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Are bindings essential?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I was just wondering if bindings were essential to skiing. Do they really make a difference while you ski or no? Just a random thought, and would like some information. Thanks.
post #2 of 25
I'm not exactly clear on what you are asking.

If you are asking do you need bindings on your skis to ski, then YES. They are essential, you can't just stand on a ski and slide down the hill as if you were surfing.

If you are asking do 'high performance' bindings improve a ski's performance, then the answer is It Depends. For most recreational skiers it won't be noticable, for some racers/ agressive freeskiers they are critical.
post #3 of 25
I don't think they are
post #4 of 25
Definitely not. Go to a Chili's or Applebee's near a resort, make a offer on a pair of beartraps on the wall, strap 'em on, and rip.
post #5 of 25
Duct Tape. The answer to all skier's questions.
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Duct Tape.
Over the mouth. The answer to all trolls.
post #7 of 25
Besides WHiteroom comment, the OP didn't get a straight answer. :
I'm kinda curious too.
post #8 of 25
The ski binding has two simple functions:

1) To attach you to the ski in a manner (with minimal slop) to allow you to control the ski.
2) To separate (release) you from the ski before the twisting forces of the ski cause you physical injury (below the failure threshold of bones and ligaments).

The binding setting determines the release point for the toe and heel piece. This setting is determined by a number of factors (weight, ability, boot size, etc.) Clearly, heavier skiers require higher settings as they generate greater momentum, otherwise the bindings would release prematurely (below desired retention point) at lower forces. Ability is a factor because better skiers tend to ski faster, again generating higher forces in their feet. Boot size determines the moment arm and thus can make your setting higher or lower for the same weight/skill skier. The binding also provides a anti-shock/return to center function. This allows the binding to absorb the repetitive shocks that occur rapidly during skiing. Without this functionality, the cumulative shocks would cause the binding to release prematurely (below desired retention point).

Iin theory, if you are the perfect skier who never makes a mistake while skiing, you could in fact epoxy your boots to your skis and effectively ski. But if you ever make a mistake, you are toast. The rest of us mere mortals require the release binding to save our asses if and when we screw up on the hill.

That said, the bindings represent the last line of defense against injury when you screw up while skiing. I recommend you buy a decent set of bindings and have them mounted and adjusted by a certified/experienced ski mechanic. This is relatively cheap money, considering what lift tickets cost today.


The Organic Ski Mechanic (retired)
post #9 of 25
Majesus, straight questions deserve straight answers, funny questions deserve funny answers. But this wasn't even an intelligible question. More along the lines of "Does it make a difference if mountains go up?"

Now if the OP were asking a clearer question, along the lines of "Why don't we stand on skis and surf," or "Why are bindings separate, more or less, from skis," or "why are boots not bonded to the bindings," then it'd get a clearer answer.

Welcome fudman 22!!
post #10 of 25
I think fudman 22 (welcome aboard!) and Whiteroom provided the answer to the OPs question even though the question could have been more clearly worded.

langs15,
Let me know when you're going to be at MC.
post #11 of 25
beyond, I jumped the gun with my reply earlier thinking the same. In retrospect, I think the question was sincere based on previous posts by this member. My apologies for mis-reading the intent.

langs15, if you could be a bit more specific with your question, it would help get a straight answer. fudman22...well done.
post #12 of 25
[FONT='Verdana','sans-serif']
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Majesus, straight questions deserve straight answers, funny questions deserve funny answers. But this wasn't even an intelligible question. More along the lines of "Does it make a difference if mountains go up?" [/font]
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

[FONT='Verdana','sans-serif']Now if the OP were asking a clearer question, along the lines of "Why don't we stand on skis and surf," or "Why are bindings separate, more or less, from skis," or "why are boots not bonded to the bindings," then it'd get a clearer answer. [/font]

[FONT='Verdana','sans-serif']Welcome fudman 22!!
[/font]

[FONT='Verdana','sans-serif']Beyond, I'm not critizing you personally in anyway, it is just that not everyone here knows a lot about ski equipment. I read the op's question a few times and I see how it can be interprested as: “do we really need bindings to ski or not?” but the more legit and likely question asked was “do different bindings make a difference while skiing. Say does a $450 binding make a difference over a $150 binding? “ I always was wondering that question myself.[/font]
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
I meant do high performance bindings make a huge difference to say average bindings. I was amused by some of the comments though. ha

Oh and BillA, will do. I wont be there much though, I have crazy schedules during winter.
post #14 of 25
The difference in the cost of a binding is analogous to the difference in the cost of cars. You get what you pay for.
Do you really need a $75,000 car that can go 0-60 in sub-5 seconds and cruise at 130 mph? Realistically no although having one would be awfully nice! But human emotions dictate what we want, logic dictates what we need. An inexpensive binding may have a limited DIN adjustment range or feature reduced anti-shock capabilities. A more expensive binding may include a "flex adjuster" to accomodate different snow conditions (this feature is really more hype than functional).
Do we all need to ski on the ski or binding that Bode does? Not really. Once you get past the hype and emotion, for 98% of recreational skiers, you are good with a middle of the road binding that is properly mounted and adjusted.

