or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Skier's Ego - Page 2

post #31 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
Be in a state of harmony with the mountain, not conquering the mountain.

The pure joy of skiing involves being centered and letting go of ego.

Not to get too Zen or anything, but this is probably the coolest thing about skiing - living in the moment, "between Heaven and Earth".
post #32 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Not to get too Zen or anything, but this is probably the coolest thing about skiing - living in the moment, "between Heaven and Earth".
Ditto!
post #33 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Not to get too Zen or anything, but this is probably the coolest thing about skiing - living in the moment, "between Heaven and Earth".

Yes, there is a lot of wisdom to be found in the Buddhist Dharma. Ego is the biggest obstacle to wisdom and mindfullness, not to mention peace. It makes us do funny things that distract us from the reality of the moment and the bare fact that we are all the same thing - pure awareness hiding behind the facade of individuality. We are constantly being distracted from the ultimate contentment that can only be found in the journey, not the destination. There is no destination, and there never has been. Wherever you go, there you are.
post #34 of 69
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulR View Post
. Ego is the biggest obstacle to wisdom and mindfullness,.... Wherever you go, there you are.

What he said. Now that is gettin' down!
post #35 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulR View Post
Yes, there is a lot of wisdom to be found in the Buddhist Dharma. Ego is the biggest obstacle to wisdom and mindfullness, not to mention peace. It makes us do funny things that distract us from the reality of the moment and the bare fact that we are all the same thing - pure awareness hiding behind the facade of individuality. We are constantly being distracted from the ultimate contentment that can only be found in the journey, not the destination. There is no destination, and there never has been. Wherever you go, there you are.
So, is there an eightfold path to better skiing? Or four noble truths? I know that for me, bumps = suffering!
post #36 of 69
Shut up and go ski! Go do!
post #37 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
Do skiers (as a group) have an ego problem?
You might call this phenomon a "ski-go" problem..
post #38 of 69
Thread Starter 

Instinctual behavior in skiing

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulR View Post
This latent instinct hangs around in the periphery of the pysche and transfers into everyday existence. It displays itself as a need for superiority over other competitors.
Going further, I wonder why skiing is so pleasurable to people, you can see it in the 5 year olds bombing the mountain, laughing and singing as they ski. I think it derives genetically from primal predator behavior, Neanderthal man moving quickly and smoothly over terrain to hunt more effectively. Coping with moments of intense fear and extreme difficulty to survive. Humans have a remarkable body and an aggressive psyche for basic reasons.
post #39 of 69
From a shop guy point of view, I think that yes many skiers have an ego problem (the bad kind). And sadly it is mostly us males who suffer from it. As a bootfitter I am faced with it on a daily basis. In walks Joe Skier and he sits at my fitting bench. I ask the standard questions and his answers are "I can ski anything" or "I am an expert". I am sorry but how can a person who lives in the Chicago area and skies 8 days per year consider themselves an expert? To me this is an ego issue. This guy is probably like this in most every aspect of his life and not just skiing but this is where I get to see it. I have actually thought about this for years and one reason I see for the ego is this. Skiing is a 100% individual sport, there are no teamates to blame if things go wrong, it's you and the hill. As such a skier has him or herself to blame if they suck or rock. IMO this can lead to a false sence of ability.
post #40 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
As if he could. Guys are banned at skidiva. :
not phil---
post #41 of 69
It's Phyllis ... when "he's" over there.

I'm still waiting for him to return my fishnets & pumps.
post #42 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Skiing under the chair is part of the "Code" and safety recitation you have to give during intro classes. As a violation of "The Code", you could get canned as an instructor ...
I never ever heard that about skiing under a chair; stopping a group under a chair is another story. You are never supposed to hang out with your group under a chair. There are plenty of trails I can think of where you can't get down without skiing part of the way under the lift.

I don't make a habit of skiing under lifts on purpose but I know that occasionally a group I'm with is going to make a few turns under a lift but eventually stop on the side of the trail not under the lift.

Fun exercise-- Play slalom with the shadows of the chairs as the come up the lift. Best to do when the sun as at an angle such that the shadows are not in line with the lift towers.
post #43 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Shut up and go ski! Go do!

There ain't nothing open here yet ! I am patiently waiting. Supposedly Peak n Peak opens up Saturday and Holiday Valley Sunday.
post #44 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post
From a shop guy point of view, I think that yes many skiers have an ego problem (the bad kind). And sadly it is mostly us males who suffer from it. As a bootfitter I am faced with it on a daily basis. In walks Joe Skier and he sits at my fitting bench. I ask the standard questions and his answers are "I can ski anything" or "I am an expert". I am sorry but how can a person who lives in the Chicago area and skies 8 days per year consider themselves an expert? To me this is an ego issue. This guy is probably like this in most every aspect of his life and not just skiing but this is where I get to see it. I have actually thought about this for years and one reason I see for the ego is this. Skiing is a 100% individual sport, there are no teamates to blame if things go wrong, it's you and the hill. As such a skier has him or herself to blame if they suck or rock. IMO this can lead to a false sence of ability.
I think this is more of a machismo thing than an ego-driven thing. It's a pretty natural 'guy' thing to do. "I can ski anything" translates to 'I am fearless and rough and tumble". Many will be relcutant to say something less to another guy, especially an expert in a boot shop. For instance, I bet you have never heard from a younger guy 'I like to ski slower and am afraid to ski on steep trails', especially if they brought their wife/girflirend with them to the shop. Guys(especially youth) don't like admitting to things that can be perceived as a weakness, especially to other guys. Also, I don't think most skiers know what expert really means and think it means they can 'get down' a black diamond or a steep and nasty trail etc. What you are describing seems more like keeping up with the jone's.
post #45 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Shut up and go ski! Go do!
^Excellent! Yuki talks like Yoda: Do or do not. There is no "try." As for the rest, it's all ego/opinion/external and YMMV...
post #46 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
Going further, I wonder why skiing is so pleasurable to people, you can see it in the 5 year olds bombing the mountain, laughing and singing as they ski. I think it derives genetically from primal predator behavior, Neanderthal man moving quickly and smoothly over terrain to hunt more effectively. Coping with moments of intense fear and extreme difficulty to survive. Humans have a remarkable body and an aggressive psyche for basic reasons.
The fact is, modern Man's life for the most part is very structured and regimented like no other time in history. We are no longer running around the plains and fields changing our hunting grounds every year at the cycle of the seasons. Accept for the walk to the car we spend most of our day in large box-style sheltered enclosures seperated from nature. We get easily bored and distracted, and need an outlet to keep our sanity by stepping out of the confines of this self-imposed exile from nature.

Activities like skiing offer the much needed stimulation and a recconect with the natural. Unfortunately, the trend seems to be the use of virtual reality to create the needed stimulation. Man is slowly distancing himself ever further from his roots in nature and is escaping into the world of the XBox, The Internet, and Cable TV. I think activities like skiing,hiking, cycling and all that good stuff is slowly being pushed out by the Xbox.: Many would rather spend their free time with a Twinkie in one hand and a game controller in the other.
post #47 of 69
Thread Starter 

Ego purchases fuel the local 2nd hand market

Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post
yes many skiers [shoppers at this poiint] have an ego problem (the bad kind).
Misrepresenting their ability to the shop guy to make an impression is a good thing. Here's how it could work:

You sell them exactly :what they area asking for, say Legend Pro's, a strong ski for a strong skier. Then they discover they can't make a turn with the LP's,: and bring them back for something they can turn.

I pick up the barely used LP's from you on consignment for the depreciated value of $450, and give you a kick-back for your efforts.

Perfect! Everyone gets what they need, eventually.
post #48 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
Misrepresenting their ability to the shop guy to make an impression is a good thing. Here's how it could work:

You sell them exactly :what they area asking for, say Legend Pro's, a strong ski for a strong skier. Then they discover they can't make a turn with the LP's,: and bring them back for something they can turn.

