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Are moguls too much for older skiers? - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post
It is completely unnecessary to get beat up to learn to ski moguls too a semi proficient level. That being said, many people are block heads and do not follow suggestions well. They venture in and assume you must eat a few before you can ski them well. Those who assume are destined for a date with the ibuprofen.

Flexibility is usually adequate for most people who are skiing in their 50's. I have a mogul instructor on staff who is 88 years old this year and flexibility is not in his bag of tricks. I is possible to ski moguls with near certainty of low impact day in and day out.

Blockhead? Strange way for an instructor to put it. Put yourself in their shoes. I don't see it as being a blockhead - most skiers are too timid when it comes to moguls to really follow the instructions and lesson correctly. For the most part, I believe it is lack of confidence and fear that holds one back and cause innefficincy and stress when it comes to moguls. Getting frustrated with students and calling them blockheads indicates a failure to understand where theyre coming from. Letting go and doing cannot be taught, it can only be experienced through the will. Most are going to have trouble just letting go. As an instructor you should see this and adapt - not just write them off as block heads.
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
Blockhead? Strange way for an instructor to put it. Put yourself in their shoes. I don't see it as being a blockhead - most skiers are too timid when it comes to moguls to really follow the instructions and lesson correctly. For the most part, I believe it is lack of confidence and fear that holds one back and cause innefficincy and stress when it comes to moguls. Getting frustrated with students and calling them blockheads indicates a failure to understand where theyre coming from. Letting go and doing cannot be taught, it can only be experienced through the will. Most are going to have trouble just letting go. As an instructor you should see this and adapt - not just write them off as block heads.
Oh come on now. I am talking about the Blockheads who don't take a lesson or who feel invincible after the lesson. During a low impact lesson there is little intimidation factor. That is how I teach. Don't blow it out of proportion.

I would guess the bulk of my students are at Carolinaskier's level
post #33 of 46
Dumbass blockheaded mofos.
post #34 of 46
Moguls are too much for fat Americans.

They are too much for anyone over 35.

It is so much easier being overweight and skiing on fat skis through cut-up conditions.

You need to be truly in-shape to ski bumps.
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisc View Post
Moguls are too much for fat Americans.

They are too much for anyone over 35.

It is so much easier being overweight and skiing on fat skis through cut-up conditions.

You need to be truly in-shape to ski bumps.
Jeez dude, the crowds in the bumps aren't that bad.
post #36 of 46
I wouldn't hesitate to learn to ski off-piste at any age. Bumps are just part of the whole picture. There is more than one way to get through a bump field. There are some very good suggestions posted here. I think the best thing you can do is to develop a solid foundation of basic skiing skills and then learn to apply them to all conditions. Being smooth and skiing with low impact is alot about learning to absorb terrain changes and keep your skis on the snow. If you do this you can "carve" in the bumps. You can also control speed by releasing your edges and skidding. At the end of the day its your turn size and shape that control your speed and staying balanced allows you to ski the terrian instead of the terrian skiing you. Before you tackle bumps you should be proficient at short radius turns with pole plants. I also think you should be reasonably good at things like pivot slips.. ie carving and skidding. You should be able to ski something groomed and steep at a slow speed with a consistant tempo. If you can do these things, I think you can safely learn to ski bumps. Also be ready to quit when you get tired. Don't push the terrain at the beginning or the end of the day. Have Fun.
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
Funny enough, I actually find that bumps make many steep runs easier to ski.
Yes, absolutely! Especially if it's icy, IMHO. There's nothing worse than a steep icy groomed run, I'd choose a steep icy bump run over that anyday. I'm not 53, but I'm not *that* much behind it either.
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
...

The guys here who are advocating zippering bumps don't have middle aged skeletons....
please stop with the generalizations. One of the best bumpers at my home mountain is around 69...............his line? Usually the zipper.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisc View Post
...

They are too much for anyone over 35.

...
my physical condition sux. But, then, I'm only 54, and many of the truly amazing bumpers I know are older than me. As for me, when I get to free ski, look for me at the Jane.
post #39 of 46
Icanseeformiles, the definition of a generalization is that it's true in general, on average. And it is. Obviously there are older folks who rock in moguls. Long ago I skied down a bump run a respectful distance behind Stein Erickson. He zippered like water flowing down a brook, talking the whole time to his friends. Must have been in his mid 70's at the time. But he had a lifetime of being one of the world's great skiers. Big difference between learning young with a young skeleton, sustaining technique into old age, and learning in middle age with a middle aged skeleton.

Unfortunately, if your 69 year old friend buries a tip while zippering, you and he will learn the difference 40 or 50 years makes in break risk or recovery time for a tear. Don't let pride get in the way of realism...
post #40 of 46

Mountain confidence

At any age, being unable to handle certain terrain undermines one's confidence on the mountain. (You will go around a new area thinking: I want to try the 'dipper', but what if it has bumps?) This sets an uneasy feeling in your gut and diminishes your adventurous side.

So, learning enough about bump skiing to handle them, even if it is not your favorite terrain or fun for you, opens up the whole mountain for you to explore. This sort of competence is easiest for an intermediate/adv skier to accomplish vis a vis lots of controlled sliding and skiing at an absolutely constant speed (no accelerations). Miss one turn and you might as well stop, because you have already blown that section.

Yes, moguls can be carved, but not by an intermediate.
post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
first part: depends on the moguls. moguls vary. ... you can ask a good skiers or instructors "how are the moguls on the face?", and they will know what you are asking.

second part: technique.. always take a lesson....

<snip>

Lastly, people keep tearing it up well beyond 50, but they prepare better. Bicycle, core work outs, stretching or yoga, warm ups before you get on the chair. Trust me, ya' gotta do it. Then you can keep rippin, anywhere you enjoy skiing, any time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Crab View Post
There's a lot of great high speed cruising at PCMR that is great fun for intermediates on up. Most of the bump runs run parrallel to groomers and meet at the lift.

Whether one is too old or not is largely a function of attitude and physical shape- there is no age limit on skiing like a teenager, but I know few people our age who zipperline bumps. Hucking cornices, sure. Tree skiing, you bet. Powder, absolutely. There's a whole school of bump sking that's fluid and relatively slow, making consistant round turns down the fallline. Most "grown ups" I know do it this way.
Generally, a softer, short turning ski works better in trees and bumps, but gives up stability at high speeds and edge grip on hard snow. We've had endless discussions on this in Gear threads and the ski that does it all is the holy grail. I found the Dynastar 8000 to be a good cheater-bump ski, and pretty good at everything else, but with a speed limit. Pretty darn good powder ski too, up to a foot or so. That's just an example. There are newer skis now, you need to find one that fits your ability and height/weight.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
if you have the desire to ski the bumps, get out there and do it! But with the help of a good coach you'll most likely reach your goals much quicker....


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post
... You are wrong about the need to get all beat up to learn bumps. I teach mogul clinics that are near zero physical impact on the knees. I am the mogul skier in the first vid and I am 52. I was completely exhausted and out of shape when I shot that vid.
I say, "Print the above posts. Read them regularly." It will help your mindset.



Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
At any age, being unable to handle certain terrain undermines one's confidence on the mountain. (You will go around a new area thinking: I want to try the 'dipper', but what if it has bumps?) This sets an uneasy feeling in your gut and diminishes your adventurous side.
And I say, "Memorize this paragraph."



On equipment: (Dating myself) I skied the old K2 Comp 710s back East. Their stiff tails helped me maintain stability on the ice. and their soft fronts allowed me to work the bumps. After moving to Colorado I skied them exactly two times ... and put them "up" in the garage.

I found that skiing bumps in the Rockies was (for me) counter-productive with a Slalom flexing board. (I felt like I was riding a bucking bronco on those things! The stiff tails kept throwing me too far forward ... I'd regain the middle and ... BOING!!! The stiff tails would launch my weight forward again. Super frustrating!)

I switched to a GS flex and immediately regained competence in the moguls. IOW, as already stated, your equipment choice matters, too.

Find a good bump Instructor (like Pierre). Take at least two Bumps Lessons each week you ski. You'll improve dramatically. (And far more pain-free than if you skipped the lessons.)

- KK
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisc View Post
Moguls are too much for fat Americans.

They are too much for anyone over 35.

It is so much easier being overweight and skiing on fat skis through cut-up conditions.

You need to be truly in-shape to ski bumps.
I am American.
I am slightly fat.
I am signficantly over 35.
Moguls are no more physically demanding for me than groomers.
I am in good shape (recently rode my bike 46 miles in under 2 hours alone).
I'm in terrible ski shape 'cause it's early.
I skied moguls all day yesterday easily (after running 4 miles early w/my dog).
Your logic is simplistic.
post #43 of 46
At 46, I'm not too old to ski moguls. However, my knees are 20 years too old to ski moguls.
post #44 of 46
at 49, I am as physically fit as I ever was, just a little slower on the stopwatch. I ski just like I did when i was 30. I ski the moguls all day long, top to bottom. (i'm a utah skier). And at the end of the day, my ski buddy and I, "turn it on", skiing the moguls as fast as possible, to get in the very last lift possible. when they had the Snowbird Peruvian lift going, that was were we tried to get completely spent, on the lower silver fox moguls and right down the all those intersting pitches right on the lower mtn.

thankfully, no injuries. a lifetime of yoga, and very wide cross training helps. plus xc all winter.
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
I see that you've doubled your days/year skiing since your post over in ski gear discussion. Makes a difference in terms of your question, IMO. If you ski a week a year, don't bother to stress over bumps. Take some lessons and your technique will get to where you can handle them when you must. If you ski two weeks a year, probably worth specifically learning different approaches. BUT:

The guys here who are advocating zippering bumps don't have middle aged skeletons. (But they will sooner than they realize ). I'm older than you, do bumps all the time because unless you time a big dump, interesting in-bounds terrain always, always has bumps somewhere. So if want the cool skiing, bumps are a necessary evil. And at times they can save your bacon (think glare ice groomed or refrozen in the trees) There are plenty of ways of skiing them smoothly, but first you'll need to get your groomed under control. Eg, lessons...

.......Right on man

there are always bumps somewhere and when the pow gets tracked out, theres nothing better then a nice soft zipper line........BOOYAH!
post #46 of 46

Go for it

Carolinaskiier,
My wife and I were in a situation similar to yours at 53, including having a son who was luring us into more difficult terrain. Now we're 61 and 59, comfortably skiing pretty much the whole mountain, and continuing to improve. So based on our experience I'd say give it a try. Lots of good advice in other posts, but what REALLY helped us was getting Lito Tejada-Flores' bump video and watching it over and over and over again. Good luck, rickp
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