EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › from pizza to french fries...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

from pizza to french fries...

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
My girlfriend skied with me this weekend. She had skied one day before, and she did quite well. I taught her to snow plow, and make turns and she does very well at that on the greens. Shes frusterated that she cant learn faster, but shes determined to advance as fast as she can. I am no ski instructer so i need help from the boards:

what do i tell her to concentrate on when changing from snow plow to skiing parralel, (if thats what its called)? She cant stop, only snow plowing til she slows down enough. how do i tell her to stop? what are some tips to tell her while shes working on it. things she knows how to do in everyday life that she can apply so she can feel it quicker.

she wants me to teach her, not an instructer because she feels comfotable with me. the only thing, the longer it takes to teach her, the more time i miss out on skiing the blacks!

all help is appreciated!@!!
post #2 of 16
You can't and from the post alone it sounds like you coud both use a lesson.

Sorry for the terse reply, but reality stings a bit.

If you are dead set on this approach, trot on down to the library and there are a dozen "how to" ski books; some will be current and some will be outdated.

Kinda' like "The Snow Plow" ...... we don't teach that anymore!

I think you should take a look at the charts ... Level 9 .... ???? Are you sure about that?
post #3 of 16
Honestly, you'll probably mess it up, since you won't know what you are looking for, how to continue from one move to the next one, or any other ways to suggest how to get her to do the moves properly. Raising your voice and repeating it over and over again won't cut it.

Don't worry about buying her a lesson. She'll learn that ski instructors are really quite approachable, and will have her skiing better faster than you ever will. Pony up the coin and get her a level III. It will all be worth it, when she proudly shows off her new moves.

It's called win-win: you get to do blacks, and she gets to learn from someone that actually knows how to teach.
post #4 of 16
What a nice guy but... the reason most civilian teaching fails is because the teacher usually only knows one way to do it. If the student does not understand it the way the teacher explains it, both people get frustrated. A good instructor will have a dozen different ways to tell the student to do the same thing. If one doesn't work they just keep varying the instruction until one of the methods clicks with the student. The instructor does not get frustrated, he/she just finds what works with each student and moves on from there. Just enjoy the skiing experience together. Save yurself a lot of grief and let a pro do the teaching.
Tip!
"Speed control through turn shape" If you want to slow down or stop, turn the skis uphill. If you could ski uphill, we'd be out of business. Thanks for creating another skier.
post #5 of 16
The following really make me question what she has been taught up until now. While you may have had the best of intentions teaching her on your own, I think its best for the 2 of you that you stop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scmentz View Post
She cant stop, only snow plowing til she slows down enough. how do i tell her to stop?
:

If you want a ski partner for the long run, get her some lessons.
post #6 of 16
scmentz,

Welcome to Epic again. From a wedge, you stop by turning away from the hill. You are brave to try to teach your girlfriend to ski. It rarely works well. Even ski instructors get another instructor to teach their girlfriends. If she is dead against going on a lesson, book a semi-provate lesson and go with her. Tell the instructor the lesson is for her and you are there for her benefit.

Maybe once she takes a lesson, she will go it alone next time she takes a lesson and you can ski where you like and meet with her after the lesson. It might also ba a good time for you to take a lesson from a different instructor.

RW
post #7 of 16
Friends don't let friends teach significant others.

There are only 3 ways to stop:
1) High edge angles (wide snowplow or hocky stop)
2) Turn (until you're going uphill)
3) Crash

There's only one good way for you to stop. Skip the pizza and fries and splurge on some gourmet lessons.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Skip the pizza and fries and splurge on some gourmet lessons.
Well done sir.
/Golf Clap
post #9 of 16
My husband and I went skiing in Colorado for the 1st time March 2006, and went four times since. We've probably taken up to 1/2 dozen lessons over that time. Our 5th time skiing, we're up to blacks now and we're 40 yrs old. The instructors are terrific and I couldn't imagine trying to learn any other way. If you want to learn fast that's the way to go! We're from Florida and didn't want to ski greens the rest of our lives, which is where we'd still be without lessons.
post #10 of 16
It really is a matter of time versus frustration. The quickest way to great skiing is an excellent coach. Start with the Instructor list here at EpicSki.
post #11 of 16
Dear original poster person,
Are you there?
Wrangler said it best-good on ya' Wrangler.
Here is another idea. Since you are missing out on the steep and deep, strap on tele boards or a snowboard and become a "beginner" again. Then you can wallow in the do-it-yourself realm together. I would rather her find an instructor/coach, and you enjoy the steeps.
post #12 of 16
Yes, "laymen" can (and do) have success in teaching friends/relatives. But technique is only a tiny part of a lesson at this rudimentary level. Choosing the right terrain and lesson locations is a cornerstone to success of a lesson - and it has relatively little to do with what 'technique' or manuvere you are teaching.

You mentioned using 'greens'. ... "greens" is pretty vague. Have you considered any of these questions in developing your lessons?

What are the snow conditions? How long is the run? Is it normally crowded or uncrowded? Is the run wide or narrow? Are there any spots where it is not safe to stop? Is it really cold? Warm? Freshly groomed, or scraped off? Are you skiing during daylight hours, or at night under the lights?

If you choose to take on the role of 'teacher', you have also chosen to take on a 'duty of care', which means you need the answers to those questions and more. Put safety first. You are in charge of the lesson environment and if you manage it properly, ie: creating the conditions that provide the best chance for success - you may not have to 'teach' anything at all. This is part of the 'magic' of ski teaching.

If you make a wrong choice -the implications can be very serious - and again - this has relatively little to do with the techniques or manuveres you are trying to teach. It has everything to do with where, and how you teach it. It doesn't mean you can't teach your girlfriend - but there's much more to it over and above technique.

Technique = 10%. The other 90% - that's where a *good* instructor can really help.
post #13 of 16
Scmentz,


Just a "outside the box" thought.....why don't you look at doing the Level 1 yourself?

It will give you a basic framework for teaching..and it will improve your own skiing in the process....

Sure a L3 is better then a rookie L1....but you with your L1, is better then you without it.
post #14 of 16
I can empathize with your girlfriend, scmentz. When I first started skiing a couple years ago, my girlfriend and the other friends I was skiing with all had 15+ years of experience. And it was especially awkward when my first 1 hour group lesson was pretty much all kids <10 years old. Still, I agree with the others: the best thing you can do is get your girlfriend to take a lesson or two. Private lessons are expensive, but if you can splurge for one (maybe you could help her pay for it as a gift), they're definitely worth it and are MUCH more time-efficient for a beginner than a group lesson. You didn't say where you ski, but I would think any decent ski school could match your girlfriend up with an instructor who would make her feel comfortable and teach her a lot.

If she's as motivated as you say, once she gets the basics and is comfortable on blue slopes, following you down blue slopes and gradually increasing the pitch will help her improve. But, from personal experience, you're both better off if a professional helps her get those basics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ihavethesecret View Post
If you make a wrong choice -the implications can be very serious - and again - this has relatively little to do with the techniques or manuveres you are trying to teach. It has everything to do with where, and how you teach it. It doesn't mean you can't teach your girlfriend - but there's much more to it over and above technique.

Technique = 10%. The other 90% - that's where a *good* instructor can really help.
I think this is pretty accurate. My first day on skis, I learned how to wedge and tried to follow my friends down some easier blue slopes. I felt like I had no control over my speed and couldn't turn well. We ended up at a fork in the trail where one side was closed and the other side was a short, relatively easy, black slope (which was still way more than I was prepared for). Needless to say, I wasn't happy when I got to the bottom of the black slope. Unless your girlfriend is a saint, you really don't want to make the same mistake my friends did.

My second day on skis I invested in a 3 hour private lesson. At the beginning of the lesson, I could get down a green slope relatively comfortably in a wedge. By the end of the lesson I was skiing parallel, getting comfortable controlling my speed on blue slopes and made it down a double blue slope. I'd attribute my improvement to my instructor's selection of slopes (each run was more challenging than the previous one, but not to the point of being overwhelming) as much as his technical instruction.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by scmentz View Post
My girlfriend skied with me this weekend. She had skied one day before, and she did quite well. I taught her to snow plow, and make turns and she does very well at that on the greens. Shes frusterated that she cant learn faster, but shes determined to advance as fast as she can. I am no ski instructer so i need help from the boards:

what do i tell her to concentrate on when changing from snow plow to skiing parralel, (if thats what its called)? She cant stop, only snow plowing til she slows down enough. how do i tell her to stop? what are some tips to tell her while shes working on it. things she knows how to do in everyday life that she can apply so she can feel it quicker.

she wants me to teach her, not an instructer because she feels comfotable with me. the only thing, the longer it takes to teach her, the more time i miss out on skiing the blacks!

all help is appreciated!@!!
Hi Scmentz,

Some of our members were kinda hard on you but they speak the truth. You said it yourself, this is taking up the time that I could be on the blacks. Take the advice and put her in a class with someone who gets paid to teach skiing, and you go hoot it up on the blacks. But if you have to teack her, teach her how to turn to slow down or stop. My two cents worth.------Wigs
post #16 of 16
this is a topic that seems to come up a lot both here and on TGR.

the general concensus i have gotten from perusing a number of similar threads is to do the following:

1. put the wife/GF in a morning lesson.
2. then you go out and rip laps
3. meet at lunch
4. have a leisurly lunch and engage in conversation about what she learned in the lesson.
5. ski with her after lunch and practise/let her show you what she was taught.

6. repeat several times until she is comfortable riding with you on the terrain you like.

above all, do not teach her yourself (as has been stated). That will strain the relationship no matter how good a teacher you are.

i have a good friend who is at most an advanced beginner snowboarder. she insists on convincing friends to try snowboarding and teaches them. so far she is 0 for 5 in that everybody she has "taught" never wants to take the sport up again. as stated, often the best of intentions are ill-conceived.

so, put your lady in a lesson!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › from pizza to french fries...