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Prep Wax Why Scrape?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Had my RX8s stone ground and am in the process of waxing them. I have wax them four times. I usually crayon on the wax to reduce scraping and save on wax.

A thought came to me. Why do we scrape between successive waxings(with the same wax)? My understanding is that with each waxing, more(although a small amount) wax is absorbed into the base. Why not just keep ironing the wax in, instead of scraping and applying more wax?
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by fischermh View Post
Why do we scrape between successive waxings(with the same wax)? My understanding is that with each waxing, more(although a small amount) wax is absorbed into the base. Why not just keep ironing the wax in, instead of scraping and applying more wax?
A. Helps to pull off microhairs and dirt.
B. Smooths the (micro) roughness from the stonegrinding process and makes the base faster.
post #3 of 12
Ever try to patch a nail hole with spackling compound? Sometimes takes 2 or three passes to fill it up, it keeps pulling out and or retracts/shrinks once dry. I can see there being some similarity with wax and pores in the ski (but maybe not). I would also imagine the mechanical action of scraping helps burnish the wax into the bases.

Build or buy a Hot box and do away with a million waxings, one shot of base one shot of daily prep some brushing and your good to go.
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by NE1 View Post
A. Helps to pull off microhairs and dirt.


Each scraping cleans out a bit more dirt & stuff so that the next wax application goes on a cleaner surface for better absorption/adhesion. If you just kept ironing in the same wax, you would just be moving the same stuff around.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Even if you scrub the skis with scotch brite pads to remove the hairs prior to waxing, and followed up with hot scraping to remove dirt?
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by fischermh View Post
Even if you scrub the skis with scotch brite pads to remove the hairs prior to waxing, and followed up with hot scraping to remove dirt?
I have read it argued by some expert tuners that the pads actually create more hairs than fix them......I never took a microscope or jeweler's loop to the base to verify this one way or the other. FWIW I do use the pads as part of my surface prep after a repair but always some scraping and brushing to finish things off. My .02
post #7 of 12
Unless these are race only skis, why bother... you won't notice any difference.

Wax them and ski them. they'll be fast enough. If you want a better glide use better wax.

It my opinion that people spend to much time waxing tuning there skis.

I touch mine up after every ski day with a 100 grit MoonFlex followed by a 200 grit MoonFlex. I use a 6 inch file only when I feel the need to. I'll wax with Dominator HyperZoom every few days. I have over 90 days on my skis and they have only been stone ground one time. The bottoms have a few nicks and small holes, but they ski great and glide easy.

You don't need perfect bases.

My daily touch up takes less then 10 minutes.

IMO All the talk about removing P-Tex hairs is a bunch of fu fu Who cares. We're just recreational skiers, not World Cup racers.

My skis go fast enough to scare me. I don't need to go any faster.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
I have read it argued by some expert tuners that the pads actually create more hairs than fix them......I never took a microscope or jeweler's loop to the base to verify this one way or the other.
I have heard the same about pads; OK for first pass after the (antiquated) belt-grind process, but not for a (much smoother and better finished) stonegrind. Not sure, but I don't use them anymore.
post #9 of 12
After a stone grind I will hot scrape once or twice with ultra-cheap shop wax and then use a fair amount of base prep. rather than scraping the base prep between coats, ill re-iron it 3 or 4 times with 20 minutes or so in between and i do find that the bases accept a lot of the wax that would otherwise be wasted.
post #10 of 12
I like to keep it simple and easy..wax, cork and brush and off you go. I honestly havn't bothered scraping in years and cannot tell the difference.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
I have read it argued by some expert tuners that the pads actually create more hairs than fix them......I never took a microscope or jeweler's loop to the base to verify this one way or the other. FWIW I do use the pads as part of my surface prep after a repair but always some scraping and brushing to finish things off. My .02
You may have heard mixed opinions because there are different grades of pads. For example my 3 pad set has a non-abrasive, a moderately abrasive and an abrasive pad.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
I have read it argued by some expert tuners that the pads actually create more hairs than fix them......I never took a microscope or jeweler's loop to the base to verify this one way or the other. FWIW I do use the pads as part of my surface prep after a repair but always some scraping and brushing to finish things off. My .02
For those really into tuning, using an Omni-Prep pad removes those tiny mirco hairs caused by stonegrinding without creating new ones. Tognar Tools sells them. White "non-abrasive" fibertex sold at ski racing shops is comparable. Haven't seen Dr. D's non-abrasive, but he is correct that there are different grades of fibertex and regular Scotchbrite isn't the best one to use if you are trying to eliminate those pesky micro-hairs. They do exist and will slow the ski down though most of us in most conditions likely wouldn't notice the difference.
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