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Boots before skis?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Since I have been looking for a semi inexpensive boot, I am told that I should spend more of my money on the boots rather than the skis. Why is that? And if you are one who thinks boots are more important, can you direct me to some boots that will be great, but not break me financially. To tell the truth I was excited to be getting a new pair of skis this season, but it seems there may be a change in plans..
post #2 of 27
So you would actually consider buying skis and renting boots?

Boots have a liner made from foam, the liner packs to the shape of the foot of the person who wears them, therefore a boot that has been on a few feet will fit no one.

A good pair of boots will keep you skiing and smiling all day, a poor pair will get you off the slopes fast, in pain.

Once you have skied with a pair of boots that fits you will understand.

I will take almost any skis, but the boots have to be mine.

In terms of a good pair, only you can know with the aid of a good bootfitter.

Really the question is fit. Don't even think about skis untill you have your boots.
post #3 of 27
"Generally" speaking you'll go through several+ pairs of skies while using the same boots if you get good fitting boots. IMHO the first place to put $$ is good boots and warm clothes. How much do you have to spend?:
post #4 of 27
Skiing in sloppy rental boots is like driving while only being allowed to turn the steering wheel with rubber bands.

Find a good boot fitter. Maybe someone can recommend one in your area. Get some boots that fit well, and be prepared to have a little work and a few return visits to tweak the fit just right. Pay whatever it costs; it will be worth it.
post #5 of 27
You will never be sorry that you spent money on good boots. Your feet will be more comfortable, warmer, and you will be able to control your skis better. You don't have to go to the top of the line (and price) boots to get a pair that willl work for you. The others are giving your good advice.

I can tell you from experience, even if you are on the best skis in the world, if your feet hurt you are not having a good time, no matter what else is going on.
post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 
At the moment I have around $550. I already have a good pair of bindings, and good ski apparel.(Not the most fashionable, but it keeps me warm.)I am looking to buy boots, skis, and eventually a new helmet.( I already have a helmet but I don't like it..) For skis I am looking at the Line Anthems and I do not remember the name of my bindings..I am thinking I will get a cheaper pair this season and get good boots. Skis can come in the spring. I have been told to get demo skis, but I don't trust them, because when people use demos they beat on them.
post #7 of 27
As Ghost said, you can buy great tires, but if you suspension sucks the tires are a waste of money.

Your boots are the suspension and steering they are the most important part between the driver and the ski.

Find a good boot fitter, you should be able to find last years boots at a discount.

Why do you live and ski ? may be we can recommend someone. There is also a boot fitters guide here somewhere.
post #8 of 27
Look at it this way: You will NEVER read this much agreement here about skis. There are some really good skiers on this thread - and everywhere else the topic has been brought up - telling you that it all starts with boots. Listen. Learn.
post #9 of 27
I have many skis, but I only have 2 pair of boots.

If it came down to one or the other I would give away all my ski's to keep my boots.

Definately put your money into the boots. Good boots don't have to break you finacially , there are so many good deals if you look for them.

My advice don't buy a really stiff boot (unless you know you can handle it), and don't buy some entry level wet noodle boot either.

Make sure the boot fits properly (DO NOT BUY TOO BIG !). Shell fit, shell fit, shell fit. do some reading here, become educated and go find a good bargain on boots.
post #10 of 27
+1 for boots. It's where you get all your control. Don't take advice on boot models, go to a good fitter and have him suggest a shell that supports your foot.
post #11 of 27
I'm just going to recomend what has worked great for me. I don't sell any of this stuff, don't even work in the industry. As I have said before, after 30 years of skiing, If I had to buy new boots now; I'd go to ebay, buy the well priced boot in my performance range(preferablly a Flexon) and then get Intuition liners(about $200 fitted) IMHO you would have as good a boot as the $600+ stuff for less than $300-350. You need to get an idea of the best shell for your foot.
post #12 of 27
Not to disagree with you Altaman. If you know what your doing may be that would work. But for most of us we're better off leaving boot fitting to the experts.

I have a Engineer friend that you sound like, he even skis without poles, in rear entry boots. When one of us gives him our poles to ski with, he automaticaly stands up and has great body position, carves turns and appears to ski much better. But he still gives the poles back and has a good time, doing what he's doing. We try every year to get him to move into the new gear, he reads all the news on new skis, sits there with us in the evenings and talks with us as we disscuss what next ski or boot we like, money is not a problem for him, he's just happy the way things are.

Sorry to ramble on.

What I'm saying is different strokes for different folks. Nothing wrong with idea.
post #13 of 27
Max is right, it does take a little knowing what you need so it will depend on how comfortable you feel about doing it yourself.

If it were me, I'd start w/ something like these:

http://cgi.ebay.com/RAICHLE-flexon-c...QQcmdZViewItem

Throw out the stock liners, get thermofit liners. For $266 you have custom fit pair of boots, and $$ to spend on custom footbeds.
post #14 of 27
You can ski on any ski, you cannot ski in just any boot.

Buy a decent pair of boots that match your level and foot; could be left overs from a previous year, spend the $50-$200 to get them custom fit and youll be golden.
post #15 of 27
It all starts with the boots. Wrong boots, painful boots... doesn't matter what ski you have on... if you don't have good boots your day will suck.

I would go to a reputable shop with a knowledgeable staff and buy a good boot in the proper shell size and stiffness. Then rip out the liners and shell out $120 - $170 for some custom Intuition liners and be done with it. If you didn't screw up and buy the wrong shell size or stiffness, those boots will outlast many pairs of skis.

Seriously man, spend the dough and get it done right. I'm also not joking about the Intuitions - best money I ever spent.
post #16 of 27
Boots...Boots...Boots...Period.

the energy you want to put to the ski, goes through the boot. If the energy is lost in the boot, no ski will perform like it should.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Boots...Boots...Boots...Period.

the energy you want to put to the ski, goes through the boot. If the energy is lost in the boot, no ski will perform like it should.
Absolutely agree, also-how can you ski if your feet are numb,cold,aching---oh wait--that's how they are supposed to fit. JUST KIDDING--You really need to find a good boot fitter and invest there first.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Que View Post
It all starts with the boots. Wrong boots, painful boots... doesn't matter what ski you have on... if you don't have good boots your day will suck.

I would go to a reputable shop with a knowledgeable staff and buy a good boot in the proper shell size and stiffness. Then rip out the liners and shell out $120 - $170 for some custom Intuition liners and be done with it. If you didn't screw up and buy the wrong shell size or stiffness, those boots will outlast many pairs of skis.

Seriously man, spend the dough and get it done right. I'm also not joking about the Intuitions - best money I ever spent.
Interesting, never heard of intuition liners before.

To the OP: If you want to be REALLY cheap go to REI and try stuff on, and if you happen to find one that fits then you can order that online. If you are willing to be a bit of a bastard you can always go to a good boot fitter and find a boot you like, then order it online. If you're going to do this go to REI first so you don't take up the time of an expert boot fitter when you're not planning to actually buy under any circumstances. You might even consider giving the person who helps you try on boots a small tip ($5 or so) for their trouble.

I wouldn't do this, I just bought at the shop from the person who was helping me. He was great. It was in Minneapolis, MN

http://www.pierceskateandski.com/aboutus.html

Great store. My budget isn't that limited though as yours. I paid about a $100 premium, well worth it though since they did all the adjustments and custom fitting I needed for free. Still could have saved going online of course, but its good to support local shops who put the effort of stocking such a wide range and actually know how to fit properly
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierfanatic View Post
Since I have been looking for a semi inexpensive boot, I am told that I should spend more of my money on the boots rather than the skis. Why is that? And if you are one who thinks boots are more important, can you direct me to some boots that will be great, but not break me financially. To tell the truth I was excited to be getting a new pair of skis this season, but it seems there may be a change in plans..
Yep. Absolutely. No doubt. Boots!

The difference is night and day. There are many skis that would be fun for you, and none of them will hurt your feet. If your boots don't fit both your feet and your body, you are at least having to compensate and at most, miserable and possible in danger.

