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Forward lean in boots

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
BOOT QUESTION: From reading your post, it seems that boots are very important to making a quality skier. When I look at boots of skiers it seems that the more advanced you are, the more forward you can lean. I have atomic ski boots and they do not lean forward as much as some do. When I ski I like to lean forward and be as agressive as I can. Most of the time I do this though, my shins will start to hurt. Is there anyway to make the boot lean forward more so my shins can have room to lean.
post #2 of 16
Thread Starter 
After examining my atomic boots and reading my boot manual it seems that my model has no way to change the forward lean. Has anyone else experienced some shin pain from boots with not enough lean?
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Can someone please give me boot expertise which I obviously lack. Any input appreciated. Honestly, before I came to epic I never even knew it was an important piece of equiptment.
post #4 of 16
jclay2, I hope that some of the boot specialists will jump in here. I have some knowledge as a coach who has spent time studying these things, but I do not have the hands-on experience that most of the other "boot guys" do.

That said, I don't want you to go without any answers...

In general, boots are far more upright today than in the past. While some specific boots have more forward lean than most others (the Tecnicas Diablo Race of a couple of years ago come to mind), it seems that a more upright stance is the norm, even for high-end race boots. The reason is that, in general, we want to be balanced over the middle of our skis.

The work that a boot specialist does is to find a boot that is appropriate for your personal morphology (the structure of your body) so that you are in balance when you are at neutral.

So, one place to start: stand more neutral in your boots. Move through your boot cuffs as you ski rather than settling your weight into it and "being aggressive". Think more about balance rather than levering the front of the boot.

There's a lot more, but that's a high-level set of thoughts that I hope will help a bit.
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
SSh, do you think it is possible that in my skiing I am leaning forward to much if my shins are sore sometimes? I am definatly going to think about balance and settling myself into my boots then going forward and "being aggressive." Gosh I just need to get out on the slopes asap.
post #6 of 16
Steve:
You should be posting more often. Well said. Jclay impossible to say if you are leaning forward too much, but boots can cause shin pain without much pressure applied if the area of applied pressure is too small.

In other words the tongue does not spread the pressure out over a large enough area.

Really beyond that is difficult here.
post #7 of 16
Jclay, I don't normally stick my nose in this forum, but I have an additional thought. A boot that actually has too much room can cause what is known as shin-bang. Sometimes, it is possible to snug the liner against the leg and get a more progressive flex by replacing the Velcro power strap with an elastic Booster Strap. If you are not in good contact with the front of your boots, while standing in a balanced fore/aft position, this might be a good inexpensive solution for you.

Another really good way to improve this is to use a heat-molded Intuition liner. These can rejuvenate an older boot and make up for some fitting sins. A boot fitter will normally help you to mold the liners, so that is an opportunity to get a hands-on evaluation. That stuff said, ssh brought up a really good point. Today's skis don't require a whole lot of forward pressure and leveraging. Lessons can teach you to let the equipment work for you, resulting in efficient lower-effort turns, rather than you working your equipment and your body.
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Cirquerider: Do when you buckle your feet in, how tight do you buckle your boots? Am I supposed to make them as tight as possible or what?
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclay2 View Post
Cirquerider: Do when you buckle your feet in, how tight do you buckle your boots? Am I supposed to make them as tight as possible or what?
Not even close!
I ski with my boots buckled where I feel firm contact and the slop is gone. Tighter than that and it would get painful. I have a close enough fit that I can get good response on the first or second buckle, and only go tighter if the situation calls for extra support (high speed and high edge, or very steep)
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclay2 View Post
ssh, do you think it is possible that in my skiing I am leaning forward to much if my shins are sore sometimes? I am definatly going to think about balance and settling myself into my boots then going forward and "being aggressive." Gosh I just need to get out on the slopes asap.
It is certainly possible. I see many higher-level skiers doing this. Their set-up in their boots doesn't help most of the time!

In general, you want to stand on your boots in neutral (right in the center of your boot shaft, approximately even pressure all around). This is a nice "home" position. From there, you can move forward to pressure the front of your skis when you want to do that, but you shouldn't have to move very much, and should be able to move in balance.

Sore shins are a sign of mis-fit in my experience. There can be a number of reasons (as Cirque and Lou outlined), but the bottom line is it's either pressure that's too concentrated or friction resulting from boots that don't hold your shin properly.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclay2 View Post
Cirquerider: Do when you buckle your feet in, how tight do you buckle your boots? Am I supposed to make them as tight as possible or what?
"Snug". You want the boot shell to approximate the shape of your foot and leg. The liner will take up the space, but shouldn't have to take up too much, and shouldn't be relied on to change the fit that the shell would offer. Think of it as padding, not as a fit tool. (BTW, this is a major issue for most people: they think of the foam in the liner as changing the fit when it really doesn't... and in fact will compress over time making those fit "changes" moot.)
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
so how much would it cost to go to a quality fitter and get set up with a good pair of boots that were specific to my foot. I am not asking for a quote just a range in general for the quality experience. Maybe it could be in the budget for next year.
post #13 of 16
$400-$1200, depending on the model, model year, and time of year. Of course, you can go higher than that...
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
wo wo wo wo. Is there anyway I could get it below 300$. Year of model does not matter to me. Quality and price are pretty important, but price is most likely going to have an edge on quality for me. Seriously is there any place that I could have both quality and price, because those prices are very high.
post #15 of 16
jclay2, the nearest bootfitter to you is JDoyle in our boot fitter who's who.
Do yourself a favor and send him a private message.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclay2 View Post
wo wo wo wo. Is there anyway I could get it below 300$. Year of model does not matter to me. Quality and price are pretty important, but price is most likely going to have an edge on quality for me. Seriously is there any place that I could have both quality and price, because those prices are very high.
Possible, but you'll need to work with the fitter to make that work. If you require a footbed, it could cost a good portion of that.
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