New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

early season skiing

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
hey guys,
what are the best places to ski early season(say around christmas) in north america? thanks for the help.
conor
post #2 of 21
Christmas isn't early season. Everything in Colorado will be open by then barring an outrageous weather condition.

Last year Loveland opened on 10-15

Most everything will have some coverage in Summit County (A-Basin, Keystone, Breck, Copper) by mid November. By the first of December resorts are almost always operating with 80%-90% of their terrain open.
post #3 of 21
Mt Baker is usually a good bet for early snow..... Mt Hood opens in September so it will be going for sure as well... Whistler/Blackcomb should also be good up top...
post #4 of 21
I think conb11 was asking where is the best place to ski around Christmas, not who will be open early.

Usually CO is good around Christmas b/c everything is usually open and adequately covered. Utah and Wyoming have such big rocks and usually get amazing midwinter snow that not much is covered by Christmas. Tahoe is usually going off in December as that is when a majority of the storms are coming through. Tahoe usually goes dry during Jan and Feb then storms return in March and April. The PNW would have a lot open in late December, but you always have the chance of rain, YUCK! As for the East Coast, I have no suggestions. I'd say avoid it b/c of crowds anyway. New Yorkers are a**holes!!
post #5 of 21
Look out, another retard figured out how to surf the web! :
post #6 of 21
conb,
Welcome to the forum.
I'd suggest avoiding places like Whistler/Blackcomb and Breckenridge over the Christmas holidays, as it can get busy around then, particularly with British ski families. For a North American resort, it is big, but Christmas is a busy time.
If you are travelling from Europe, I'd suggest contacting some of smaller tour operators and taking advice from them.
Conditions aren't going to be something to worry about. While in Europe, Christmas may be considered "early season", North American resorts would call late November/early December as "early season"

Hope this helps,

S
post #7 of 21
Hey Bum4Life?

I have a very good suggestion for you to do right now but fortunately for the nice people of this Forum, I will spare them the obsenities.

There are a**holes everywhere, not just in N.Y. and you probably know them. Most New Yorkers that I know are the kindest and most thoughtful people in the world who would give anyone the shirt off their back.

Enough said, get my point?
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by Lars:
Hey Bum4Life?

I have a very good suggestion for you to do right now but fortunately for the nice people of this Forum, I will spare them the obsenities.

There are a**holes everywhere, not just in N.Y. and you probably know them. Most New Yorkers that I know are the kindest and most thoughtful people in the world who would give anyone the shirt off their back.

Enough said, get my point?
ever heard of sarcasm?
post #9 of 21
Generalities about weather, are as suspect as about people. Sometimes the snow goes south to New Mexico and sometimes north to Montana. I'm more comfortable painting with a broad brush about the weather. I have also stated previously 80% of the time there will be 80% of terrain open by 12-15 in Colorado.

Six inches of snow is predicted above 10,000 for the central mountains Saturday!
post #10 of 21
Quote:
ever heard of sarcasm?
People who try to use sarcasm on the internet show their lack of understanding of the internet's reach and etiquette. Sarcasm is not universal throughout the world and relies heavily on body language and/or past knowledge of the persons involved. Its always misunderstood by a large percentage of readers. :
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by Pierre:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />ever heard of sarcasm?
People who try to use sarcasm on the internet show their lack of understanding of the internet's reach and etiquette. Sarcasm is not universal throughout the world and relies heavily on body language and/or past knowledge of the persons involved. Its always misunderstood by a large percentage of readers. : </font>[/quote]I agree with you Pierre and will take it a step further. Sarcasm has it's place and is often funny and I certainly saw the sarcasm in the original post. That said, any time ill words are cast regarding a certain group of people, be it race, religion, gender, culture, or locality, in my opinion you're out of bounds and should expect the resultant slaps that occur.

I haven't been in this forum for that long, but I'm often amazed what people will say when hiding behind a computer screen. I take the approach that I never post a statement that I wouldn't make if in person. Kind of reminds me of my late grandfather's favorite saying, " Don't let your mouth write checks that your ass can't cash."
post #12 of 21
So that means I can yell at people who call me a M*******?

[img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #13 of 21
jeez, whole can of worms opened. I love New York!! It's a great place, but part of what gives it it's charm is the fact that people are kind of a**holes. That's what gives the city it's character, I love it. They would give you their shirt off their back, but not without making some a**hole remark first. This is the same thing as when New Yorkers call the midwest soft, or the west coast wacky. My comment was never meant to offend, rather to make someone laugh. I laugh when someone says that midwesterners are all inbred... because we are. Ha!!! As for sarcasm on the internet... yeah that's not possible : !
post #14 of 21
Everyone hates people from other states.

