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Looking to buy some Marker Duke AT bindings (what boots?)

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Never in my life have I used an Apline Touring binding or boot. I consider myself to be an advanced backcountry skiier. I'm mainly in the powder or in between the trees and this year I plan on doing a lot of heli skiing...

I've been looking into the new Marker duke bindings and they seem like a great cross between both worlds. I think they might be a little on the heavy side but I would be willing to make that sacrifice if they are really as nice as people are saying.

Since I've never actually done any Alpine Touring skiing I was wondering if I am forced to buy a pair of Alpine Touring boots or if I can use my existing Atomic Hawx H100 boots with this binding.

I'd be curious to see what anyone has to say about this but mainly I'm just wondering if this new Duke binding from Marker requires an actual AT boot or if it will work with any boot such as my Atomics.

This is definitely a new venture for me so forgive all the questions!
post #2 of 19
The Duke is designed to take both regular alpine and AT standard boots. There's a screw thingy in the front for the adjustment.

The details of the binding have been deeply discussed at TGR and here. Obviously there are not many folks with many miles on them yet. Initial reactions are very favorable - at least if your emphasis is on the turns. The search function will be your friend.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks buddy! I'll check out all the info I can find. I think I might be one of the few that tests them out this year to find out if I like them or not.
post #4 of 19
i'm confused.

how can you be an advanced back country skier if you've never done any touring?

(or are you mostly doing cat, sled, and heli accessed BC?)



anyway, as Spindrift said, the Duke can take both Alpine and AT boots (so can Fritsche Freerides and Naxo21's, for that matter).

i'm new to the whole BC thing, so i'll mostly be venturing out on small boot packs at first and resort OB. for that i'm just going to tough it out with my Hot Rods until i decide if i really like hiking for turns.

personally, i wouldn't rush out and spend the $$ on AT boots if you're not really going to be doing long tours and hiking a ton with a pack and skinning, etc.

you can always rent/demo some AT boots, too. and you can always rent/demo skis with AT bindings on them.



and while i've never done any Heli Skiiing, from what i have seen it's not a requirement to have AT set-ups for that, especially if they're just dropping you at the top of a slope and you're gonna rail down it. if you're mostly gonna be doing cat/sled/heli BC then you probably won't need an AT boot anyway and would more than likely benefit from the added burl of your Atomics.

mostly the advantage of an AT binding is for folks who plan to hike for their turns, though the debate is still out on the added weight of the Dukes and how they perform for longer treks for untouched.

i rode a pair last April and loved the burly feel inbounds as compared to the more "flimsy" feel of the Freerides inbounds.

whether or not i'll feel the extra weight on short walks/traverses remains to be seen.

if you don't really need new bindings, i'd probably wait. or at least demo Dukes, Fritsches, Naxos, to see if you like their vibe.
post #5 of 19
The Marker Duke works with either Alpine DIN or AT ISO boots. Changing between the two is a simple matter of adjusting the toe height of the binding, by adjusting the sliding anti friction device ("AFD). Duke bindings are capable of alpine touring by releasing the heel. The only reason to use this feature is if you actually hike, using alpine touring skins. If you don't need that feature, the Marker Jester is a similar binding with 16 DIN release, but no touring lift. In fact any alpine race binding will give you the solid connection and higher release settings at a lower cost. I've got the bindings, but lack snow, so really can't offer much in the way of real experience on them yet.

I assume you obtain the necessary backcountry safety gear from your guides.
post #6 of 19
Not that it matters if you are using Alpine boots, but the Jester is Alpine only. No boot type adjustment...

Cirque, studying for your entry to the diplomatic corps?
post #7 of 19
If you want my better side, read the Politics and Hot Topic threads in the supporter section. I swear, one of these days, I'm gonna let loose and swear again...or revive the Charlotte Moats is Hot as Hell thread.

Edit: On second thought, I think I'll poke Atomicman.
post #8 of 19

The new gold standard for AT boots.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Garmont Axon Alpine Touring Boots
$ 829.99

Arriving in limited quantities beginning December 7th Looking for a boot that can ski anywhere, with no compromises in downhill performance or back country “tour ability”? One that’s compatible with Dynafit, Fritschi, Silvretta, or even ISO-DIN Alpine bindings? For you demanding customers, Garmont is offering the Axon boot in time for this ski season. This boot is based on the proven 4-buckle Adrenalin, and features interchangeable rubber-lug touring soles and ISO-DIN soles that will fit into your resort-only alpine rig. These boots also feature G-Fit heat moldable liners, and the quality that you’ve come to expect from Garmont’s Italian factory.
post #9 of 19
Sounds like an Adrenaline with Dynafit compatibility.
post #10 of 19
If you have never used an AT binding or boot, the Marker Dukes are going to be lighter than you have experienced, not heavier. Might be a good bridge for you. Traditional AT bindings are well lighter than the Duke.
post #11 of 19
There is no significant difference in weight between the Duke and the Freeride + or Naxos N21. Dynafit, well that's different.
post #12 of 19

well... not exactly

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman View Post
There is no significant difference in weight between the Duke and the Freeride + or Naxos N21. Dynafit, well that's different.
Actual measured weights (from Lou Dawson's website wildsnow.com):

Marker Dukes: 1334 gr 47.1 oz
Fritschi Freeride Plus, with brake and screws, size medium (06/07) 1022 gr 36 oz
Naxo NX 21, with brake and screws, size medium (06/07) 1191 gr 42 oz Naxo NX01, with brake and screws, size medium (04/05) 1128 gr 39.8 oz

If you are touring, that's real weight on your feet compared to the freerides (about 3/4 of a pound). The Dynafits are only about 450gms.
post #13 of 19
Why is it people want boots based on binding or ski compatibility rather than based on foot compatibility? Just saying.
post #14 of 19
dp, I know the weighs (have bookmarked Lou's page). Also I have both the Freeride + and Duke bindings.

With all of the focus on binding weight, the weight of the skis, boots, skins and all the other crap taken BC tends to get overlooked.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
and features interchangeable rubber-lug touring soles and ISO-DIN soles that will fit into your resort-only alpine rig..
can someone clarify this blurb about the Axon from Mountain Gear?

"Triple-duty, interchangeable sole: lugged sole for ski mountaineering works with AT bindings; DIN-compatible sole works with the quick-release functions of alpine bindings; Dynafit-compatible sole works with Dynafit bindings"

the lugged sole and the dynafit sole are the same thing right? The blurb makes it sound like there are 3 distinct soles..

Axon and Duke have nice matching colors FWIW..
post #16 of 19
Axon for those that haven't seen it yet:





The dynafit patent has expired and you may start seeing more entries from other boot manufacturers and perhaps other 2-point bindings. This will lead to a real dichotomy in touring equipment as boots get lighter and stiffer, and more companies throw themselves at engineering 2 point attachment systems that compete with heavyweight gear like the Duke.

The question on triple duty, I would think is DIN, ISO and Dynafit with both a flat DIN and lugged ISO sole and the new addition of 2-point fittings.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
The question on triple duty, I would think is DIN, ISO and Dynafit with both a flat DIN and lugged ISO sole and the new addition of 2-point fittings.
that makes sense, that's basically what I thought. Interesting you say the DIN sole could be used with Dynafit, can't see why you'd want to that though.
post #18 of 19
You're asking me?

I've never even attached the DIN soles on my Adrenalins, but have replaced the lug sole once. The toe wears and tears on the rocks.
post #19 of 19

How many boots and bindings do you really need?

Things are definitely getting complicated with boot and binding compatibility. If you have a heavy duty binding that can easily be used with both AT and alpine boots (like the Duke or Freerides), I don’t see the need for AT boots that can change into alpine binding compatibility by changing the soles. Does anyone really want to hassle with that? When would you want to use your AT boots on your alpine ski bindings? You wouldn't have them if you didn't already have alpine boots.

Am I missing something? If you have a binding that can be used with AT and alpine boots, that is basically as stable as an alpine binding, when is there a need to use your AT boots in alpine bindings?
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Looking to buy some Marker Duke AT bindings (what boots?)