Now skis are a whole 'nother issue where logic does not apply...

YOUNGER WOMEN, OLDER WHISKEY, LONGER SKIS!
post #15 of 25
^^ The only time I might disagree with you is that in the higher end binders they generally have higher din's and more metal. If you are one of those rockstars or perhaps a bit large the extra metal may be worth it.
post #16 of 25
OK, with the links and clarification by OP, sorry if I misinterpreted. Far as restated question, agree with fudman mostly (No point in getting a high DIN unless you need it and they do tend to weigh more) but let's face it, within an appropriate DIN range, most bindings are roughly the same cost (cheap compared to boots and skis). A few brands offer slightly different designs that may be more or less friendly to the way you ski. (Compare Looks and Markers for elasticity, for instance)

That said, and knowing these forums are all about Which Ski Will Make Me Great, if I had to choose, I'd put my effort in researching bindings rather than skis. (And boots over all) But this is from a guy who long ago and far away messed up his knees permanently by cartwheeling on trashed rental bindings that never let go.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by langs15 View Post
I meant do high performance bindings make a huge difference to say average bindings. I was amused by some of the comments though. ha

Oh and BillA, will do. I wont be there much though, I have crazy schedules during winter.
I'm at Vernon every weekend. Look me up when you're there.
post #18 of 25
Super glue for intermediates and epoxy for advanced skiers. Bindings only add necessary weight and wind resistance.
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fischermh View Post
Super glue for intermediates and epoxy for advanced skiers. Bindings only add necessary weight and wind resistance.

yeah, jokes over..but good one!
post #20 of 25
I think most of the bindings available today are sufficient for the average skier. I doubt that most would be able to tell the difference between different brands and or models without looking.
post #21 of 25
If you look real hard at many of the high end skiers ... we just nail ourselves in.

Get yourself down to "Ace Is The Place" or "Home Despot" and just get a good Stanley hammer and a sack of "five penny" nails.

A few pointers ... many beginners make this mistake ....

#1. Nails are driven through the boot down into the core of the ski; nails driven from the bases up will result in drag and funny handling skis.

#2 "Toe nailing" ... we do that by driving a few nails at angles through the heels .... nails driven through the toes, well they just go straight down

: don't listen to these gapers with their duct tape and epoxy stuff!
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
If you look real hard at many of the high end skiers ... we just nail ourselves in.


#1. Nails are driven through the boot down into the core of the ski; nails driven from the bases up will result in drag and funny handling skis.

: don't listen to these gapers with their duct tape and epoxy stuff!
Yuki,

Please make it clear that the nails are driven through the sole of the boot into the core. I took your instructions and drove them though the entire boot (top and sole) with my foot inside. This was most painful:. You didn't specify so I used a ten penny nail with a 16 ounce hammer. Actually, it was not "them" as I stopped at one nail. I'm kinda smart that way.

Ken
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
If you look real hard at many of the high end skiers ... we just nail ourselves in.

Get yourself down to "Ace Is The Place" or "Home Despot" and just get a good Stanley hammer and a sack of "five penny" nails.

A few pointers ... many beginners make this mistake ....

#1. Nails are driven through the boot down into the core of the ski; nails driven from the bases up will result in drag and funny handling skis.

#2 "Toe nailing" ... we do that by driving a few nails at angles through the heels .... nails driven through the toes, well they just go straight down

: don't listen to these gapers with their duct tape and epoxy stuff!
You're wrong Yuki!!!
I use duct tape. I find that its easier to change from ski to ski with the quick slice with a carpet knife.
I've also found a variety of colours so I can match the specific ski I am using.
post #24 of 25
#1 ... ... sorry, I should have mentioned that you should at least try to drive the nails between the toes ... oooooops .. !!

#2 .... : Trek found checkered flag duck/duct tape .... a sure fire stocking stuffer for any NASTAR racers, if anything is gonna take you from bronze to silver ... das' the ticket .. !!

:
post #25 of 25
Nails will work... but I find if you pre-drill the holes..fill with gator glue then use screws it' s more secure. Gator glue also can be used to stop the bleeding if you choose the through your foot method .
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