Mainers hate Mass People.

NH people hate Mass people.

NY people hate Mass people.

Wait, I see a trend.

[img]smile.gif[/img]

Seriously though, everyone is entitled to their opinion.

I personally didn't like Stratton because I didn't like the people there which were probably mostly New Yorkers but I may like Whiteface. The $70 lift ticket, crappy expensive food, and crowds didn't help. I think I may try it again for their $130 2 nights 3 days midweek skiing though.

I'm sure some people don't like me driving up from Boston to go to NH, VT, and ME.

I like people who ski because they love it.
post #15 of 21
As for Conb11's question.

I live in the NE so Killington and Sunday River are your best bets in the NE area as far as % of open terrain goes. I haven't been to Jay Peak or other northern VT areas that early though.

I skied at Killington Nov 1st last year, skied at Sunday River for Thanksgiving and they had like 70% open, and then skied at Sugarloaf for Christmas but their conditions were not spectacular.

The almanac is calling for alot of snow this winter so we'll see.
post #16 of 21
Here's a great article about early season conditions and which resorts historically are the best bets for the best conditions. Of course, there's no guarantee that there will be snow wherever, whenever you go.
post #17 of 21
1. (2) Grand Targhee, Wyo.
Targhee remains the only area in North America with a 100% Christmas reliability record over the past 25 years. 1997-98 was particularly impressive, when Grand Targhee had a 50-60 inch base in mid-December while its Northern Rockies neighbors were in terrible shape. In the last two seasons Targhee’s early December base was a bit thin, but fresh snow arrived in time for the holidays.



2. (1) Mt. Baker, Wash.
The Pacific Northwest’s early season of 1997-98 was not dry as in the Northern Rockies, but there was a lot of low-elevation rain. Mt. Baker had its share, but still attained a 6-foot snow base before Christmas. The last two seasons brought huge dumps in December and a 10+ foot base by Christmas. Mt. Baker remains North America’s best bet for pre-Christmas deep powder.



3. (12) Whistler/Blackcomb, B. C.
We underestimated Whistler’s early season reliability in 1997 by focusing upon the rain-vulnerable lower mountain. A poor start to Whistler (as in 1997-98) just means that the lower 1,000-2,000 feet aren’t covered and you must download at the end of the day. The Whistler and Blackcomb alpine regions got about 100 inches of snow in November/December 1997 (average is more like 150), and 5,000+ acres of terrain were open at Christmas. There have been only two early seasons in the past 20 years (77 inches in 1989-90 and 91 inches in 1992-93) with less snow. Whistler’s early December World Cup downhills were cancelled 3 years in a row due to too much snow. Whistler/Blackcomb is the best big mountain choice in North America before Christmas, but beware of exorbitant prices during the peak holiday season.



4. (3) Mt. Bachelor, Ore.
Mt. Bachelor received only 50 inches of snow in November/December 1997 and was about 70% open for the holidays. The next year there was a 100+ inch base by the end of November, and Christmas 1999 was also excellent. Bachelor’s snow accumulation is more gradual than Whistler’s, but it is a better holiday choice due to lack of crowds and reasonable cost.



5-7. (4-6) Alta, Utah
Brighton, Utah
Powder Mt., Utah
The last 3 early seasons were all below average in Utah, with 1997-98 being the best. The fall of 1998 saw major dumps, but snowfall was the less than half normal from mid-November to mid-January. In 1999 October and November were very dry and Alta did not open until the second week of December. In all 3 seasons Alta had 75-90% of terrain open for Christmas. Utah is somewhat speculative for holiday skiing. The Park City region is often not completely open, and when visiting skiers flock to Alta for its better snow, the crowds can be overwhelming. Before Christmas, Alta, Brighton and Powder Mt. can rival Mt. Baker as a powder destination, with better snow quality.
post #18 of 21
Not sayinhg that it will happen again, but 1994 was the hottest summer ever recorded in SLC. This summer will go down in the books as the second hottest (barely). What was the winter like following the hottest summer? The SL valley saw three feet of snow on the ground during November. Alta had over a 100" base by mid December. Snowfall for the entire year was about 140% of normal (thats around 700 inches at Alta).
post #19 of 21
My predictions are similar....hot-dry summer means hard winter. Our summer here in WA has been very warm and dry unlike last year when our summer was mild, rain and such and a horrible winter then followed.. Hope my theory holds true!
post #20 of 21
U.S. National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said that a ‘La Nina event’ is either developing or in effect. That's usually pretty good news for the PNW and Northern Rockies. [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #21 of 21
The last time we had a La Nina in the PNW, Baker received 1140" of snow, and the rest of Washington was similarly puked upon.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion