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Colorado Skiers Can't Ski Powder - Page 3

post #61 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
What, that makes absolutely no sense. I skied in incredible powder last Sunday. If you skied what I did and was still debating that Colorado is still better, you're a complete ski snob that doesn't deserve the time of day. Sheesh.

I try not to get into the Co vs. Ut thing. Good skiing, is good skiing and conditions change all the time. Sometimes Utah is better and sometimes Colorado is better, lots of times in about the same.

I skied waist deep, Friday thru Monday, on steeper terrain than what is currently open at Snowbird/alta. Lot's of the pro's that live in SLC were coming over to Aspen last weekend, because Aspen had the best conditions in the west.

Aspen Mt. is currently 92% open and most of what is not open is still a result of the WC race.
post #62 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
I try not to get into the Co vs. Ut thing. Good skiing, is good skiing and conditions change all the time. Sometimes Utah is better and sometimes Colorado is better, lots of times in about the same.

I skied waist deep, Friday thru Monday, on steeper terrain than what is currently open at Snowbird/alta. Lot's of the pro's that live in SLC were coming over to Aspen last weekend, because Aspen had the best conditions in the west.

Aspen Mt. is currently 92% open and most of what is not open is still a result of the WC race.
except I skied with Sage today, like with him....

Ben Wheeler and his girlfriend were out on the hill as well.

hopefully Ian(PMgear rider) is ok any word on him?
post #63 of 81
I'm glad Si Junior hasn't managed to find most of my lines, but then again what do I know living in Kentucky.
post #64 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si View Post
Just gave my son in Boulder a call to say hello. I asked him how the skiing was the past couple of days. His quote: "Colorado Skiers Suck". He was referring to his observation that Colorado skiers create bumps out of powder in a matter of hours where in Utah and other places you can ski cut up powder for days. He says they just don't know how to ski powder, making short turns and pushing the snow with their skis.

Not having much Colorado skiing experience I can't personally comment but I found his comment somewhat entertaining and thought I'd post it here (with his permission) to see what others think? Seems to me that this just might be one of those gross generalizations worth perpetuating just for fun
[paraphrase] It's not that Colorado skiers can't ski powder, It's that Colorado skiers can't ski, the powder just proves it....[/paraphrase]
post #65 of 81
ski off!
post #66 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post
I'm glad Si Junior hasn't managed to find most of my lines, but then again what do I know living in Kentucky.
UL, you absolutely don't have to worry about my son being stuck in other people's lines. He can pretty easily create his own wherever. Of course if there is any interesting terrain (i.e. cliffs) and a decent base he just goes off and plays on his own. If he is in bumps (even very large ones) he tends to just kind of launch over them. I have actually seen him ski in the bumps (as oposed to over them) but that is a rare occasion indeed.
post #67 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by lnester View Post
Colorado Backcountry = Utah Resorts
Colorado Backcountry right now = extreme avy danger and bottoming out on rocks.

You won't get the volume of snow here that you do in Utah. It's different. Not better or worse, just different. Get used to the difference and enjoy it. Have a negative attitude and don't. Your choice...
post #68 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si View Post
UL, you absolutely don't have to worry about my son being stuck in other people's lines. He can pretty easily create his own wherever. Of course if there is any interesting terrain (i.e. cliffs) and a decent base he just goes off and plays on his own. If he is in bumps (even very large ones) he tends to just kind of launch over them. I have actually seen him ski in the bumps (as oposed to over them) but that is a rare occasion indeed.
Not what he meant, Si. UL's got a few secret stashes. I've seen him find freshies a couple days after a storm...
post #69 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Not what he meant, Si. UL's got a few secret stashes. I've seen him find freshies a couple days after a storm...
Understood Steve. What I was saying is that my son is usually skiing in "secret stashes" because he can and will ski where most others just won't venture. I suspect he knows all of the "secret" stashes where he skis but also has others where the entry fee is beyond all but a few. For further insight let me say that often my own "secret stashes" are just of no interest to him.

BTW, we're back to the difference between Utah (at least Solitude) and Colorado - finding freshies a couple days after a storm is just not even worth mentioning as something special
post #70 of 81
Solitude ain't the Front Range, that's for sure...

...and having skied with your son, I'm certain of what you say...
post #71 of 81
I don't quite see what the problem is. Moguls only form where mere mortals ski, surely not in the rarified air and extreme lines where your son soars.
post #72 of 81
Thread Starter 
Telerod (and others), I apologize for over talking his skiing a bit. I noticed I was doing that and really didn't like the style either. He's a good skier but there are plenty who are better. I just didn't know how to have a realistic discussion about terrain without bringing this up (especially since it was his quote).