Get good boots for you, your feet, your body, and your skills. Worry about skis later. In fact, demo skis until you find the ones you like, and buy them (used!).
post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well since i haven't got an answer on the thread I made in the boot forum, what is you opinion on the 2007 Dalbello Aerro 80 Ski Boots? I found a pair for $150. That seems extremely cheap from what I have seen so far, and to top it off they are in a local ski shop!
post #21 of 27
Ask any good skier...if they had the choice between just-right boots and garage sale skis, or vice versa, the choice would probably be 100% for just-right boots.

When I fly to ski, I always hand carry my boots on the plane. I can make do with anything else I need at the mountain by renting, buying cheap, or borrowing stuff, but not boots. About used demo skis--I bought a pair of Head XRC800 demo skis for the Mrs. from a shop in NY state, and the skis looked like new. Great skis, great condition, great price. Mid & high performance demo skis often are not beat. Also, the used skis offered here by Epic folks are likely very skiable and fair priced.

Make a posting in the Boot Guys forum about what questions you need to answer to choose boots. With the right info from you, they'll make excellent recommendations. The suggestion above about the old Flexon boots is not for everybody. Some folks loved them, and some, well, didn't.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierfanatic View Post
Well since i haven't got an answer on the thread I made in the boot forum
Well, yes you did! It is in the first thread you started, where they told you it is not possible to size you for a boot over the internet, and that a free boot is not worth the price if it does not fit.
post #23 of 27
With all the recommendation on going to a pro fitter for boots with custom lining. How much did it end up costing?
post #24 of 27
Lots of good advice and no rankor. Many of the upper level boots have thermo liners similiar to the intuition. They are heated and formed to your foot in the store. Get the right shell and a good custom footbed and you should be there with minimal adjustment. Last years boots should be available for $250-$350. Every shop I ever bought new boots from offered a deal on footbeds with the boot, expect to pay $90-$150 for this. So I think your budget is reasonable. Don't try and buy the boot with the biggest discount. Get the one with the best fit and flex for you. If your lucky it will be the cheap one. Ski ownership is overrated. If you don't ski maybe 20 days a year, you won't get the use out of the ski before its obsolete. On a per diem basis it's probably cheaper to rent or demo high performance skis. These skis should always be in tune and appropriate for the day. More than I can say for my personal stuff. Plus you don't have to travel with them. Hope this was helpful
post #25 of 27
Let me add some rankor then. Screw the skis! Get the boots! You can pick up an excellent pair of leftover high end boots for $250-350, boots that were $600-800 retail (as an example, my brother in law bought some last year's Salomon Xwave 9 boots from SierraJim's website for $260, which is a super deal -- I wish they had my size because I would buy a spare pair for myself). If you can find the right pair for your feet and needs, it will be the best money you ever spent. And (switching in to Cliff Clavin mode) it's a little known fact that you can actually ski with your boots directly on the snow if you know what you're doing. Really. I saw some dude ski a whole run in his boots in a Warren Miller movie, so it must be true. You don't even need skis!
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierfanatic View Post
Well since i haven't got an answer on the thread I made in the boot forum, what is you opinion on the 2007 Dalbello Aerro 80 Ski Boots? I found a pair for $150. That seems extremely cheap from what I have seen so far, and to top it off they are in a local ski shop!
These are terrible boots for you.

...then again, maybe they are perfect.

How close is your foot and lower leg to the last of the boot? Are you expert enough to know?

How close to optimal for you is the ramp angle of the boot?

Does the forward lean combined with the ramp angle (zeppa) put you in balance at neutral? How will you know?

These things are essential! Read the FAQ in the gear forum. Read the foundation post in the Ask the Boot Guys forum. Read the Ask the Boot Guys FAQ.

Then, do whatever you want.

But, your best approach is to break the bank on the boots and fitting, and deal with whatever skis you can get... And teton is right: unless you're skiing a lot, it's probably not worth it to buy skis. I went for years without them just using demos.
post #27 of 27
All about the boots. However, no one here can recommend a boot for you. The most experienced bootfitter with all the knowledge in the world still needs to see your foot to tell you what will be best for you. If you are worried about cost I would suggest going to a recommended shop and seeing what manufacture boot fits your foot best, then pick an intermediate / relatively inexpensive boot from that company. Fit will differ greatly by company, try a bunch and see what works then have them professionally fit and add a footbed. Customs make all the difference!
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