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MA Open to comments

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
This was shot at our local bump.

Early season but wanted some input on what looks right and what looks way off.

Wondering what people thought about the amount I am squated or leaned forward. I'm starting to think it's too much but yet it gets the job done.

Low Rez
http://media.putfile.com/Rabitt-Hill-Dec-2007

High Rez
http://media.putfile.com/Rabitt-Hill-Dec-2007
post #2 of 30
Care to share a bit more about your goals, your focus, what you'd like to accomplish this year, what your thoughts about the different skis are, and so on?

Quite a difference from the videos I first remember you posting here!

BTW, what's up with those poles?
post #3 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Care to share a bit more about your goals, your focus, what you'd like to accomplish this year, what your thoughts about the different skis are, and so on?

Quite a difference from the videos I first remember you posting here!

BTW, what's up with those poles?
Goals, to become as good a skier as I can. Will likely take my CSIA Level 1 this year and likely the Coaching level 1 late this year or next.

Right now my focus is on proper pole plant timing, I have always had a late plant, and thanks to some help from last years video MA I think I have a better arm position and plant but the timing still feels off and (excuse the pun) retarded (late).

I have really been feeling squated or too low and would really like thoughts from everyone what they think.

My focus this year is to get better down hill weighted ski, I tend to ski too much on the uphill ski. I also want to improve in my Adult League Racing and I want at least top 3 in GS and 1st place in SL.

Now sure what you mean by the pole comment. I assume you think they are too short? They are short because if longer I feel like my hands are above my head, which I think is a simptom of being too squated?

Thanks for the compliment, I really can't say how much the Bears input has helped the last few years but also I think it's a testament to what proper fitting and performance boots and ski's can do for someone.
post #4 of 30
It looks to me as if you aren't controlling your poles. When they touch, they go flying behind you. You can keep them under more control, and if you do they are less likely to interrupt your flow or pull you off balance a bit. Which I think they are doing.

Thanks for the expansion. That should give the coaches here some focus for their comments...
post #5 of 30
1st run on Atomic SX10s:

It appears that you are not getting pressure towards the tips, and that as a result, they are not pulling you into the turns.

My favorite set of feet and ski movements is in the flush (those smaller, quicker turns near the end), because you keep everything moving and aren't wasting a lot of movement.

I do think that, for the most part, you're not allowing the pressure to move to the outside ski. This could be because you're not allowing it to get off the inside, for example by not getting it out of the way. It could be because you are more comfortable keeping your base of support under you rather than out to the side. This is likely why the smaller turns (the "flush") are higher quality.

I'd like to see you balanced more along the inside edge of your outside ski, starting early in the turns, and progressing until you begin moving off it as you prepare for the next turn somewhere after the fall line.

...and get those poles under your control...
post #6 of 30
Not looking at the other comments here's 2 my observations:
1. Your poles.
I think they are too long and out of control. Get your hands in front of you. I would steer pretty far away from you if coming up from behind.

2. Inside ski.
I think your balance is off. Way to much weight on your inside ski.

The first longer turns are quite allright. Then it all goes wrong. It may well be overdoing that "low COM offloading skis" transition (which I don't know what it's called in english) that causes the problem.
Try completing the turns.

I know you are saying bump up here, but I can't see no bumps? Are we talking about moguls?
Then I would not try to carve it at all actually.
post #7 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl R View Post
Not looking at the other comments here's 2 my observations:
1. Your poles.
I think they are too long and out of control. Get your hands in front of you. I would steer pretty far away from you if coming up from behind.
Too short, wow : Using the standard method, upside down pole, hand under the basket my arm is already larger than 90 degrees. this method would put me in one size larger pole, maybe even two. Maybe hard to tell but likely because I am too far forward, or too crouched?

Out of control poles and hands in front. Will work on that thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl R View Post
2. Inside ski.
I think your balance is off. Way to much weight on your inside ski.

The first longer turns are quite allright. Then it all goes wrong. It may well be overdoing that "low COM offloading skis" transition (which I don't know what it's called in english) that causes the problem.
Try completing the turns.

