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Do I really need carbon poles? - Page 2

post #31 of 59
I like the Leki Trigger system. I have two sets of straps and can put them on any glove I choose.
post #32 of 59

You don't need carbon poles...

...you need poles that won't break or bend easily, have a good swing weight, have decent grips and straps...and, most important, are the right length. Most people I see are cruising around with poles that are too long or too short. The Scott alu slalom poles everybody is talking about are definitely the safest bet out there. I have a pair of Scott alu GS poles that are just fine. However...I also have a pair of Swix carbon SL poles and another pair of Swix GS/SG poles, and both are really, really nice. I personally do not like Goode carbon poles...but that's just one data point. That was a while back and they were definitely whippy and I didn't like the swing weight/balance...
post #33 of 59
id say it depends what your goals are and how you ski. if you want a pole you can take to hell and back and it not break definitely get the the Scott World Cups. I ski with them and i have abused them so bad its amazing they have never broken.
post #34 of 59
any chance that someone has a single goode 10.4mm pole? 120cm/48" or longer?

After 10+ years I fell on one and broke it.

pm me please
post #35 of 59
Funny, the only poles I ever snapped were Scott Racers. So, YMMV...
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
any chance that someone has a single goode 10.4mm pole? 120cm/48" or longer?

After 10+ years I fell on one and broke it.

pm me please
Let me check up in VT on my way to ESA, I might. A couple of years ago, I posted a thread about one of my poles being stolen, I just forget which size it was.

If I do, it is yours for the price of shipping and handling ( might need to find a box). Shoot me a PM Thursday.
post #37 of 59
Another vote for Scott WC SL poles. I have two pair, one with large baskets for powder, and, of course, crud.

www.sierratradingpost.com has them for $40 if you can't find them locally: item 83398.
post #38 of 59
The WC pole is a great pole, ski with one of them and one carbon/graphite pole in hard/icy conditions and then decide for yourself. You will feel much less fatigue with the skinny pole.
post #39 of 59
Everyone knows carbon poles help you float better in powder
post #40 of 59
Well I misread the initial post. I thought you said you didn't like aluminum poles.

I break a lot of poles, so I like to bring two pairs with me. My back ups are nice carbon Lifelinks, but I use aluminum because I don't want to break my nice poles. Maybe if i used the carbon ones, I'd have less breakage?

I have a fear of the carbon shattering after being heavily flexed. I picture sharp splinters being propelled with a great deal of force through my heart. The difference in swing weight or air drag is not a big deal for me.
post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
The WC pole is a great pole, ski with one of them and one carbon/graphite pole in hard/icy conditions and then decide for yourself. You will feel much less fatigue with the skinny pole.
I don't know what this "fatigue from poles" thing is. I think I felt weird once when I skied some old steel poles with leather baskets.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Funny, the only poles I ever snapped were Scott Racers. So, YMMV..
When I last used fancy schmancy poles I was doing a bunch of silly things I don't do now, so it is possible I wouldn't have a problem now.

SRSLY though, carbon hoohoodilly poles with interlocking gloves? Can you get any more PSIA geek than that?

The nice thing about my fluorescent puke yellow poles with/without puke yellow Leki half guards is that I never have to look very hard to find myself in the video...none stolen so far either.

One year I was skiing with the Scott rental pole with WC grips swapped on. That is the best aluminum pole setup on the market AFAIK. Best shaft money can buy, no silly paint to chip, bigger basket...swap in a good grip.
post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
SRSLY though, carbon hoohoodilly poles with interlocking gloves? Can you get any more PSIA geek than that?
Nope.



Let's go skiing.
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Let's go skiing.
If you see a dorky kid with glasses and puke yellow poles in your neck of the woods, holler.
post #44 of 59
Hahaa... remembering my only pair of carbon poles. Second day of use on Mt. Bachelor in very cold conditions (for there) in 18 inches of Pacific NW "powder". I took a fall right before a long flat -- SNAP went the pencil thin pole. It was a long haul through that flat with one pole.... I now am enamored of any pole made of a material that will bend back rather than break and that I discovered on the clearance rack....
post #45 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
If you see a dorky kid with glasses and puke yellow poles in your neck of the woods, holler.


My last non-carbons I still have: Reflex Fluted with hot pink grips and baskets.
post #46 of 59
No you do not.
post #47 of 59
Yes, particularly with pimp chrome handles like the K2 Six Speed. So hawt.
post #48 of 59
The question should be why do you want carbon poles? Is it just because the price tag is more expensive? You can then prove to your buddies that your are a "pro"?

Find out what the benefits are of carbon poles. The disadvantages? Advandages to your current style of pole, versus carbon.

If you are using your poles in a blocking style, are carbon really the best for you or do you need something more ridgid? If you want light weight, non-resistance, then why are you using poles?
post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Why did you go back?
I didn't like the flexy feel of the composite shaft on a hard pole plant.
post #50 of 59
Sweetest poles I ever had were Scott's with Hexcel graphics and the molded strapless grips. I think I lost them in a move some time ago, or I'd still be using them. I HATE straps.
post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yaughtben View Post
The question should be why do you want carbon poles? Is it just because the price tag is more expensive? You can then prove to your buddies that your are a "pro"?

Find out what the benefits are of carbon poles. The disadvantages? Advandages to your current style of pole, versus carbon.

If you are using your poles in a blocking style, are carbon really the best for you or do you need something more ridgid? If you want light weight, non-resistance, then why are you using poles?
I tried carbon composite poles in the late-90s just to see what they are all about. I switched back to aluminum because I didn't like the flexy feel of them. I am sure today's technology is better.

Back when I worked in the outdoor retailer biz, a manufacture's rep said there were 3 reasons any item was more expensive than the other. Those reasons are that the items are lighter, faster, and stronger.

Here is how we can break down the carbon composite poles (at least the good poles):
  • Lighter - Generally carbon composite poles are lighter. That means it's less mass that you have to hold onto. Less mass also means less fatigue on the skier.
  • Faster - Most carbon composite poles have narrower shafts or are aerodynamically shaped which means less wind resistance.
  • Stronger - Most carbon composites flex pretty far and snap back to being straight before it breaks. Aluminum poles will stay bend.
You mentioned a blocking style. I am assuming that you are referring to racing. Most racers I know are using Scott WC aluminum poles (including myself). Aluminum poles seem to take direct slalom pole impacts very well. I know that there are composite race poles on the market, but I haven't tried them, nor have I gotten any feedback on them.

Dennis
post #52 of 59
I don't like straps either, but no Texas Grips for me.

edit: Dennis, stiffer than Alu composite poles have been around for some time, they just cost a ton of money. "Light" is less important in a pole than it's MMOI, which creates the "swing weight" feel. There is no doubt that composite poles are superior to aluminum in this regard. As far as strength, you really mean durability, and I doubt they are actually more durable than aluminum, but I don't really have recent experience to know. I'm not about to spend 200 bucks on a pair of poles to find out. "Blocking" refers to a style of pole plant that no one should be making often enough for it to matter unless they are trying to look old and irrelevant. Blocking gates will eventually break aluminum poles. I've got a nice big dent in my SL poles right now, I'm sure they'll be in two pieces by the end of the year.
post #53 of 59
Thanks, Garrett.

Dennis
post #54 of 59
Poles that bow when you do a blocking pole plant could serve as a good reminder to STOP DOING THAT!
post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Well I misread the initial post. I thought you said you didn't like aluminum poles.

I break a lot of poles, so I like to bring two pairs with me. My back ups are nice carbon Lifelinks, but I use aluminum because I don't want to break my nice poles. Maybe if i used the carbon ones, I'd have less breakage?

I have a fear of the carbon shattering after being heavily flexed. I picture sharp splinters being propelled with a great deal of force through my heart. The difference in swing weight or air drag is not a big deal for me.
I actually know of a guy who died because he got skewered with a broken pole. I'm pretty sure it was an aluminum pole.:
post #56 of 59
I'm pretty hard on my gear. I've been using the same pair of Lifelink Varient probes for at least 10 and probably 13 years. I think carbon is plenty durable.
post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
I actually know of a guy who died because he got skewered with a broken pole. I'm pretty sure it was an aluminum pole.:
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
I'm pretty hard on my gear. I've been using the same pair of Lifelink Varient probes for at least 10 and probably 13 years. I think carbon is plenty durable.
Thanks for addressing my concerns. I'll probably start using my Lifelinks more often based on what I've read in this thread.
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Poles that bow when you do a blocking pole plant could serve as a good reminder to STOP DOING THAT!


I was thinking that too.
post #59 of 59
I've got a pair of Leki "Titanium" poles and a set of Atomic aluminum racing poles.
I love the Leki's, they are much lighter and I find it easier to keep them of the snow. I don't know if there's actually Titanium in them or not but the weight difference isn't minimal and they are plenty strong.
I absolutely adore the trigger system too, only downside is you can't hang your poles on your skitips when going for a drink. For everyday skiing I always use the Leki's.

When running gates however, I prefer the bulkier, heavier alu poles. They inspire more confidence when hitting the gates and bend less.

So carbon, I don't know, but I definately prefer my poles a lot lighter than aluminum ones.
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