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The ski vs. the skier

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have got some great info off this site already. Does anyone think that skiing tecnique may be more important than the ski? I started in 1995 at the age of 22 on Rossignol Cut 10.4 skis size 184cm. I just recently (today) bought new skis. They are not an upgrade over previous skis but are new and I guess I got ripped off. Anyway, can someone who knows how to ski any terrain make the skis work for them in any terrain? I am 5'9, 205lbs, muscular, workout, etc... I ski glades, steeps at Jay Peak, Whiteface, Gore, etc... all eastern resorts. Is the ski really that big of a deal? Thanks in advance for you nice or not so nice input, Matt.
post #2 of 15
Glen Plake skis moguls faster than most ski groomers, on straight cut vintage style 220cm downhill race skis.....so the answer is yes.

But I really think its all about what you are accustomed to.
post #3 of 15
I'm a believer that "it's the Indian, not the arrow" -- i.e., if you know what you're doing, then yes, you can get just about any ski through just about any snow condition imaginable.

That said, don't drive nails with a screwdriver... i.e., no need to make it harder then it is.
post #4 of 15
Matt,
If you ever get the chance, ski at a demo day where several ski brand reps have many models of their skis for everyone to try. You'll answer the question for yourself. Yes, very good skiers can do well on anything. But, the right ski for the skier is a huge benefit. Even if we are equally good skiers, equal condition, and test equal quality, similar skis, you'll likely prefer one brand and I'll another...just individual differences in the skiers and the skis.

For anyone on a budget, used skis are the right way to go, and even then negotiate hard on the price. Try to make a list of skis that suits your ability and skiing style, and find some good used ones of the right size for you. Most used skis aren't damaged or otherwise unskiable. The owners likely just replaced them with something newer and trendier, or maybe the owner improved themselves up to the next level...or bought the wrong skis for themselves in the first place. There are reasons why some used skis are not worth buying due to their condition...that's a topic for another posting.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattyfro73 View Post
Anyway, can someone who knows how to ski any terrain make the skis work for them in any terrain?
Depends on the ski. There are some wacky skis out there that just suck out of their element, but for the most part yeah you can make most skis work most anywhere. What did you buy?
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the "yes" vote. I bought a cheap pair of Fischer XTR Fire 170's (122/73/99) which turned out to be manufactured for "rental" duty. I didn't do my homework plus I am a single-father = broke. The ski shop didn't have much for $200 dollars so I took the ski with the widest waist. Plus the turnaround time for my bindings to get mounted onto the ski is Dec 27th. WTF?? If I bought online then I would still have to find a shop to mount my bindings to the new skis. Anyway, thanks for listening to me whine. I will ski on these this season and save my pennies, next season I will be armed with better skis.
post #7 of 15
While generally I'd agree that there are pretty marginal performance returns for most skiers versus investing some time in training, there are cases where it can make a big difference.

One is moving to modern equipment from straight skis. If you've got shaped skis, even if they're a few years old, it's going to be a huge difference from your old skis.
I strongly suggest taking a lesson even just for a morning. Tell the ski school you've just moved to shaped skis and even just in a couple hours you'll likely find a huge difference.
post #8 of 15
When observing most skiers in the battle of the ski vs the skier I most commonly see the ski as ending up victorious.




Translation: Most skiers are fighting their equipment because it is skiing them, not the other way around.

Oh, and yeah, good skiers can ski on pretty much anything in any conditions and still make it look good. Optimal tools just make them look even better.
post #9 of 15
From my memory, the Cut series of skis were Rossi beginner and low intermediate skis.

That said, a ski like that will tend not to be friendly on ice and steeps and just won't hold up on anything except blue groomers especially as the speeds and your ability increase.
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Yeah, they were bad on ice especially. Hopefully the fischer are a little better.
post #11 of 15
It's the Indian not the arrow. You can get a lot out of large range of skis, but different skis need to be skied differently to extract their full potential, and you can only push a ski so far past its limits. What year was your Fischer "XTR Fire"; I'm familiar with RX, but not XTR.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattyfro73 View Post
I will ski on these this season and save my pennies, next season I will be armed with better skis.
There is nothing wrong with that ski. It will take you wherever you need to go. Have a great time on it this year. SRSLY, I wouldn't mind skiing on that.
post #13 of 15
Softsnowguy nailed it!
If you ever get the chance, ski at a demo day where several ski brand reps have many models of their skis for everyone to try. You'll answer the question for yourself. Yes, very good skiers can do well on anything. But, the right ski for the skier is a huge benefit. Even if we are equally good skiers, equal condition, and test equal quality, similar skis, you'll likely prefer one brand and I'll another...just individual differences in the skiers and the skis.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
It is a 2008 ski. I called Fischer Skis in the U.S. and they explained it was manufactured to be a "rental" ski. It is extremely durable with a deeper base and harder edges for frequent sharpening/stonegrinding, etc... In a previous post someone told me for the 200 I spent, I could have done better. Problem was I didn't have to time to shop around since I didn't have the money, I originally was going to stonegrind and sharpen my Rossi Cut 10.4, circa 1995 models but for what it was going to cost me, I spent another hondo and got new skis. I am a single-parent, blah, blah, blah, no money for toys. So they should be fine for as little as I ski, less and less each year.
post #15 of 15
There is nothing wrong with spending 200 bucks for that. If you are going to buy a 200 dollar ski, buying a "rental" model is a good choice. Enjoy.
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