I know you are saying bump up here, but I can't see no bumps? Are we talking about moguls?
Then I would not try to carve it at all actually.
Thanks for noticing the uphill ski weighting, I saw it as well once I watched the vid and I felt it all day.

Have to work on that.

Completing turns: another bad habit of throwing my feet into the next turn too fast. I must relax at the end and inbetween turns.

Bumps :The light was really really flat today, and I forgot my goggles and had to wear my glasses. Weak excuse, but was sort of blind.

Thanks for the input.
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb View Post
Too short, wow : Using the standard method, upside down pole, hand under the basket my arm is already larger than 90 degrees. this method would put me in one size larger pole, maybe even two. Maybe hard to tell but likely because I am too far forward, or too crouched?
No I think they look too long. But that may be because of the way you use them. They might be just correct.
Actually, disregard the length comment until your hands are more like Bodes here: http://www.sportskool.com/videos/carving

Is this roughly what you are aiming for? (I mean all in all)
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=9PVUYqT314k
post #9 of 30
marmout mb, I remember you from last year, boy are you rippin now . How do you feel yourselfe? I think that looks fantastic. Great progress even though this is on slightly different terrain.

No, your poles are not too long but you keep pointing them forwards and that makes them look short and like you need to be reaching down. Same problem as you had last year. Also they keep bouncing off the snow. Check out HH's pole plant drills, you need first to drop the pole plant completely out of your skiing and bring it back in in a proper manner.
post #10 of 30
Marmotmb,

Hey, some nice skiing. I only viewed the first 120 sec, but rippin.

From what I see, it looks like you are rushing things (espically in the short turns) and not allowing the skis to engage.

In the longer turns, your extention onto new outside ski moves your CM up and over a flat ski and it is not effectivally edged until approching the fall line (too late). Think of early edge engagement, not early weight engagement. This will calm things down as you move through the transition and into the new turn. To engage your edges early in the turn, instead of extending up and on the new outside ski, flex your old outside leg as you pass over your skis and move your CM down and around the new turn. Your body will know what to do as far as staying balanced from ski to ski.
To sum it up, be more patient in the transition and it will feel like time starts slowing down all through the turn.

The same goes for the short turns. They are better as you slow down the movements and move more with the skis. Where you drop to the inside is where you are forcing the turn too much and not riding the skis.
The pole action in the shorter turns is from the slight bow or bend at the waist. Work on standing a little taller or more sholders back. This will force you to flex the ankles a little more to stay in balance instead of bending at the waist.

On the longer turns, plant the tip of the pole farther down the hill as you pass over your skis in the transition. Again, patience is a virtue in skiing. I enjoyed your skiing in the vid. It is exciting and very playfull. Keep on rippin'.

RW
post #11 of 30
Lower body looks good! Upper body flailing a bit. Left arm seems like the main culprit. Elbows in a bit. Light touch. Even no touch. Even Bode looks like he is forcing his hands to "do the right thing" with his poles for the purposes of the video.
post #12 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
marmout mb, I remember you from last year, boy are you rippin now . How do you feel yourselfe? I think that looks fantastic. Great progress even though this is on slightly different terrain.

No, your poles are not too long but you keep pointing them forwards and that makes them look short and like you need to be reaching down. Same problem as you had last year. Also they keep bouncing off the snow. Check out HH's pole plant drills, you need first to drop the pole plant completely out of your skiing and bring it back in in a proper manner.
Thanks for the kind words. these were not my strongest runs of the day, but that is the point to find the flaws. Racing starts tonight so in the next few weeks I will have some gate video as well. Both GS and SL

I can clearly see now that the poles need to be more controlled, I am going to give this alot of attention. I think I need to be shown how to move my hands or wrists I think this is where alot of the problem lies, as well as get my hands closer into my body and not out as wings as much. I think the wings come from a balance issue.

I will try some skiing without poles.
post #13 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post
Marmotmb,

Hey, some nice skiing. I only viewed the first 120 sec, but rippin.

From what I see, it looks like you are rushing things (espically in the short turns) and not allowing the skis to engage.

