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I keep breaking my gear

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I continue to suffer from problems with broken skis and boots. I am only 5'8" and 160 lbs, but have good explosive power (I could dunk a basketball before screwing up my knees). A few years ago, I was skiing on Rossi 9x Pro 193cm. I delaminated the tails of 3 sets in 7 days of skiing. I switched to Salomon X-Scream 187cm and bent 2 in 2 days. I switched to K2 Mod X 188cm and, wonder of wonders, they lasted 2 years until I hit a rock. This year, I went fat with the Scott Santiago (only sold in Europe - 185cm, 118-83-106). I like the ski on both hardpack (It out carves my ModX) and powder, but I just delaminated the tip. In the course of these ski problems, I have also broken the shell of my Tecnica boots 3 times.

Question 1: Should I be discarding all recommendations on ski length? I have been going on the assumption that a longer ski is designed to tolerate higher forces without breaking or permenently bending. I am willing to sacrifice low speed performance for durability.

Question 2: Is anybody else having these problems? The manufacturers tell me no.

Question 3: Do you think a Dynastar Skicross 9/10 will hold up?
post #2 of 20
skimogently.

skimogroomers.

(sorry first thing in am before coffee, little catty.)

good lord man, what are you doing to that equipment!!! Bode dosent break as many skis as that!

how, exactly does this stuff get broken, on bumps? or hucking or what???
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by LindaA:
how, exactly does this stuff get broken, on bumps? or hucking or what???
Sometimes ungroomed steeps, usually bumps.
post #4 of 20
skimo, I would say you are a bit of an exception. Could I suggest you ask an instructor to examine how you ski. They may be able to give you a few tips to reduce the damage.

Your first assumption is not necessarily correct. The longer ski may actually experience greater bending than the shorter one under the same load... Try this: Attach a 100N force to the tip of a 190cm ski. Measure the deflection. Now attach the same force to the same model ski but a 150cm. The deflection will probably be less.
Also, if you're going over bumps, on a longer ski it could be resting the tip on the top of one, and the tail on the top of another, so the middle will either be in the air, or significantly bent. With a shorter ski on the same bumps, you won't have the length to be at the top of each bump, so the distance in the middle to the ground will be reduced.

Just a couple of thoughts.

S
post #5 of 20
If you are having all these problems with your equipment, think of what skiing like this must be doing to your poor body.

...oh, wait ... you sorta mentioned that.

One suggestion: Search on Pierre's comments in the technique forum of Epic on skiing smoothly in bumps. He discusses both the advantages and the techniques to do so.

Tom / PM

[ March 13, 2003, 07:25 AM: Message edited by: PhysicsMan ]
post #6 of 20
skimobumps, if you want to be bumps with race style ski, except the X-Scream, you may want to take some lessons and learn how to ski the bumps. Other then a group of racers, I have not heard of anybody breaking as much equipment as you. My God Man, what are you doing wrong?
At 5'8" 160lbs. why are you on such long skis? Are you tring to make up for short comings somewhere else? Just kidding. You need to be on short skis and ski the bumps top to bottom not left to right. On my 177cm G3's at my age I try to ski the bumps slow and in control, control being the key word here. It's really not about who can get down the bumps first. You didn't say your age so I'll assume your not 17. If you want to keep skiing till your old you have to learn control. Sure I'm 48 and like to ski at high speeds, but I pick my days when I can ski fast and hard.
post #7 of 20
Ask a cert. instructor as many have mentioned. And uhh, at your rate the Dynastars won't hold up......my titanium driver wouldn't hold up to you.
post #8 of 20
Stuff breaks, look for deals.
post #9 of 20
In the late '70's and early '80's I had a similar problem with ski equipment. The difference is the gear now is much more durable and better built than the gear of yesteryear.

Regardless, I hope you are being comped new gear by the manufactures. With the exception of hitting something hard like a rock, gear should not bread or bend with use even hard use by someone of your weight, unless you are skiing skis that are entirely too short for your skill and weight.

That said, technique is a real issue. I stopped bending skis on a yearly basis when I became a bit older and my overly aggressive style started causing injuries. I now ski more softly and I tend to break or bend a ski every 3 years not every year.

Lastly, you need to seriously address equipment v. terrain issues. Stiff slalom skis won't do in the bump, at least for long.

My Thoughts: Select your gear for the terrain you ski. Focus on technique, learn to ski aggressively but with a softer style. Make sure the manufactures comp you for gear damaged within the normal parameters of skiing. Expand your budget, you will break gear at a higher rate than your peers.

