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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Waxing right now - How much of the final coat to I scrape off?
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Waxing right now - How much of the final coat to I scrape off?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
: Waxing = messy

Should all the non-clear wax be remove?
post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggie216 View Post
: Waxing = messy

Should all the non-clear wax be remove?
Yes....scrape it all down...then buff em up....a brown paper bag works well.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
ok thanks.
post #4 of 26
It should not have any wax that you can see.
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
even if I cant see it, should there be any wax flakes if I continue to scrape it?
post #6 of 26
A few little little flecks of wax when you keep scraping is no big deal...dont worry about them.....just buff now....
post #7 of 26
Wax goes IN the base, not ON it....
post #8 of 26
Scrape enough so that brushing will expose the base structure.

If you can't see the base structure, or it's totally flat and a brush sticks to it, keep scraping/brushing.

The brush should glide, like the ski should glide over the snow.
post #9 of 26
Meh, scraping is optional. Just go ski, it will scrape off on its own in about 2000 vertical.
post #10 of 26
Trolling again?
post #11 of 26
Not me. I just think scraping wax is for suckers. Unless you are racing.
post #12 of 26
If you don't scrape and expose the sructure, your skiis will feel stuck to the snow.

If you ski real snow, as opposed to the east, It won't matter so much.

I like to have slippery skis. I scrape.
post #13 of 26
There is NO valid argument for not scraping wax.... must be a troll!
post #14 of 26
All of me..why not take all of me..Willie Nelson


Actually if you don't get it all the world won't end.

I scraped properly for years. then a friend showed up with skis he forgot to scrape. I would have thought it would be a disaster, but they were faster than my skis, and after a few runs they were beautifully scraped anyway.
post #15 of 26
Upon reading some positive experiences by others here I once tried my skies out without scraping......felt like I had glue on the base, no good.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
If you don't scrape and expose the sructure, your skiis will feel stuck to the snow.

If you ski real snow, as opposed to the east, It won't matter so much.

I like to have slippery skis. I scrape.
I had the opposite experience. Never had a problem with unscraped skis here in the mid-Atlantic, but I had a problem at the top of Snowbird. I had to remove my board and scape the wax off before I could go. Definitely depends on conditions. Maybe snow temp, texture? I haven't skipped scraping since that incident. Now I brush after scraping.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
Meh, scraping is optional. Just go ski, it will scrape off on its own in about 2000 vertical.
Watch out Tim, sometimes that won't work. Unless you want to shuffle down the first 2000 vert.
post #18 of 26
Definitely don't scrape and brush for a powder day. Then I'll beat you to the goods.

Quote:
Mine, mine, mine, mine.......
(the seagulls on Finding Nemo)
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Watch out Tim, sometimes that won't work. Unless you want to shuffle down the first 2000 vert.
I have never had a noticeable issue not scraping. But I suppose on a powder day it might not work as well since the sharper snow will cause more drag and it might take longer to scour the wax off. It might seem that my skis are going slower for the first run but after that fine. How long it takes depends on what wax you use, snow conditions, etc...

I guess it works well for me for a couple reasons:

1. I only use very small amounts of wax so I don't have rivers of wax running down my skis. I used to use much more when I was dripping. Now I apply wax using the dab and rub / crayon method for hot waxing. Much more efficient wax use.

2. The final step for me in waxing is sticking a lint free paper towel to the bottom of the iron, and running the down the ski to soak up any excess wax. IT leaves a really smooth thin layer that is typically scraped clean by the time I get out of the lift corral at the top of the hill on my first run.

I discovered this methods first day of the season a couple of years ago when I just brought out my skis with the thick summer time wax layer and then just went and skied forgetting to scrape. I didn't notice that I had forgot to scrape till I got home, had not any issues while skiing. I never scraped of brushed again.

Actually, thats not true. Sometimes I will scrape them out at lunch or apres ski brush out the structure if there is still a tiny bit of wax remaining, this happens maybe once a season only if I wax with an unusually thick layer of hard wax and it happens to be a warm day.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by DropCliffsNotBombs View Post
There is NO valid argument for not scraping wax.... must be a troll!
The argument is that I find it its unnecessary and thus a waste of time. And if you don't scrape there is less clean up and you can wax your skis more quickly which means more frequent waxing which means better over a whole skis season. And you don't need to worry about having additional tools like a scraper of brush. And you can wax your skis in the carpeted spare bedroom with out making a mess of wax shaving all over the place that are nearly impossible to get out of the carpet.

You sound like the troll to me sucka!
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
I guess it works well for me
That's all that really matters.

Finding your own preferences takes some time and experimentation.

Skate skiing has sensitized my feel for glide (or at least I think it does) to where I just scrape (after hot scraping, not liquids) and then roto brush in seconds as a rule. It's easy, quick & 'I think' I'm faster and certainly feels like the glide is smoother and faster than when I don't. What that equates to in actual speed difference is not night and day, however, but it is better and is my preference that adds to my enjoyment. YMMV. (Plus I like the finished sheen and general appearance of the bases.)

The abrasiveness of the snow will definitely affect how long it takes to wear off unscraped wax.
post #22 of 26
Oh crap, here we go again:

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...&highlight=wax

I have to back Tim up on this one. After years of scraping, I frequently skip it and ski the wax off. The first 20-50 feet feel sticky, but then the skis are clean and fast within a very short distance. I remember checking one morning when I skied down from my car to a trailside lodge to hit the bathroom, and the bases were already smooth at that point. I don't think I went any farther than 200 feet and 2-3 turns. I honestly cannot tell the difference between times when I scrape and brush at home and times I ski the wax off.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
Oh crap, here we go again:

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...&highlight=wax

I have to back Tim up on this one. After years of scraping, I frequently skip it and ski the wax off. The first 20-50 feet feel sticky, but then the skis are clean and fast within a very short distance. I remember checking one morning when I skied down from my car to a trailside lodge to hit the bathroom, and the bases were already smooth at that point. I don't think I went any farther than 200 feet and 2-3 turns. I honestly cannot tell the difference between times when I scrape and brush at home and times I ski the wax off.
Maybe it's a mid-Atlantic thing. I never did much scrape or buff either. The hardpack does it in about one run.
post #24 of 26
skier219, et al, skiing parking lots to scrape the wax off your bases is general considered a no-no. It it is however, and excellent method to impart aggressive structure to them.
post #25 of 26
Perhpas the difference is that in the midatlantic the average day time high in January at many mountains is 40F which basically means that out midwinter conditions are closer to spring conditions everywhere else. The snow is always hard and icy dense and abrasive especially on that first run of the morning. For what its worth my old Volkl Cross skis used to get base burn on the edges after half a day arcing turns because the bases were so soft and the snow so abrasive. It didn't really matter what I did wax wise.
post #26 of 26
Yeah, plus we are skiing mostly on man made in the mid-Atlantic, not real snow crystals. It wasn't a powder day when I found myself at the top of Snowbird on a snowboard that wouldn't slide. I had been trained to carry a scraper with me, which came in handy that day, but a stiff plastic card from your wallet will do. Eventually you will find yourself on snow where your unscraped skis will not go. Mastercard = Priceless.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Waxing right now - How much of the final coat to I scrape off?