In the longer turns, your extention onto new outside ski moves your CM up and over a flat ski and it is not effectivally edged until approching the fall line (too late). Think of early edge engagement, not early weight engagement. This will calm things down as you move through the transition and into the new turn. To engage your edges early in the turn, instead of extending up and on the new outside ski, flex your old outside leg as you pass over your skis and move your CM down and around the new turn. Your body will know what to do as far as staying balanced from ski to ski.
To sum it up, be more patient in the transition and it will feel like time starts slowing down all through the turn.

The same goes for the short turns. They are better as you slow down the movements and move more with the skis. Where you drop to the inside is where you are forcing the turn too much and not riding the skis.
The pole action in the shorter turns is from the slight bow or bend at the waist. Work on standing a little taller or more sholders back. This will force you to flex the ankles a little more to stay in balance instead of bending at the waist.

On the longer turns, plant the tip of the pole farther down the hill as you pass over your skis in the transition. Again, patience is a virtue in skiing. I enjoyed your skiing in the vid. It is exciting and very playfull. Keep on rippin'.

RW
Great stuff, thanks.

I'll be making some regular video posts over the season. Lets see if I can put some of this great advice to work.
post #14 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer256 View Post
Lower body looks good! Upper body flailing a bit. Left arm seems like the main culprit. Elbows in a bit. Light touch. Even no touch. Even Bode looks like he is forcing his hands to "do the right thing" with his poles for the purposes of the video.
You know I really even question to validity of poles for fun carving.

Oh boy have I opened a can of worms

It boggles me how some people can keep their arms and poles so quiet. Again I think I have some bad action ingrained in my head that I can't shake and have a hard time changing. More work required. Dammit I have to go skiing some more:

Thanks for the input.
post #15 of 30
Thread Starter 
This was stated by Ron White

"Work on standing a little taller or more sholders back. This will force you to flex the ankles a little more to stay in balance instead of bending at the waist."

Question for everyone:

Would perhaps using a longer pole (proper size) be a good tool to get me to stand up taller?

Again I am using a pole that is one - two sizes smaller than it should be.
post #16 of 30
I don't think it will matter that much. (I might be wrong, I've been that before )
What I think will do good is getting your hands up in sight.

Have you looked at the short turn video I found on youtube?
post #17 of 30
Thread Starter 
Carl R: Have you looked at the short turn video I found on youtube?

yes I did, the turns were nice, there was evident downhill weighting on each turn. I can and probably should have done some short (Not flush) turns for the camera.

When I get these turns right they always feel the best. I always get this feeling of being on the verge of getting tossed downhill and that my knees are going to get jerked if I make one wrong move, and hence am hesitant to do them sometimes in certain snow conditions.

The hands l poling looked odd to me, but again with new carving poling takes on a whole new aspect. IN that vid it was more of a sideways taping, more so that the traditional fore and aft poling. to me it looked like the skiers poles were too long and hence could not make a traditional or fore aft pole movement and in turn made what was possible (side ways tapping)

PS that Bode video is exceptional. Good tool, will be watching that many times over, and over and over.

Here is a video that I found that the poling looks great. As I am Canadian (and I know there are some differances between PSIA and CSIA movements) this is the type of skiing I see most often. God EG near the end of the video of the carving.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh4OlRf1P8U
post #18 of 30
Nah. Poles shmoles. They are along for the ride and balance. It is more about the movement than the touch.

my .02. I am sure some of the very very well qualified members here may disagree.
post #19 of 30
marmot mb,

Quote:
It boggles me how some people can keep their arms and poles so quiet. Again I think I have some bad action ingrained in my head that I can't shake and have a hard time changing. More work required. Dammit I have to go skiing some more:

Don't sweat the poles or the small stuff. Work on a smooth, direct turn entry.

Quote:
"Work on standing a little taller or more sholders back. This will force you to flex the ankles a little more to stay in balance instead of bending at the waist."
Remember this is not technique, but a verbal cue for marmot mb and him only, unless that skier also folds a little at the waist.

RW
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb View Post
Here is a video that I found that the poling looks great. As I am Canadian (and I know there are some differances between PSIA and CSIA movements) this is the type of skiing I see most often. God EG near the end of the video of the carving.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh4OlRf1P8U
I'm Swedish.
That kind of pole movements are perfect for that kind of skiing. I think that it's not necessary to plant the poles that firm while carving. First the position is lower, second carving is probably faster. Planting the poles that way will likely upset your upper body.

