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Helmet Camera Recommendation

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hello all,

Unfortunately, along with a bunch of other non business related sites, Epic was restricted where I work so I have not been able to post or lurk for a while. At least the ski season is here to ease my withdrawal.

My 9yr old son has asked for a helmet camera for Christmas. Can anyone recommend a brand or model that is sturdy and on the inexpensive side? I'm not even sure what these things cost.

He skis about 50 days a year, is on the mogul comp squad at our mountain and spends most of his lunch breaks in the parks. In other words he will get good use out of the camera until he destroys it.

Thanks for the input and have a great season.
post #2 of 14
There are ones that cost hundreds of dollars. The cheapest one that has fairly good quality is this one... http://www2.oregonscientific.com/sho...cid=14&pid=709. I use it on my dirt bike and its fine.
post #3 of 14
Most helmet cams require carrying a recorder, which means your expensive camcorder. Integrated cameras and storage solutions are heavy and have limited capacity. For all the demand out there, there are just very few practical and durable offerings. I have the one from Sportshotz, and rarely use it because of the hassle of wires, setup, and the clunky arrangement to turn on and record with the camcorder. It takes decent pictures.

You can buy "lipstick" sized cameras which are ideal for this use, and attach them to mini recording devices. That costs more but is light and compact.

Everyone points to the Oregon Scientific camera as an all-in-one inexpensive solution. You get what you pay for. That camera takes low resolution 640 x 480 pictures and is so heavy it can't be stabilized on a helmet. As a result the pictures shake and become pretty useless. Remember, you are paying for lines of NTSC resolution. You want at least 480 lines and 580 is much better.

I'm sure there must be an elegant solution out there, but at this point, I sure don't see any worthy of being given to a kid. I think in a few years, we will see a lightweight, affordable all-digital solution like this $800 POV.1 camera

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Eh View Post
There are ones that cost hundreds of dollars. The cheapest one that has fairly good quality is this one... http://www2.oregonscientific.com/sho...cid=14&pid=709. I use it on my dirt bike and its fine.
I have 1 and at about 25/30 degrees it freezes up "owners manual states it will not work below freezing" ..If you have the money purchase the one that feeds to a storage device that is kept warm by body heat.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidbump View Post
I have 1 and at about 25/30 degrees it freezes up "owners manual states it will not work below freezing" ..If you have the money purchase the one that feeds to a storage device that is kept warm by body heat.
Thanks. Good to know. I have one mounted on my dirt bike helmet and when I'm riding that it's usually pretty hot out. Someone mentioned they vibrate a lot but I screwed mine right into my visor with a small piece of rubber under it. Seems to take the vibration away.
post #7 of 14
You can check out http://helmetcameracentral.com/ for reviews and more information as well.
post #8 of 14

bump

A friend of mine got the $89 one for riding on his motorcycle. It only requires an SD memory card. Anyone have experience with this in the snow?
post #9 of 14
This info is from the maggots

380 Land, Sea & Air Xtreme Kit: $199.95
480 Land, Sea & Air Xtreme Kit: $299.95
560 Land, Sea & Air Xtreme Kit: $339.95 --> http://www.helmetcamera.com/acart/ag...metCamera_Kits

Aiptek A-HD 720p HD Camcorder: $130.00 --> http://dealnews.com/Aiptek-A-HD-720-...dealnews_today
post #10 of 14
Looks like an older post, but here's my 2 cents.

I've had the Oregon Scientific for the past few years for both bike and skiing and am disapointed with it again and again. It's not very wide angle, it vibrates, doesn't take good sound, and worst of all the picture quality is poor. Because of all these reasons, I rarely use it. I brought it out for some early season runs this year and again was not happy with what I shot.
post #11 of 14

I bought a Vholdr a while ago and haven't been disappointed.  They are light weight and are around $279.

post #12 of 14

I've been using the Oregon Scientific ATC5K all season and have been pretty happy with it.

 

It has a wider field of view than the 2K or 3K, is a bit lighter and having experimented with different mounting points, I have found that mounting it FIRMLY to the side of my helmet with the small rubber pad that comes with it, takes out virtually all of the wobble. It also has better resolution than the previous models.

 

I was fairly diligent and was able to buy mine on ebay for $65.00, new and in the box. I also stocked up on SD cards so I can shoot as much as I like throughout the day. My key to keeping it working in cold temps is to take it off my helmet for the lift ride up and putting it in a pocket with a ZIPPO handwarmer (I also keep spare batteries there too as this cam eats up a lot of power). The helmet mounting pad is easy to use with one hand and I can take the cam off and stuff it in a pocket entering the lift-line.

 

The only drawback as compared to the higher priced POV.1 is that video can't be immediately reviewed (which makes having spare SD cards cool; shoot different runs/friends/views on different cards for later review). I take the cam down to the truck and check it out on my laptop at lunch or just wait until I get home to reivew the footage. No big deal, really; especially for less than a hundred bucks.

 

Oh yeah, one other thing. The lens gets packed pretty easily when I get face shots in deep snow, but I can't imagine any cam, at any price, performing too much better in those conditions.

post #13 of 14

I think the main advantage of the POV, which you indirectly alluded to, is battery life.  I can go a full ski day on rechargeable AAs and still have 50-60% charge at the end of the day.  And this is with the unit "ON" the whole day (I use the wireless remote to stop/start recording or tag clips).  Battery life is what made me punt on most of the other helmet cams, as they are all horrible in cold weather.  Two things in the POV's favor are the separate recording unit, which you can wear inside your coat, and the use of four AAs, which is probably an oversized reserve to allow the unit to function in cold when weather battery output drops off.

 

I did the math with some of the other cams, and the cost of lithium batteries would have eaten up the price jump to the POV pretty quickly.  Realizing that, I felt that it made more sense to put the money towards the more expensive POV.  Would be nice if the POV was a couple hundred buck cheaper, but it is pro grade equipment.

post #14 of 14

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabinfever View Post

 

Hello all,

Unfortunately, along with a bunch of other non business related sites, Epic was restricted where I work so I have not been able to post or lurk for a while. At least the ski season is here to ease my withdrawal.

My 9yr old son has asked for a helmet camera for Christmas. Can anyone recommend a brand or model that is sturdy and on the inexpensive side? I'm not even sure what these things cost.

He skis about 50 days a year, is on the mogul comp squad at our mountain and spends most of his lunch breaks in the parks. In other words he will get good use out of the camera until he destroys it.

Thanks for the input and have a great season.

 

I don't think the POV1 is a good cam for a 9yr old kid. Like i said, I have the Vholdr that has worked great, very sturdy, and i've lent to my 12 year old nephew without a worry. best of all is it only has an ON and OFF button, lasts a couple of hours on the slopes, and its only about $280 if you shop dilagently. Don't sleep on the Vholdr really it sounds perfect for your situation.

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