New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Travel gear

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Hey everybody. I either drive or rent demos or something along those lines when I travel.

But, I want to start bringing my own gear and I need a case or bag for my skis and a pack or packs for my gear.

Skis: I run a pair of 162's and never bring more than one pair, so would I do best to buy a single bag made for 162's or......
Do ya'll prefer hard cases or soft and what's the good/bad of either

Boots and gear: I carry a fair amount of gear, if I'm paying for a trip I'm skiing and I don't give a damn if it's -50 degrees. So I bring gear for a multitude of conditions. My question is should I use 1 pack or 2, they've got those nice little packs that will fit boots, helmets, gloves etc. but won't carry bulk gear and then they have those large duffels that can carry everything but the kitchen sink. They both have good and bad points such as decreasing the number of bags versus smaller and lighter. I'm also curious how many of ya'll insist on separating your boots from your gear, I think it sounds like a good idea but I'd like some opinions.

So how about it you sky warriors, help me look good

Thanks
post #2 of 26
MeCasa, I did swear by the big Transpack bag... until I got my Hot Gear heated bag. I can't say enough about it! There is nothing quite as wonderful as slipping into a pair of warm boots! So, I'd say a Hot Gear bag for boots, helmet, gloves and a few other small things, then a bigger bag for everything else.

I use a Dakine Fall Line double roller ski bag (I carry at least two pair when I travel). Dakine has other bags, though, and if you click the Backcountry link at the bottom, you're likely to find some decent deals on them.
post #3 of 26
Just got this today in black. It's beautiful. Found it on eBay for $125.00

http://oakley.ca/pd/5052
post #4 of 26
That looks pretty sweet, Kid!
post #5 of 26
If you're sking a 162 you might want to consider one of the larger snowboard bags. It could handle 2 pairs if needed or you could stuff bunches of extra gear in it if you fly.
post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 
I REALLY like that Hot Pack, every once in awhile I spend too much time in the lodge and forget to put my gear in front of the fire, waking up in the morning with a cloudy head and saying "Where's my boots" and then after a minutes thought "Oh sh*t"

But I'm not sure I want to spend that much right now as I bought new Hot Rods this year. But I'm thinking that I'll go with a small boot pack and a mid size duffel. Those Transpack XT's have a pretty good price, anybody have one?
post #7 of 26
I have a Transpack XT in addition to the Hot Gear bag. It's a great bag! Very comfortable as a backpack, you can fit a lot into it, and it's easy to stuff into a locker...
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
XT it probably is, although I'm still looking at the Heat. I could cut back on my vices to save the money, but I already used that lie when I bought the Hot Rods
post #9 of 26
What kind of boots do you have? Depending on your boots, the heated bag may make a big difference. There are a few alternatives to it, too.
post #10 of 26
Here's an example of the kind of thing you can use as an option (Boot Burners).
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
I use Nautica Beast 10. If you add in the price of the Boot burners you're up to the cost of the better pack. I don't mind the XT pack Next year i'll get the better pack and keep the XT as backup gear.

I love first class gear as we all do :

If I'm careful I can get the XT for $45 and the matching single ski bag for $45, both in red and then find a decent matching duffel for another $40 or so. All three for the price of the Heated pack, but I will eventually grab a heated pack, I drive an Audi wagon and it has 12 volt plugs in the back, it would be so cool to plug my boots in.
post #12 of 26
At least the Beasts are middle ground and a bit more manageable. Just keep 'em as warm as you can...
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
I have a Transpack XT in addition to the Hot Gear bag. It's a great bag! Very comfortable as a backpack, you can fit a lot into it, and it's easy to stuff into a locker...
Also, if you pack soft gear (base layers, gloves, etc) in the middle compartment of the XT it will compress enough to fit in the overhead bin of "most" planes. I did run into trouble with this on a smaller jet we took to SLC a couple of years ago, but it still fit by taking one boot out.

Glenn
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
Also, if you pack soft gear (base layers, gloves, etc) in the middle compartment of the XT it will compress enough to fit in the overhead bin of "most" planes. I did run into trouble with this on a smaller jet we took to SLC a couple of years ago, but it still fit by taking one boot out.