Here's something perhaps? Pole planting lessons with mr Bode.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KAtSx0SnPs
post #21 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
marmout mb, I remember you from last year, boy are you rippin now . How do you feel yourselfe? I think that looks fantastic. Great progress even though this is on slightly different terrain.

No, your poles are not too long but you keep pointing them forwards and that makes them look short and like you need to be reaching down. Same problem as you had last year. Also they keep bouncing off the snow. Check out HH's pole plant drills, you need first to drop the pole plant completely out of your skiing and bring it back in in a proper manner.
Missed your comment, your input has been beneficial in the past. Thanks for the compliment.

How do I feel myself?

To be honest I feel out of balance nearing the end of the turns. I feel akward making the begining of the next turn ( initiating it, again out of balance till the edges hook in) and I feel way too squated down and over.

I also feel so mechanical or robotic at the end of the turns, but this video shows I am not keeping my shoulders square to the fall line enough, which I think hurts the downhill ski weighting.

As always lots of great stuff for me from this thread I can't wait to get back out practice and make another vid.
post #22 of 30
The poles are a bit out of control, but I think that point reached home.

Also you are trying very hard to get high edge angles, but you develop the outside edge angle by A-framing over a highly engaged (and diverging) inside ski. Thus you never really get early edge engagement and your carving is not very precise through much of the turn. As Ron indicated, get an early outside edge engagement, but do not use the inside ski to "help you turn". Initially do not use the inside ski much at all, to get a feel for a solid outside edge.
post #23 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post
The poles are a bit out of control, but I think that point reached home.

Also you are trying very hard to get high edge angles, but you develop the outside edge angle by A-framing over a highly engaged (and diverging) inside ski. Thus you never really get early edge engagement and your carving is not very precise through much of the turn. As Ron indicated, get an early outside edge engagement, but do not use the inside ski to "help you turn". Initially do not use the inside ski much at all, to get a feel for a solid outside edge.
I am sort of hearing perhaps some drills of not using the uphill ski at all or much to gain the feeling of more downhill orientated.

Thanks for the input.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb View Post
Will likely take my CSIA Level 1 this year and likely the Coaching level 1 late this year or next.
For the CSIA 1 course, your free skiing will be evaluated within three "core competencies" described briefly as:

1) Centred stance (fore/aft: you're doing pretty well here).
2) Outside ski, parallel skis (outside ski is the key item for you to work on).
3) Separation (see it sometimes, will also need some work).

There a bunch of other things to complete the technical model, and low-end skiing too, but that should give you some food for thought. Overall, you're a good strong skier, and over the four days of the course, you should be able to progress towards meeting the requirements. Stay open to suggestions, and try your best to follow the guidance from the course conductors. If you haven't seen it already, there's some online material that will help you familiarize yourself with the course (see
http://www.snowpro.com/csia/info/e/e_prep1.html)

On the CSCF side, developments over the past couple of years have consciously aligned a lot of terminology and the technical model between CSIA and CSCF, so you'll have a base to build on. The obvious difference is that the CSCF applies the model towards a high performance outcome. Again, there will be some things to add, but your video shows some good material to work with.
post #25 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogulmuncher View Post
3) Separation (see it sometimes, will also need some work).
Could you perhaps tell me at what time / times in the video you see proper seperation. perhaps mention if it was the high or low rez version in case the times are different.

I don't think I fully understand this, perhaps seeing it may enlighten me to what I should try for.

Thanks for the feedback.
post #26 of 30
For your goals, mogulmucher has the best response. I'll add what I think is missing -- pivotting. CSIA is NOT about strong edging. The Basic CSIA turn is a round turn with pivotting throughout the turn, not just at the top.

What they like to see, is ROUND TURNS, STEERED FROM TOP TO BOTTOM. STEERED WITH THE LEGS ONLY, NO UPPER BODY INVOLVEMENT. Poles are planted when skis go flat.

Pivot slips is what you should focus on performing, holding the poles horizontally in front of the body. If you slow down a pivot slip, and add a bit of edge, plant at flat, you're at the basic parallel turn. You won't get it without showing the pivotting.

