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High Speed Crash! - Page 4

post #91 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
Put whatever you like underneath the cap. It doesnt matter. A cap design is a cap design...a torsion box is a cap ski.
just not the case

The cap design came from salomon years ago. It was also called a monocoque design.
post #92 of 110
A cap is a top and two sides. A box has a two sides a top and a bottom to carry the load.

While I agree that there is a lot of marketing terms going on, and my SGs with no visible external dampening of any kind are more stable than any chicken-heart skis, the Frequency in frequency tuning actually has meaning. They locate that material at the correct location to dampen vibrations at the ski's resonant frequency. The FT on the Fischer's really works.

BTW Davluri, you must have missed this thread http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...s+speed&page=2
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post #93 of 110
post #94 of 110
Alright, I am man enough to admit when I am wrong. Highway Star was right and I was wrong. Torsion box is not a 'pure' cap design using the original defintion of cap design. Torsion Box or not, however, the Mantra is not stiff enough to carve a clean arc on ice at speed. It just won't happen. If it was that stiff torsionally, it would be a horendous powder ski and would be garbage in the conditions it was primarily designed for.
post #95 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
Alright, I am man enough to admit when I am wrong. Highway Star was right and I was wrong. Torsion box is not a 'pure' cap design using the original defintion of cap design. Torsion Box or not, however, the Mantra is not stiff enough to carve a clean arc on ice at speed. It just won't happen. If it was that stiff torsionally, it would be a horendous powder ski and would be garbage in the conditions it was primarily designed for.
seriousally stop spewing **** you cant back up. torsional stiffness would have little affect on how a ski skis powder.
post #96 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
Alright, I am man enough to admit when I am wrong. Highway Star was right and I was wrong. Torsion box is not a 'pure' cap design using the original defintion of cap design. Torsion Box or not, however, the Mantra is not stiff enough to carve a clean arc on ice at speed. It just won't happen. If it was that stiff torsionally, it would be a horendous powder ski and would be garbage in the conditions it was primarily designed for.
Indeed, the mantra is a horrendous powder ski.
post #97 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
Indeed, the mantra is a horrendous powder ski.
No kidding...it's not a powder ski....ROFL....

MojoMan....again, what kind of bindings do you have and what are your bevels set at? IF you can't carve ice, those are the two main reasons.
post #98 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
the Mantra is not stiff enough to carve a clean arc on ice at speed. It just won't happen.
I can do it!

Get some skills Brah!
post #99 of 110
yup you still need sharp edges regardless. The darned fatties aren't as easy to get on edge though IMO (especially edge to edge). I think mine are set to 1/3 on the Mantras.
post #100 of 110

the demise of BS claims

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Hope to be getting one of those ski speedometers this Christmas, to finally know for sure just how fast I am going. I estimate at least 50mph.
don't do that R.R., what will happen to the myths of boasting Bears?

Reality will set in with a thump!
post #101 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
There has to be some amount of ice in that course if they prepped it properly. Mojoman is OWNED.
Prepped properly?? And you're saying other people here don't know what they're talking about? You really think the FIS spent weeks prepping that beer league/Nastar course? And you call that snow ice? I thought you skied in NE, on race stock bindings.

Nice try, tailgunner. Maybe now that you've had your ass handed to you here you'll disappear, just like you did after being humiliated on TGR.
post #102 of 110
I love this thread. Don't give a rip about all the technical jargon, but do love the speed arguments.

I've gone fast on road bikes (65+), skates (45+), and skis (60+). The bike and the skates were radar gunned. The ski speed was clocked last year with a GPS system at Breck. Don't know the name of the hill, but it is a groomed black run to the left facing the mountains. I cannot vouch for the validity of the GPS unit either.

I will say that I think it is possible and quite do-able under the right conditions. One other in our group clocked a speed of 82 MPH (135 KMH) on the same run. No other people around, and with lookouts at key spot on the course to warn of possible dangers (other skiers). I did not have the stones for that speed on my less that stellar equipment. I will say it was one of the coolest things I've seen on skis (FIS speeds at close range). Needless to say, his skill level was quite high (European junior racer). But he was NOT using race gear.

Point is, for me, anyone can go fast, and almost any ski can go fast. Whether or not it is smart or safe is another matter.

Sounds like the dude was having fun, and in the end, that is what matters, regardless of ski cap binding torsion rigidity pre release bull crap else you wanna put in here.
post #103 of 110
[quote=steelman;822813]. I was just at the last 10% of the apex of a turn (just before unweighting) when I hit a patch of ice:! My outside edge washed out and the slide for life was on.

Translation: I am just another banking park and rider who is not balanced on my skis and does not have the skill level to feel the snow and make the necessary instant adjustments to compensate for the change in snow conditions.

All of you speed king legends need to get a reality check before you kill someone. I dont care if you do it to yourself, that's just Darwin's way of thinning the herd.

Be like an Austrian, Dont talk, just ski
post #104 of 110
Thread Starter 
I take umberage to that remark. You dont know how I ski. This thread has gotten way out of hand and is mostly just Macho Bullsh%t at this point. I was going fast (under control at my home track) and I ate it. I did not put anyone in harms way and I was glad that I was not hurt. End of freaking thread!
post #105 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by saudan's boudoir View Post
Prepped properly?? And you're saying other people here don't know what they're talking about? You really think the FIS spent weeks prepping that beer league/Nastar course? And you call that snow ice? I thought you skied in NE, on race stock bindings.

Nice try, tailgunner. Maybe now that you've had your ass handed to you here you'll disappear, just like you did after being humiliated on TGR.
Last time I checked, ice exists in the west. Chances are they at least snow plowed that course, and maybe even threw down some salt.

Or do they race on packed powder in the west? ROFL.

Why don't you stick to pretending to be an extreme skier.....
post #106 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Last time I checked, ice exists in the west. Chances are they at least snow plowed that course, and maybe even threw down some salt.

Or do they race on packed powder in the west? ROFL.

Why don't you stick to pretending to be an extreme skier.....
One more time, HS, and perhaps I should speak slowly and wave my arms more. I'm told that sometimes this will help with comprehension.

That race course is a recreational NASTAR course. They run the groomers over it every night and set up the gates the next morning. That's it. No more "race prep" than that. No salt. No water injection. They might throw down some hydraulic fluid once in awhile, but that's only if one of the groomers has a leaky hose.

In fact, they don't treat that run any differently than they treat any other groomed run at JH. That means if it snows overnight, they groom the new snow and ithe race course is packed powder. This is pretty much standard operating procedure at any daily NASTAR course I've ever seen anywhere.

So, once again, while that footage definitely demonstrates that U P Racer can turn a pair of skis, it doesn't do much to demonstrate that Gotamas (or Mantras or whatever the fat ski in question was) are hot stuff on ice.

I would again invite you to take up Bushwackerinpa's invitation to join the Gathering in Utah in about a month. You might then be in a somewhat better position to make pronouncements about western skiing and snow conditions.
post #107 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
One more time, HS, and perhaps I should speak slowly and wave my arms more. I'm told that sometimes this will help with comprehension.

That race course is a recreational NASTAR course. They run the groomers over it every night and set up the gates the next morning. That's it. No more "race prep" than that. No salt. No water injection. They might throw down some hydraulic fluid once in awhile, but that's only if one of the groomers has a leaky hose.

In fact, they don't treat that run any differently than they treat any other groomed run at JH. That means if it snows overnight, they groom the new snow and ithe race course is packed powder. This is pretty much standard operating procedure at any daily NASTAR course I've ever seen anywhere.

So, once again, while that footage definitely demonstrates that U P Racer can turn a pair of skis, it doesn't do much to demonstrate that Gotamas (or Mantras or whatever the fat ski in question was) are hot stuff on ice.

I would again invite you to take up Bushwackerinpa's invitation to join the Gathering in Utah in about a month. You might then be in a somewhat better position to make pronouncements about western skiing and snow conditions.

That's lame as hell.....says alot about nastar.......

They still have to snowplow a course though, with packed powder it would rut up very quick.
post #108 of 110
Just curious Bob,
Around these parts by the end of the race the turns are scraped into ice. How do the Nastar courses look at the end of the day out west?
post #109 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Just curious Bob,
Around these parts by the end of the race the turns are scraped into ice. How do the Nastar courses look at the end of the day out west?
It really depends on the day.

If it has snowed a lot the night before, you get big ruts at all the gates. I've seen ruts that are more than knee deep, but in that situation it's not the "ice" that gets you, it's the chatter marks that don't go the right way.

If, on the other hand, it hasn't snowed for a few days, then all the turns get scraped off and polished and you approach what we in the west might call ice.

My own definition of ice, though, changed forever when I worked as a course crew volunteer at the 2002 Olympic Downhill at Snowbasin. The *worst* hard snow in the worst turns on the worst day of of our Jackson Hole NASTAR course would be considered unacceptably soft by those World Cup racers.

Those guys (and girls) can leave gaping trenches on granite countertops.
post #110 of 110
today at snowbird was a awesome hardpack day took out the Rc4 and had a blast leaving trenches everywhere. we never get east coast like east in the winter(except regulator) but once the spring hits snowbird get icey really icey in the morning. IMO its scarier than anything back east due to fall conquences on even some off our green runs like Big Emma and Lupine Loop.
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