Glenn
The transpacks are really nice bags, but the shape isn't good for airline travel,

Square backpack style bootbags with the soft goods on the outside, fit better into the overhead bins!
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
Also, if you pack soft gear (base layers, gloves, etc) in the middle compartment of the XT it will compress enough to fit in the overhead bin of "most" planes. I did run into trouble with this on a smaller jet we took to SLC a couple of years ago, but it still fit by taking one boot out.

Glenn
On the smaller plane, gatecheck it. It will show up on the jetway when you arrive.

(Says the guy who spends a reasonably high percentage of his flights on CRJs from DEN to the midwest.)
post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 
I agree, I will add my boots to the plane's belly. I'm a rock climber (medium quality) and my most important gear is my clothes. In many cases I CAN'T replace some of this gear with matching quality, color and fit, but I can replace my boots and skis although I obviously wouldn't like it. So my mountain clothes(super compressible) ride in the plane with me.

One thing I am considering is adapting my ski and boot packs into one unit. I'm thinking this can be accomplished by adding some 'quick locked' strapping to tightly hold the boot pack to the ski pack, then I'll make a lightweight form fitting nylon cover to the outside of the combined packs so they'll be one unit.

I don't believe this will be as hard as it sounds, I rework my gear for various uses such as expedition motorcycle trips all the time and I've even made my own custom packs . My concern is that the combined packs will be an odd shape that will catch everything, but I really do believe the good outweighs the bad. I would add cinch straps to the exterior and I should be able to make a clean shipping unit.

Whatcha think?
post #17 of 26
If you have a pair of boots that are confortable and fit well you really should consider carrying them with you. I have over $500 of bootfitting and two years of time invested in my boots. Any clothing that I have can be replaced much more easily.

"We don't grow too old to play, we grow old because we stop playing."

Herman "Jackrabbit Johanson :
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Everybody's different. To me, my boots are large plastic shoes uncomfortable by nature but necessary in order to ski. Don't get me wrong, I wear good boots and I'm happy with the comfort but I can grab another pair on ebay anytime I want.

But my gear keeps me alive and it cost 10 times what my boots cost. But that's not the real reason I love my gear. I love my gear because we survived 'together', and you have to take care of your friends. Besides, the poop chutes all line up.

But this forum has given me some jam up ideas. One of the gentlemen up above suggested stuffing some extra gear with my ski bag, I love the idea. If i strap the boots dead center on the ski bag that will keep it balanced. it would create a "T" shape which could easily become a full triangle. You would have two large storage areas on each side of the boot pack. These areas would be controlled by cinch straps on the cover, so you would either cinch to the gear or to the skis adding more capability when desired. You're allowed 50 pounds, plenty for a small trip, but never enough when you need heavy gear such as tents, stoves etc. I would think light fluffy gear would be perfect.

I'm going to buy the XT and the matching ski bag, I'm kinda excited, I even like the way they look. And even if I do eventually get the Heat, the XT will give me light weight capabilities if that's needed.

Very Good !!! And God Bless Marmot ;-)
post #19 of 26
I, too, always carry my boots with me, largely because I, too, have hours of boot fitting to get me balanced in them. If/when you get this done, you'll likely consider your boots more highly (), but until then...

BTW, a number of airlines will allow you to check a ski bag and boot bag for free outside your normal baggage allowance. I'm not sure I'd combine them for the reason you note: they are likely to catch on things and be a problem for the baggage people...
post #20 of 26
My previous pair of boots took a fair bit of customization but I always checked it in when travelling. It survived all these years of flying without mis-shape, until I retired them. I never thought about carrying them with me for safe-keeping purposes. I guess ignorance is a bliss.

My new pair of boots cost 3 times as much but surprisingly, fit off-the-shelf. Well, sort of. There're some pads added and the cants were adjusted but nothing punched or pushed. So if need be, I can replace it relatively easily. More importantly, the newer liners are much easier to break in (actually, little break in needed). So the "pain" of breaking in another pair of the same boot won't be such a big deal as in the past.

The real nightmare, is to lose it at the begining of the trip and had to suffer with rental. The concept of "large plastic shoes uncomfortable by nature" is for people who hasn't bothered with having their boots fitted professionally. Once spoiled, I had trouble "thinking" about rental boots.

Still, the weight and bulk of the boots are such I really don't feel like carrying them with me, important as they may be... Fortunately, all my flights are non-stop so chance of lost luggage is significantly less.
post #21 of 26
I always max out my carry-ons. Many trips, I just have carry on. If I'm skiing, I carry on the boots. I did this even on my trip to France last spring.
post #22 of 26
Transpack .... my kid has been on a hundred planes with this as his carry on.

Key is stuffing it ... like .. shell and extra gloves on the bottom, helmet upside down and stuff the helmet with goggles & gloves.... stuff the boots with socks etc ... snacks ... for delayed flights ..
post #23 of 26
I'm not familar w/ the Transpac, but one thing I always get is a boot bag with backpack style shoulder straps(some are consealable in a back pocket). You never know how far you'll have to walk or how many other things you'll be carrying:
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
Also, if you pack soft gear (base layers, gloves, etc) in the middle compartment of the XT it will compress enough to fit in the overhead bin of "most" planes. I did run into trouble with this on a smaller jet we took to SLC a couple of years ago, but it still fit by taking one boot out.

Glenn
Another approach - use a big stuff sack for all the junk in the middle compartment of the XT -- once you're on the plane just pull the whole stuff sack out and you've got two items that easily fit in overhead: the XT collapsed with nothing in the middle, and the stuff sack.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeCasa View Post
Hey everybody. I either drive or rent demos or something along those lines when I travel.

But, I want to start bringing my own gear and I need a case or bag for my skis and a pack or packs for my gear.

Skis: I run a pair of 162's and never bring more than one pair, so would I do best to buy a single bag made for 162's or......
Do ya'll prefer hard cases or soft and what's the good/bad of either

Boots and gear: I carry a fair amount of gear, if I'm paying for a trip I'm skiing and I don't give a damn if it's -50 degrees. So I bring gear for a multitude of conditions. My question is should I use 1 pack or 2, they've got those nice little packs that will fit boots, helmets, gloves etc. but won't carry bulk gear and then they have those large duffels that can carry everything but the kitchen sink. They both have good and bad points such as decreasing the number of bags versus smaller and lighter. I'm also curious how many of ya'll insist on separating your boots from your gear, I think it sounds like a good idea but I'd like some opinions.

So how about it you sky warriors, help me look good

Thanks
Boots, gloves, hat, etc., I've always carried-on. I now use a Transpak but used to just go with a backpack with the boots strapped together. Skis are in a soft bag with socks and such packed around them. Then all the rest of the stuff, the layers, the pack boots, general winter clothing all goes into a huge rolling duffel.

I'm not too worried about losing my boots for good, but they fit great and I don't want to rent. One time I went to Montana and my skis went to Vail. They showed up 3 days later and AA paid for demo rentals.
post #26 of 26
I do 7-10 airline ski trips a year, including starting tomorrow to Whistler, and I virtually always take my skis and boots along.

Pack your boots along with (at least) one days ski clothes in your carry-on bag (with a toiletry bag). If you put nylon or Techwik type clothes, you can wash them out nightly until your stuff shows up if it gets lost.

Try to avoid putting expensive clothes like nice jackets in your bag, as some TSA representatives have found a part time job in marketing expensive clothes on ebay, and virtually always you'll see a TSA tag in a ski bag so be sure someone will be in there.

Make sure you use a permanent marker and write your address all over the bag, so some nit-wit at the airline can't say there was no tag on it and get it back to you quickly if lostg.

Get a double ski bag, and put your skis along with the rest of your ski clothes in there. Do not get too long a bag (and ALWAYS get a wheeled bag) - get one close to the length of your skis so that you can drag it around without a lot of overhang. K2 has some bags that are perfect for 160-170 length skis.

Keep your bag below 50 lbs, unless you're a "premier" member of the airline or they'll get you for overweight baggage.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion