or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New Neox taking water!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi,
Yesterday I tried my new metron 11B5 and had a very bad surprise with the bindings.
In the middle of the day, I decided to modify the Din setting and I noticed that a lot of snow and humidity has entered inside the binding making the reading of the Din impossible. I looked at both binding (in case there is a problem only with one), but both had the same problem.
I have the Neox 310 form last year (but they are new and not used)
Is this normal? (if it is the case, they just suck!) Or is there a problem only with mine (very odd to have the same problem on both binding ! )
post #2 of 14
I am pretty sure they are not supposed to be watertight, I get moisture in all of my bindings. You set the DIN when dry at the start of the season and forget it, no need to keep looking at it.
post #3 of 14
no binding is designed to be watertight- some designs are more resistant than others, but all are made to get wet. The bigger question is why you spontaneously decided to adjust DIN settings?
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takecontrol618 View Post
no binding is designed to be watertight- some designs are more resistant than others, but all are made to get wet. The bigger question is why you spontaneously decided to adjust DIN settings?
/\ /\ /\ /\ what he said:
post #5 of 14
FWIW, my Neox (both pair) had this "issue". They were designed that way, as I understand it.

...and I third the question... be careful about those "spontaneous adjustments", especially in chunky snow...
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you your answers. I’m reassured.
My wif’s Salomon’s Bindings (the one that comes with the Siam Origin) didn’t have this problem. The Din could be read very easely.
Why changing the Din settings? Well, when I bought my skis, the ski man asked for my weight and my level. Told him I’m 160 lbs with an expert level. When I got the skis, the setting were on 9.5 !!
So I changed the value to 8.5 ( I did it myself because the shop wanted me to signe a whole bunch of paper and they had to perfom additionnal testings).
Then, when I was on the slopes, I decided to go with 7.5. Why? Because if you’re not well preapared enough, I think it’s better to start the season with a lower Din setting (and I realised my leggs are not at there best on the slopes). I have a season pass and will ski a lot this year. During summer I didn’t have the chance to do enough exercise, and righ now my muscles are less fit than after a few weeks of sking. So basicly I think it’s better for me to go easy at first (lower Din), and after a while increase from 7.5 to 8.5.
If in a few weeks, I start pushing really hard on thouse skis, and my boot is released, I’ll definitly have to go to a higher Din on the slopes.
post #7 of 14
Store your skis somewhere warm and dry, like the boiler room, any moisture in there should dry up by the time you are ready to hit the slopes again...unless of course you are skiing everyday.
post #8 of 14
They aren't designed to be water proof, but they will dry out if given a chance. They are designed with a very accurate din setting though. Individually tested in the factory and then the markings are lasered in place to correspond to the actual test. If I was you I would leave it alone. A prerelease can be just as dangerous as too late a release. Did you have a fall where you think they should have come but didn't?
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin92 View Post
Thank you your answers. I’m reassured.
My wif’s Salomon’s Bindings (the one that comes with the Siam Origin) didn’t have this problem. The Din could be read very easely.
Why changing the Din settings? Well, when I bought my skis, the ski man asked for my weight and my level. Told him I’m 160 lbs with an expert level. When I got the skis, the setting were on 9.5 !!
So I changed the value to 8.5 ( I did it myself because the shop wanted me to signe a whole bunch of paper and they had to perfom additionnal testings).
Then, when I was on the slopes, I decided to go with 7.5. Why? Because if you’re not well preapared enough, I think it’s better to start the season with a lower Din setting (and I realised my leggs are not at there best on the slopes). I have a season pass and will ski a lot this year. During summer I didn’t have the chance to do enough exercise, and righ now my muscles are less fit than after a few weeks of sking. So basicly I think it’s better for me to go easy at first (lower Din), and after a while increase from 7.5 to 8.5.
If in a few weeks, I start pushing really hard on thouse skis, and my boot is released, I’ll definitly have to go to a higher Din on the slopes.
Your boot sole length is a key component of your correct DIN Setting and your height plays into it also.

I have a current Atomic DIN chart.

What is your height?

What is your boot sole length in mm? (it's marked on the lateral side of the sole back by the heel)

Give me those #'s and I'll tell you what the chart says.

What boots are you skiing on?
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
RiCB, I didn’t fall. I just wanted to set the Din for easier release just in case.

Atomicman,
Thanks for your help,
Actually the ski shop used the same chart to come up with a Din setting of 9.5 . He asked for my level and I choosed the maximum level avaible on that chart.
I’m 5’6” , 160 lbs, and my boots are the Head XS ( http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=31369 )
Don’t have access to my boots righ now, but will provide the sole lenth as soon as I get a chance.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin92 View Post
RiCB, I didn’t fall. I just wanted to set the Din for easier release just in case.

Atomicman,
Thanks for your help,
Actually the ski shop used the same chart to come up with a Din setting of 9.5 . He asked for my level and I choosed the maximum level avaible on that chart.
I’m 5’6” , 160 lbs, and my boots are the Head XS ( http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=31369 )
Don’t have access to my boots righ now, but will provide the sole lenth as soon as I get a chance.
If your boot is between 291-310mm a III+ skier would be a 9.5 on the chart, a III skier would be 8

If they are 271-290 III+ would be 10, a III would be 8.5.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Atomicman, just realised that you were the one providing me those precious information on my boots back in 2005. Thanks again.

Do you know what’s the difference between the level III+ and level III ?
post #13 of 14
Skier agressiveness, speed, terrain and age.
post #14 of 14
Kevin aside from the moisture issue, what do you think of the bindings?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion