or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Base Grind for New Race Skis?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Reading over ssh's/HeluvaSkier's tuning FAQ, I noticed that it recommends that new race skis should be ground before anything else. I'm just getting into racing, so I don't know about this kinda stuff. Before I put the base bevel on, I ran a Sharpie along the edges. It came off clean and even (by my eye, anyway).

Does grinding just assure a flat base, or is there more to it than that?

Thanks!
post #2 of 9
There is a lot of info here on grinding, etc.

A new stone grind will slow the ski - send it through many waxings before it hits the snow (covered in the link).

Also, different patterns are preferred in different regions, consult with someone who knows what grind works (from experience) where you are.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the link Dr. D. I'll be sure to go over that info!
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Dr. D (or others),

Here's what I gathered from your primer on stone grinding: That base structure is helpful in tracking water out from under your skis so that suction effects are mitigated (kinda like a rain tire channeling water away from the wheel on a car?).

I'll be using my new race skis in Summit County, where the snow is typically dry and soft (until April anyway). Because there is less moisture in the snow here, won't an unstructured ski be acceptible? If not, should I pick up a rilling bar and get someone to teach me how to use it? How much of a difference would putting a structure on my base make in typical early-middle season Colorado snow?

Thanks again!

PS The snow is really coming down today and should be until Monday! You Right-Coasters gotta get out here!!!
post #5 of 9
Your skis have structure from the manufacturer (shallow cross pattern I believe). The reason most say to base grind skis that do not come prepped from the race room is you can set your own structure and bevels and get wax into the base. After a base grind I usually wax my skis 10+ times before they ever hit snow. I also wax them and let them sit in the sun from time to time as well (cheap alternative to a hot box).

Anyhow, for your purposes you are probably safe with the standard Nordica structure (thats what you're on right?). I have had my factory structure on my Nordica racers for several seasons now and they work fine. I have a few skis that I run deeper structure on for the spring, but it probably doesn't make a whole lot of differences for my purposes. I have way too much to work on with my skiing than to be worrying about seasonal base structure to make myself faster. Meaning - you can put me on a perfectly prepped ski and I still won't be fast enough to be winning FIS races.

I will say that the Nordica structure is usually good. It isn't as good as Fischer, Salomon, and Rossi from the race room but it is significantly better than Elan (which I used to ski on). As long as you keep them waxed up I think you will be just fine with how the ski is set up.

Later

GREG
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Fantastic! Yeah, at my level of skiing (pretty good, but World Cup? . . . not a friggin chance my man!) I'm sure I'd be hard-pressed to notice any minor differences. I was just worried that structuring skis would have a huge affect. Doesn't seem like it, so I think I'm good to go (waxed 'um about 15 times and set-up a good edge).

Have a great season!!!
post #7 of 9
What I tell people is to wet your finger and try to run it down smooth glass. Then do the same thing to textured shower glass or similar. You can easily feel the suction on smooth glass versus textured glass, ie 'structured' glass.

It is true that you benefit more when moisture and humidity are present and freeing the structure is extra important. I've found (whether psychologically or not) that even in cold and dry conditions the glide is better and beieve everyone would benefit to some degree.

As a performance minded, DIYer, I've messed around with various low tech, quick and easy, methods of structuring bases by hand and found that I can achieve excellent glide with rilling bars, sanding, wire brushing and other methods to impart grooves in the bases of my skis to achieve the basic goal of minimizing suction. With minimal imperfections in the base (and most will never feel) compared to a perfectly flat, machined base I doubt that if there is any REAL performance difference relative to glide performance.

YMMV and others believe a machined grind is the only way to go.....but the only way to find out what works for you is to try various options over time. There are many methods to achieve the basic structuring goals and for most of us, split hairs will not make a substantial performance difference. I find it interesting that people will ski Mach I on very abrasive snows and treat their bases like they are made of glass when they do base work.

In any event you need to free the structure after waxing to benefit from the structuring.

There are several discussions in this forum and here is an image of using a rilling bar:

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlbuquerqueDan View Post
Dr. D (or others),

Here's what I gathered from your primer on stone grinding: That base structure is helpful in tracking water out from under your skis so that suction effects are mitigated (kinda like a rain tire channeling water away from the wheel on a car?).

I'll be using my new race skis in Summit County, where the snow is typically dry and soft (until April anyway). Because there is less moisture in the snow here, won't an unstructured ski be acceptible?
In dry snow the opposite is what you desire. You want to hold what little water that is made by friction under your skis to improve the glide. It is not totally retained but the structure should be patterned such that the goal is not to move the water out efficiently, but to allow it to reside under your base slightly longer.
post #9 of 9
One problem as HelluvaSkier alluded to is it's not practical to frequently change your base structure relative to the changing temperatures and conditions. Around here, we can easily experience a 30°F temperature swing in a day which probably equates to easily 5-10° (+/-)?? snow temp swing, and more some days. Throw in different temps depending on time of day and sunshine locations and it is a mixed bag.

I do not recall any extended cold or other consistent temperature patterns in CO where you could bank on them year in and year out, much less their length. So are you better off erring towards a colder structure than warmer like with wax during a given 'normal' temperature period? I'd say you might be better off erring towards warmer and possibly playing around with reducing the brushing on harder, cold waxes on a given cold day.

Could this be a regional issue somewhat? It seems like all over the country, highly variable temperatures are occurring.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs