you going for? I could give you a few obvious ones off the top of my head, but first I would like to hear where you would go with this one on your own.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Level II, I think I am going to have the class while standing still, pull the up hill, inside leg back which will cause them to get that feeling. Then we will appli it on a traverse, then on some slow c shaped turns on a moderate slope. If time permits I will then have then exagerate a wider than usual stance and see if that also promotes a more active inside leg. I will get the chance to try this tomorrow night. If it seems to work I will add it, on Tuesday.
post #4 of 16
You can enhance the pulling back activity by kneeling in front of a skier on a flat spot and pulling on his/her ski tips alternatingly while he/she resists having you pull. Develops a sense of how much pulling back one can do.
post #5 of 16
Thanks MrDave. I think you will do just fine. Beyond what Kneale suggested, remember to always describe what it feels like to you when describing the tasks, along with a simple the explanation of the expected pressure changes and ski/snow interaction. Follow through with some good feedback and coaching and you should get some good changes in the group.

You could take the pull back into a more delayed weight transfer through the top of the turn, with the idea that the turn will be entered with more equal weight on both feet, with a more natural transfer through middle of the turn. This can be done with easy open parallel turns as well, instead of the more traditional use of delayed weight transfer in more dynamic parallel turns.

I've always liked "cowboy turns" for developing inside foot and leg activity and more fluid long leg short leg movements, along with effective ski/snow interaction with both skis.

If I could offer any advice it would be to teach what you know and not to try to use something someone told you the night before without successfull practice. We need ownership of what we teach, particularly in an exam setting. You probably know that already though. Let us know how it goes for you, and if we can help in any further way.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thank You Both!

I will let you know how it goes.:
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDave View Post
The problem, a very dominate outside leg in the middle and finishing phase of a turn. The inside leg is not engaged and tends to float in. What tasks or exercises would you give your student to fix this.

I must teach this on Tuesday night as part of my cert. training, Thanks in advance!
Are you trying to promote more pressure on the inside ski? or more edge? or both? Or are you trying to promote a "stronger inside half". Because I think these are different? I could be wrong because many times I am?

If you are trying to promote more weight on the inside ski, simply widening the stance as suggested above will force weight on the inside ski because it is impossible to balance solely on the outside ski with an exaggerated wide stance.

If you are trying to promote a "stronger inside half" pulling the inside foot back seems counterproductive?
post #8 of 16
mr.D,
A lot has been published about strong inside half but IMO the simplist solution would be dual fulcrum leg steering. It's a great way to maintain a strong inside half but you need to know how to do that before you can teach it.
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the suggestions, I never got to teach on Tuesday, we ran out of time. I did get some time to practice the drills on Monday night and found:

The goal is to keep the uphill, inside leg active, weighted and edging. I experimented and I found that pulling the leg back caused greater flexion in the ankle, resulting in better shin boot contact. I found was able to control the shape of my turns with ease. With the leg pulled back I felt the pressure between my ski and the snow from the ball of my foot to the tip. A wider stance also promoted more weight on the inside ski.

I would seem that if most of the weight was on the outside of the turn it required extra movement to get the downhill foot to roll to the new inside edge. Sometimes I see skiers that are heavily weighted to the outside, start a turn a slight stem of the uphill ski.

I believe that both drills, will allow a skier with a inactive inside ski to feel the difference. It was much easier to start a turn by rolling of the foot to the new inside edge.

I hope to try this in out training next time.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
dual fulcrum leg steering?

Can you explain how!
post #11 of 16
Ever use an aerobic slide? Or even better take two sheets of paper and place them on the carpet in front of you. Step onto the right one with both feet. Turn the feet together and pivot the piece of paper left and right. This is single fulcrum steering. Notice the type of movements you need to use to accomplish the task.
Note: notice I made no mention of leg steering in this drill.

Now step onto both pieces of paper.
Instead of turning both pieces of paper like you did before, pivot the heels out and the toes inward. Doing this requires the torso to remain stable and the legs to turn beneath it. When you can do this, try turning both feet the same direction but make sure you keep the legs working beneath a stable torso. Another way to do this is to stand on two bar stools and turn the legs as described above. Of course if you do this in a bar expect the bartender to cut you off.
Note: Notice there are two pivot points, one under the arch of each foot. Dual fulcrum (pivot points) leg steering is a bit more complex but I think these two examples describe it very well.
post #12 of 16
Jasp, I have always understood fulcrum turning as turning one leg or foot against the other which requires more even weighting and a wider stance to allow this mechanism to work? Using one leg to counteract against the other. "dual" fulcrum turning is a new term to me?
post #13 of 16
You can't do single fulcrum "steering". You can twist and cause turning, but neither foot/leg is the fulcrum. With two footed/legged steering, only one is an actual fulcrum at any one moment. A skilled practitioner can make it look simultaneous, but it's really sequential. JASP's "dual" is his description of the traditional fulcrum turning action. The short description of fulcrum use in Bob Barnes's The Complete Encyclopedia of Skiing is "In the fulcrum rotary mechanism, each leg rotates around a separate axis, against the resistance of the other leg."
post #14 of 16
I agree fulcrum turning is a key element in developing effective, functional inside leg action. Most skiers who have not mastered this turning power demonstrate difficulty releasing their downhill ski's inside edge and consequently resort to a rotary push-off mechanism to initiate their turns.

Whether we simply tip both feet to change edges as is arc to arc type turns or move along the rotary/edging spectrum to a pivot slips, fulcrum turning will quiet the upper body and promote leg rotation.
post #15 of 16
Fellas, I just finished our in house training a few weeks ago and the terms were straight from a clinic with Bob. Sorry for the confusion but we've used dual fulcrum leg steering to describe that maneuver here in PSIA-RM for about a decade. I guess I assumed it to be more universal than it is.

Neale,
Last time I checked fulcrum means pivot point so I am surprised by the confusion. Single fulcrum steering means the feet and the rest of the body are rotating around a single pivot point. Variations include turning the body around any pivot point within the base of support. Tip, tail, pole, hand, or in the example I was thinking about the pivot point is directly below the CoM and the body is rotating around it's midline vertical axis.
post #16 of 16
Makes sense, just never heard it referred to that way before! thanks for clarifying jasp!
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