As for the Dynastar skis, I love the way they ski but I will not buy Dynastar. In late March 1995 I bought a pair of the Assault V8's. After less than 15 days of use, the skis broke at mid shovel. The break caused a bad fall and concussion. I was less than pleased. Dynastar refused to comp me a new pair of skis and would give no reason. My local shop thought it was because the skis were purchased in March of 1995 and they broke in early January of 1996.

Don't buy Dynastar.

Mark
post #10 of 20
Hit the ski swaps.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by skimobumps:
Question 1: Should I be discarding all recommendations on ski length? I have been going on the assumption that a longer ski is designed to tolerate higher forces without breaking or permenently bending. I am willing to sacrifice low speed performance for durability.

Question 2: Is anybody else having these problems? The manufacturers tell me no.

Question 3: Do you think a Dynastar Skicross 9/10 will hold up?
Quote:
Originally posted by Maddog1959:
I stopped bending skis on a yearly basis when I became a bit older and my overly aggressive style started causing injuries.

Mark
skimobumps,

I'm curious, how old are you? As I was reading down the page of responses I had a response of my own in mind and then I read Maddog's post - and initially thought he offered my answer - my thoughts are along similar lines.

I went through a period in my skiing when I was skiing bumps all day, every day; my skiing was very (overly?) aggressive, I jumped off everything that got in my way and I was destroying skis left and right. The solution for me came in the form of improvement as a skier; as I learned to ski better I was actually skiing harder than I had in the past, but I was skiing much smoother. And, magically, the carnage stopped. I haven't bent or broken anything in the last twenty years.

My answers to all three of your questions is an emphatic NO! As suggested by several others, you should seek asylum in the safety of your nearest ski school. [img]graemlins/angel.gif[/img]

IG
post #12 of 20
skimobumps,

If you love to ski the bumps you need a bump ski. Any ski with metal will bend if enough stress is applied. The Rossi 9X is loaded with metal. You may even try park skis like the Rossi Scratch (No metal.) Most bumpers don't use twin tips in the bumps but some do.

Your technique and tactics in the bumps is going to be different if you want to ski race skis in the bumps versus bump skis. I ski the Rossi 9X 181cm everywhere, including the bumps. I've had them two seasons, almost 100 days skiing and their not bent yet.

Jim
post #13 of 20
Back in the 80s (or was it late 70s), Elan used to make a re-bendable model (I don't remember which one) . It's just anecdotal evidence, but I heard it from skiers who bought their Elans in those times in Eastern Europe that they bent a ski and then it "just unbent" after 15-20 minutes of sitting there... (must have been birch core and very thin metal foil for the topsheet, with aluminum edges : [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img] )

[ March 13, 2003, 01:50 PM: Message edited by: AlexG ]
post #14 of 20
Ski around the bumps not through them.

Here endeth the lesson.

"be like water, my friend." - Bruce Lee
post #15 of 20
This problem can only be one of two things :
1-this guy baited the hook and ya all have taken it.
2-he needs to learn how to ski.
post #16 of 20
If so much stuff is breaking the problem is the Indian, not the arrow. Go with 185's or whatever comes to your hair line at the forhead. I'm not surprised the Mods held up for 2 years. But hitting a rock will do any ski in. [Hitting a land mine ain't necessarily your fault; happens to all of us.]

Above was good advice in finding some help with technique. There are many out there who are very agressive but don't break stuff. Some practice with extremely low DIN settings to see how smoothly they can ski and not come out of the skis and still ski agressively. They do this as a drill.
post #17 of 20
Skimo--two thoughts:

1) The toughest skis are those without layers of metal in them (but there are performance sacrifices).

2} If you're breaking that much stuff, you are doing something wrong--and I agree with PhysicsMan that you can't break that many skis without doing a number on your body as well. The suggestions for a lesson are worth considering....

If that isn't an option, post some pictures or (better) some video of yourself skiing, and let us take a look.

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #18 of 20
This guy's full of sh!t.
post #19 of 20
I have done some insane skiing in my time. Like full tuck shussing mogul fields. Stuck a Dynastar Omega GS ski with metal into a mogul right up to the binding. Have never bent or broken a ski. Bent some poles, and broke the plate of a spademan binding, but never a ski. Saw a broken one being carried down the mountain today. A Rossi. Guy hit a lift tower. OUCH.
post #20 of 20
The only time I broke a ski was off a jump when I was 17 and tried a back scratcher and overshot the landing area and landed hard on the the shovel of one ski - snapped it right off and suffered the consequences. I've known some awfully aggressive skiers in my time, and none of them have this track record - though the trail of surgeries some of them have had would be longer than War and Peace. I agree with Leeroy - we've either taken it hook, line and sinker or skimo is not someone I want to be on a hill with!
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