You are actually right about moguls not forming much where he likes to ski. Certainly there are some near the exits that faces tend to funnel into but they can be skied over pretty quickly (by those with the skills off course). Unfortunately, early season is not the best time to be launching off anything which is what I think prompted his comment.
post #73 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Colorado Backcountry right now = extreme avy danger and bottoming out on rocks.
Actually, the avy danger throughout most of the state is rated anywhere from low to high depending on where you are. There's nothing "extreme". And I don't think you're going to hit many rocks in the Aspen, CB, Silverton, Monarch and Wolf Creek zones. Those areas saw 70"+ in a matter of 8 days.

Way to over generalize everything though.:
post #74 of 81
Gotta disagree with Bush about this. Sure if everyone who had fat skis made three turns to the bottom, if boarders never sideslipped, and if everybody consciously tried to use up one field before cutting into another, bumps would take days to form. But what really happens is all the intermediates get on fat skis or boards, get freaked by the incline, have marginal control over where they aim, make lotsa little skids and stops, push the snow back and forth like a windshield wiper. I've seen this happen in the back bowls of Vail in a matter of an hour after opening. Not news.

Telerod is closer the the real point: Narrower skis don't push snow around, don't lend themselves to lotsa little turns, which you don't want anyway because of the snow resistance. Modest proposal: If you want the backside to stop looking like the frontside, stop using equipment and/or technique that tears it up so fast. If you use fat stuff, make big turns and/or conserve uncut lines. Or give up and go out of bounds. If you want to get turny, make them on 80 mm skis/slalom boards or go find a glade somewhere...:
post #75 of 81
I've always thought it was just due to the sheer number of skiers in CO. What's a big day at Snowbird? Maybe 6000 people? What's a big day at Brighton? Maybe 4000? (I have no idea, I'm completely guessing at those numbers - does anyone know?) Where as in Colorado you have 14,000 at Copper on big day and even more at Breck. Vail's skier visit record is something like 19,000 skiers.
post #76 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
I think he means "Texas skiers"...

'Specially the ones who recently moved to Denver.

The 20-year social experiment to pave metro-Denver and fill it with tract housing and strip malls must be 50% recent transplants from skiing-free zones like Texas and Southern California. You'd think that would translate to a somewhat lower skill level on the hill.
post #77 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierfanatic View Post
Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't Colorado known for it's powder? Which in turn leads to, shouldn't they know how to ski it???
Having moved from Upstate NY to Colorado, snow is classified differently in the two regions. What we called "powder" at Sugarbush, Waterville Valley and Gore Mtn. Coloradans would call "cut up."



Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Telerod is closer the the real point: Narrower skis don't push snow around, don't lend themselves to lotsa little turns, which you don't want anyway because of the snow resistance. Modest proposal: If you want the backside to stop looking like the frontside, stop using equipment and/or technique that tears it up so fast. If you use fat stuff, make big turns and/or conserve uncut lines. Or give up and go out of bounds. If you want to get turny, make them on 80 mm skis/slalom boards or go find a glade somewhere...:
This seems reasonable.

______________


Also, consider this ... the snow in Utah *tends* to have a lower moisture content than ours in Colorado. Which means our "powder" will pack faster. I have skied plenty of pow in both states; it's just different.

- KK
post #78 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaptain Karl View Post
This seems reasonable.
Sounds like a bunch of hooey to me. The appreciable difference between a 80mm and a 100mm ski isn't going to make any real difference in how snow gets skied out.

A Head chip supershape has a shovel of 121mm, the same as a Sweet Fat Thang, and only 10mm less than the Supermojo 105. That's the difference of 3/8 of an inch. Is that really going to kill powder that much faster?

And any possible advantage of a ski with a tighter turn radius would be more than negated by the increased number of turns.
post #79 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
A Head chip supershape has a shovel of 121mm, the same as a Sweet Fat Thang, and only 10mm less than the Supermojo 105. That's the difference of 3/8 of an inch. Is that really going to kill powder that much faster?
Fat waisted skis allows more people to access powder (fat waisted skis require less skill to ski powder than narrow waisted skis). It also allows people to ski powder faster and with less effort, which means they can ski more powder runs per hour and they can ski powder more hours per day. It's not so much about how much snow gets packed with each pass. I'm not complaining but I believe fat skis and snowboards are largely responsible for the powder getting tracked out faster now than in the past.
post #80 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si View Post
Telerod (and others), I apologize for over talking his skiing a bit.
Apology accepted, although there is nothing wrong with a father taking pride in his son's abilities. The acorn doesn't fall far from the tree.
post #81 of 81
Thread Starter 
Thanks Telerod, but in keeping with my previous tone the acorn sails out a lot farther than the umbrella of the tree :
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