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Freestyle pointers please?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
This ski season, I am planning to excessively hang out ins the park for the first time. I was wondering if any of you have any pointers for me. I have always done all the little jumps people have made on the sides of trails but have never really been in the park for a long period of time. I can do spins already, but not very well. Is there a right way to fall if is is inevitable that its going to happen, a right way to land? How to execute? Please give me a few pointers. I am extremely excited to be finally getting into freestyle.
post #2 of 12
fanatic, balance is your friend. Learning to balance over your skis instead of using them as levers and chisels is a good start.

Falling is not that different from on regular terrain... other than you want to avoid the facilities! :

Are you going to consider some training before you go into the park? I'd suggest it as a very good idea.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
If i can conjure up enough money to do a few I plan to get some lessons. I think i am buying the line Anthems. Do they seem like a decent park ski?
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierfanatic View Post
If i can conjure up enough money to do a few I plan to get some lessons. I think i am buying the line Anthems. Do they seem like a decent park ski?
I think you'll get a lot of conversation about gear over on the gear forums...

I haven't skied the Lines, but as I understand them, they are designed to excel in that environment.
post #5 of 12
Fanatic,

#1 Do your mom a favor - wear a helmet and know that most helmets are good for one good whack only
#2 Break your tricks down using the ATML model: Approach, Manuever, Takeoff and Landing - plan each trick and each feature ahead of time
#3 Easy style it means start small and work your way up
#4 Make sure your videos end up on You Tube and Epic instead of America's Funniest

Drunks have less injuries in car crashes because they are loose, but don't drink and steeze please. If you're going to fall, don't fight it. Study the Vermont Safety Research on knee injuries/get the movie. Consider an investment in body armour. There are all sorts of protection out there including cups, wrist guards, hip pads, tailbone protectors and spine protectors. Falling on rails can hurt no matter how loose you are for some strange reason. Putting hard plastic and soft padding between you and solid objects just seems like a good thing to do.
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks! I do and have always wore a helmet heh... I feel weird not wearing one actually. I think I am going to get a new helmet this year though.:
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Fanatic,
#4 Make sure your videos end up on You Tube and Epic instead of America's Funniest
I just noticed you said that and I couldn't stop laughing..
post #8 of 12
yo fanatic!

Right way to fall... it's tough to really explain, but if you've grown up riding bikes and running around, recall how you learned to go-with those falls, usually by sliding somehow, or rolling.

The most important way to minimize damage of falling is to know your park features well, know where to drop in from, what line to take and how fast you need to go to end up somewhere in the ideal landing area. If you come up short or go long, there is usually little you can do except to do your best to soak it up.

If you are coming into the landing area out of balance, it's usually just a matter of getting at least one ski on the snow, and sliding it out somehow; at times that can mean stretching out flat, others it can mean balling up kinda tight. Unfortunately it's pretty much trail & error on this falling thing. I got the chance to learn through all-mountain jumping on (usually) softer snows first.

Watch a lot of park skiers. Take turns following really good riders, and those closer to your own level around and decide what is safe for you to copy.

Do your best to learn to ride features correctly (i.e.) resist the temptation to go off the sides of rail hits etc., use ramps for what they are designed for until you gain the experience to improvise without hurting the features.

Taking a lesson from a freestyle coach, if you can arrange it would be a good thing to do. The way I would handle that would be to hang out in the park and watch for some coaches and watch them work. When you see a coach doing what you think you would like, approach them and ask for their name and card. If there is a freestyle group product available, like a camp or group lesson, take it. It wil get you some basics with an coach who SHOULD be pretty good at it and you will liley meet up with some people to ride with that way.

Just finding a group of riders to hang will be a real bonus and great way to learn too.

Good luck
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for that.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have another question, What are a good few tricks to start with?
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierfanatic View Post
I have another question, What are a good few tricks to start with?
Try just standing on rails, boxes, and tables first. Don't worry about tricks until you make sure you find and can move into balance.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierfanatic View Post
I have another question, What are a good few tricks to start with?
I'm not sure what you mean exactly by what tricks to start with, but it's important to get comfy on new or bigger hits/jumps with straight airs before trying to step up the moves too.

Depending on where you want to take your riding, 180s(noraml takeoff, switch landing) and halfcabs (switch takeoff, normal landing) are basic things that can expand your abilities quickly. If you are totally new to the switch(backwards) thing, get pretty comfortable at varying speeds and going over terrain changes of many kinds switch before incorporating it with jumps in any way.

Grabs are stylie, but have purpose too. They help balance during longer air time or multiple axis spins. To do grabs you need to pull your leg(s) toward the grab as well as reach for it, just doing one will result in trouble.

Safety grab - same hand and ski, outside edge, under boot.

Japan Air - Inside edge of opposite ski - kick one leg out, grab behind the opposite binding heel piece.

Mute Grab - Outside edge of opposite ski, in front of boot
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