All that being said, you'll likely make it through level 1 CSIA.
post #27 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
CSIA is NOT about strong edging. The Basic CSIA turn is a round turn with pivotting throughout the turn, not just at the top.

What they like to see, is ROUND TURNS, STEERED FROM TOP TO BOTTOM. STEERED WITH THE LEGS ONLY, NO UPPER BODY INVOLVEMENT. Poles are planted when skis go flat.

Pivot slips is what you should focus on performing, holding the poles horizontally in front of the body. If you slow down a pivot slip, and add a bit of edge, plant at flat, you're at the basic parallel turn. You won't get it without showing the pivotting.

All that being said, you'll likely make it through level 1 CSIA.
I know of the movements you are speaking of, my next video I will demonstrate (or at least attempt) this type of skiing. I think I do this somewhat well.

I once had an instructor ask me to ski, so he could watch me before the lesson.

I asked him "how would you like me to ski" he looked at me seriously perplexed (CSIA brainwashing was causing short circuits)

He said well there is only one way. I chuckled and proceeded to show him what he wanted to see.

I am a true beleiver that there is many ways to ski, many feelings that can be acheived but at the same time there are proper ways to do all of them.

I guess my style I was doing in that video was a mix of racing and fun piste skiing (which I would call aggresive carving). I wasn't trying to do the CSIA jiggle.

Regardless of the many styles there are common points to all of it that require a solid base to then modify the end result. I do feel I lack ( at least full competency) in many of the base area's though.

I do understand though that when doing CSIA or instructing CSIA their guidelines and style is comformed to to produce a consistent product regardless of the instructor you receive.

I think my mix of racing and CSIA may be a tough combination, but I am willing to try and fail. Cause through it all I am still skiing.

I had racing tonight and was reminded yet again of the disciplines that are common and those that are totally different. I had a riot, got my fix of some fast runs and can't wait to get back out and do it all over again.

Thanks for the input, good points. Steering is always important.
post #28 of 30
Evaluating from the feet upward...'cuz the ski/snow interaction is what it's all about.

--Why is your stance so wide? A stance that wide makes it much harder to retract your inside leg. More weight on the outside ski makes it bend more for better turning. Try a stance that is walking-width wide. Drill with the tail of your inside ski lifted off the snow. Ski with the inside ski on the snow very lightly. Vertical separation of your feet is good in the turn...it happens when that inside leg is retracted to put more pressure on the outside ski. Too much horizontal separation of the feet make it difficult to get that pressure on the outside ski.

--Why so much inside tip lead? That much tip lead tends to put some people back on their heels, and makes it harder to edge the inside ski. Try pulling back all the time on your inside foot while continually tipping it to more edge and more edge--lift the inside big toe off the snow very early and continually lift the inside foot big toe very much. Drill with your feet as much side-by-side as you can, then relax them and find the position that gives you the best pressure to work the tips of your skis on the snow and gives you inside foot edging ability. It is necessary to begin edging with the inside foot, because weaker muscles tip the foot out vs. tipping it in. If you start with the weaker muscle group (lifting the inside foot big toe off the snow), the stronger muscle group (lifting the outside foot little toe) will have no trouble keeping up. Too much big toe pressure will tend to cause the ski to lose grip.

--Try pushing the inside hip forward (but not the inside foot) as soon as you begin making the new turn. This added counter will help the tail of your outside ski grip the snow better.

--Your bend at the waist doesn't look excessive for the amount of angulation you have, which is necessary to balance with the good angles you're getting to the snow. The alternative would be to incline your body inward in the turn, and that reduces ski edge grip. As you ski more, you'll find the correct balance point that works the best and doesn't feel unnatural.

--Sometimes your outside shoulder is good 'n low, and sometimes it isn't as low as it could be. Vice versa for your inside shoulder...sometimes it could be higher.

