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Bumps on a board - why?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
As a part time boarder (about 25% of my time on the slopes), perhaps its just that I don't have enough skilz on the board, but I don't see any point in riding bump runs. It just seems tiring and clumsy. I'm no expert on skis in the bumps either, but I do have fun on "intermediate" bump runs on skis -- but just hate em on the board.

Could just be my riding style -- I like to ride fast, hard, sweeping turns -- the kind where you've got your gloves on the snow.
post #2 of 13
It's both too slow to get your adrenaline going and not enough skills to make it interesting. I never liked bumps when I started skiing either; I didn't like anything that slowed me down. After being stuck in the land of small hills where it isn't easy to reach exciting speeds combined with the fact that like an addictive drug you need more of it for it to be satisfying I expanded my horizons by working my way into them.

The main thing for me was that going slow just wasn't as fun for me, but once that becomes a minor point, the skills definitely play a role. It takes more skills to have fun in bumps.

Once you get over the hump, it's all good.

PS. I still suck in bumps, but I suck at a high enough level to have fun.
post #3 of 13
It might seem like a lame response, but how about "because they're there"?

I don't like feeling constrained by the existence of bump runs. I don't like the idea that there might be trails or whole parts of a mountain I would avoid just because they're bumped up. So I'm learning to ride the bumps. I find it very challenging and I still suck pretty bad at it.
post #4 of 13
I love to ride bumps if the bumps love me. If the bumps are mean and nasty, they hurt my feelings. I'm sensitive like that.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
As a part time boarder (about 25% of my time on the slopes), perhaps its just that I don't have enough skilz on the board, but I don't see any point in riding bump runs. It just seems tiring and clumsy. I'm no expert on skis in the bumps either, but I do have fun on "intermediate" bump runs on skis -- but just hate em on the board.

Could just be my riding style -- I like to ride fast, hard, sweeping turns -- the kind where you've got your gloves on the snow.
I suck on skis in bumps. I love slush and crud bumps on my board. It took lessons before I learned to like them. You need to have independent leg motion, good flexion/extension, nice centered stance to own them. I still don't like hard icy bumps.

If you are ever in Snowmass, ask if you can get Marco Olm as a snowboard bumps instructor. He does some really good progressions and will be taking you down bumps you would never have believed you could do before. You will have the skills before he takes you there.
post #6 of 13
To ride the bumps with the style you are accostomed to is clumsy. It sounds like rather than exploring the bumps, you should be exploring an alpine board and start ripping some serious trenches.

That said, You should be changing your technique in the bumps, and not trying to ride them the same way you would ski them. you should play with the bumps. some may require you to pivot on the top of them, while thers can be ridden like a banked turn. you can pop off of them. the key is to keep the board in contact with the snow. you will need a lot if independent leg motion (as opposed to the locked knees of the pro bump skier). it takes work to stay forward on the board and keep the nose on the sno, but it is essential. if you allow that nose to start coming up, you have less board to work with, thus less control.

I'd love to get into them with you and give you some pointers if you ever come out vermont or massachusetts...or we can work on that alpine thing...

-Noah
post #7 of 13
I have a friend who's a beast in moguls on a board. They're more technical with skis as well as a board but once you know how to rip 'em fast they're great. It's really helped me as far as turning goes on the rest of the mountain to, specifically tree skiing.
post #8 of 13
Bumps are worth riding because they are great fun, will improve your riding all over the mountain, and allow you to explore more of the mountain.
post #9 of 13
Gang,

it's this simple, avoiding what challenges you on the mountain is rarely ever going to challenge your personal skill sets.

Agreed, some bump lines that I have dropped into were pretty gnarly, BUT non the less it still was worth the effort. My other thought, taking a somewhat passive approach I.E. - making a series of slow traverses across the mogul field. This will intruduce both the body, legs, and equpiment to the various terrain changes happening. Speed control comes much easier for this task. As rider becomes more comfortable with both the movement concepts (what body is doing) and board performance concepts (what the board is doing.) Then the path of travel should the be tightend up or take a slightly incresed line down the hill. In addition a quick note, I always split the run into very small digestable sections. The main though here is speed control, board control and rider confidence arrive much quicker in theory.As with the mastery of the skill sets necessary to navigate a bump run... so in turn the line / path of travel down the fall line will increase.

Yes I will also chime in and say at some point you may feel like things are coming un-hinged while doing this...BUT isn't that why we started this doing this sport to beging with. Let things get a little hairy, the slowly reel it back in. I'm not saying straight line and take out everyone on the slopes. Use common sense and your discretion here, pick days / conditions to task this excercise when the hill traffic and incident potential is less likely.

Enjoy.

Jonah D.
post #10 of 13
Bumps (like really chopped up steep slopes in spring snow) are fun to carve down, as long as you don't catch a hole with the nose of your board and break it, therefore I'ld only do this with super stiff boards.

For bigger moguls, taking a longboard like a tanker 200cm or a long swallowtail is fun too. Just straightlining it and taking the **** out of it. Ain't possible on small boards though for me. Simply not stable enough. The longer the better. I've 2 times participated in the Weisse Rausch - an offpiste race at the Arlberg with 500 participants and both times got great results being one of the fastest boarders and having only few skiers that could keep up, once deep powder and my long board just ment me going faster than people on kiddie boards and skiers on average freeride skis, second time as I was one of the very few to straightline the 500m vert mogul field at the beginning without crashing, actually there was a definite lead of snowboarders vs skiers after the first section but we got taken over on the uphill sections which both times had me overtaken by quite a lot of skiers and boarders.

However I don't like going down moguls or bumpy sections if I'm neither able to straightline nor to carve it. Generally the longer your board the easier it becomes. For me anything between 1,80 and 2,10m makes chopped up or moguls a pleasure.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremecarver View Post
I don't like going down moguls or bumpy sections if I'm neither able to straightline nor to carve it.
Try to learn to ride the bumps. It's fun, even on the long race board, you can rock and roll. Don't limit yourself.
post #12 of 13

Now here's a silly concept

The big difference between skiing groomed slopes and skiing moguls is the role of extension and absorption for speed control. The feet/legs act like pistons working simultaneously. Riding bumps versus groomed trails works the same way except that the feet/legs work sequentially.

Bumps are just another part of the mountain like trees, gates and park/pipe are other parts of the mountain. An expert rider rides all
mountain under all conditions. We ride bumps on a board because we can.
post #13 of 13
Cause we can ride bumps like skiers too, with very short turns and rather slow speed extending and absorbing everything, but i agree to the top post, that it's no fun to do. Especially with a Raceboard or a 2m longboard, doing very short skidded turns takes a lot of power. If it's really steep there rarely are any moguls at all, so enjoyable jumpturns are out of question either cause there are no such steep mogul fields.
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