--Those are wild arms. Find an arm movement and pole plant philosophy and stick to it. I prefer the elbows closer to the body and the hands out. (For a drill, hold the elbows tight against the body. After the drill, retain that basic position but relax the arms.) Grip the ski pole quite firmly. Plant way down the hill but not too far forward of your feet. With the elbow near your side and the firm grip, reaching downhill with the pole creates a tension in your arm and side that tends to pull that outside shoulder down--good. Tap the pole tip into the snow with that firm grip in a position the correctly positions your body, then let it come out of the snow in a way that does not incorrectly position your body.

--In a suitable spot, at the end of each turn pick out a landmark on the side of the run and switch your skis to their other edges before you allow them to change direction. This will slow your twitchy feet. You'll need to put in a very early angulation to achieve this.

--Do what you need to do for certification, but for your skiing, especially in the gates, learn retraction turns. How would you like to do recreational skiing and gates something like this?
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb View Post
Could you perhaps tell me at what time / times in the video you see proper seperation. perhaps mention if it was the high or low rez version in case the times are different.
In some of your shorter turns I see some hints of your skis continuing to turn as your CoM continues more directly along the line of travel. A couple of examples are around 0:15 to 0:20 (0:45 to 0:55 slo-mo) and 2:20 to 2:24 (2:40 to 2:48 slo-mo). More is still needed, but what I see in the video indicates that you would most likely understand the explanation, and be able to produce the desired mechanics on snow with a bit of guidance.

On the longer turns, you're pretty square to your skis. Not quite rotating (rotating is not good), but close. You're clearly having great fun riding the edge through the turns, but with a few additions & adaptations, you'll go from passenger to driver and have even more fun.

To clarify the terminology: "separation" is separation of upper & lower body, with the goal that the upper & lower body work somewhat independently. There should be evidence of counter-rotation, which is seen as the upper body turned a bit away from the direction of travel of the skis. If the upper body is seen to be turning further into the direction of the turn than the skis, this is rotation, which is not desirable.

This is a kind of simplified description of what is looked for in the skiing from a general visual perspective. What is really important is the skill that is used to achieve this, which, as BigE noted, is pivoting. Pivoting is the action of your legs turning under your body, independent of your upper body.

To give yourself a feel for this movement, try these two things inside:

1) Sitting in a chair, raise your feet off the floor a little, and make "windshield wiper" movements with your feet, around the axis of your lower leg, and keeping your thighs still. You can also do this sitting on a table.
2) Standing on the floor, lean to one side to raise one foot off the floor, and repeat the windshield wiper action, this time by rotating your whole leg in your hip socket.

What you will be doing on snow with your skis is going to be a combination of these movements involving both ankle and hip joints, and also flexing and extending through hips, knees and ankles.

A really good exercise to illustrate and practice pivoting is braquage. I don't think I can succinctly explain this with words, so have a look at:

http://www.vivatexte.com/eprep/cscf/husky/ss_home_alt.htm
- select Technical Levels
- select Level 4
- select Braquage

(Sorry I couldn’t find a way to drop in a direct link.)

Ignore the "fast as possible" part of this, and just focus on the direction of travel, and the movement of the legs relative to the upper body. This is also a good video example to show that the stuff used in an instructional setting also has application in a racing environment.
post #30 of 30
Thread Starter 
Softsnowguy and Mogulmuncher:

Thanks alot for the indepth info, very much appreciated.

Stance so wide. well probably a bad carry over from racing. the coach is always telling me get my feet wider. I actually have a bad habit of keeping them too close. Sunday was sort of a prep day for my first day of racing on monday and I was focusing a bit on keeping them apart. I do agree for recreational skiing that would be too far apart. good point that I need to remember to use it in it's proper application.

Tip Lead : bad long term habit. worked a bit on this last year but hadn't thought about it this year. Chalk another tid bit onto the pile to work on. I like the hip forward analogy, I have used this before, it makes sense to me.

nice video link, man I love watching and doing slalom. Gates? ...... what gates :

Mogulmuncher thanks for pinpointing the times in the vids I saw it and know what you are indicating. Next vid I know I can acheive that. I have worked on that in the past, it's one of those things that when I don't think of it I default to following the ski's. Oddly I don't do it in so much in powder, moreso on my carving skis.

Great vid and drill link, that goes on the favourite list for sure. I think this is along the lines of the same drill as well
http://www.vivatexte.com/eprep/inclu...495&user=husky
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