I pick up the barely used LP's from you on consignment for the depreciated value of $450, and give you a kick-back for your efforts.

Perfect! Everyone gets what they need, eventually.
Now that's funny
post #49 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post
Now that's funny
Especially if one is a "strong skier" with "no ego"...
post #50 of 69
Primal instincts and skiing? that was funny! rotfl

[hushed commentator's voice] Here's comes Joe Suburbia, gliding to a stop above "Whiskey Meadow," rated Green, but as everyone knows, it's a lot like some Blues in time zones further east......he surveys the field, then zeroes in on his target: the base lodge.....shhhh...he's turning his ski tips....oh, wait!....Joe, if you're gonna ski like that, you step with your *uphill* ski...he doesn't care...he's skiing on instinct, oh WAIT!...he's assumed the tuck!....his fanny's in the air and his pole tips are pointing at the sun, but he's picking up speed....ladies and gentlemen, behold the purity: man at one with his mountain....he'll get to his target soon and slay that $18 bowl of chili like the predator he is.....this is why he comes here from Parsippany every President's day...to feel like a man again!
[/hushed commentator's voice]
post #51 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
Do skiers (as a group) have an ego problem?
It seems to me that since you are asking this question, it is likely you that have a problem. It smacks of some of your other posts where you bitch and moan about pretentious, rude and arrogant skiers at Squaw. Get over it already, and quit fishing for others to sooth your poor hurt feelings that you must share the mountain with the impure.

It amazes me that you can't recognise that you are every bit as contemptuously arrogant as those you seek to subtly ridicule by your disingenuous questioning. Your contempt for others seems thick and fetid to me.
post #52 of 69
:





post #53 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
:





Hey, there's nothing subtle about my ridicule.

As for contempt for posers, well I've got that too (not to mention contempt for myself, only an idiot would collect obsolete steel skis to the excessive degree I do), but I don't start threads making broad spectrum generalizations about skiers as a group.

Further, I don't like when people equate ego with arrogance, or being insecure. Ego is there for a divine purpose, so we can distinguish the difference between ourselves and everything else. When this purpose is denied then one begins to define themselves by things that they are not.

I say this sort of thread is more about sowing dissention than not, and my previous post is evidence of where it leads, frak! I love philisophical questions, but not when they require someone to be wrong by the framing of the inquiry. It an attack, but nicely worded to seem like something else.
post #54 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
Ego is there for a divine purpose, so we can distinguish the difference between ourselves and everything else.
Great line. Thanks for bringing a dose of reality into the conversation. I quite like it when people understand the literal meanings of words.

ego and egocentric are quite different.

Nonetheless, just to prod the beast a bit... would VA's definition above prove that those that follow a Jungian theory are void of ego? And therefor, Jungians can't ski?

I'm quite the Jungian myself... and I fricking rip. (no egocentrism deliberated.)
post #55 of 69
The meaning of ego was elucidated several posts ago.

Not acknowledging it till it's directed at you is egocentric.

Can we all just go ski now? Or maybe we can chat about this in line at our TA's office hours? Jung and skiing.....dude
post #56 of 69
He wasn't directing it at me! I just liked his line. (no... not davluri's defn of line either.)

Anyway, faber, I always get reminded of college when I read your posts. Ironically, I too graduated from MSU Bozeman.
post #57 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
Great line. Thanks for bringing a dose of reality into the conversation. I quite like it when people understand the literal meanings of words.

ego and egocentric are quite different.

Nonetheless, just to prod the beast a bit... would VA's definition above prove that those that follow a Jungian theory are void of ego? And therefor, Jungians can't ski?

I'm quite the Jungian myself... and I fricking rip. (no egocentrism deliberated.)
Like fan and fanatic?
post #58 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
Anyway, faber, I always get reminded of college when I read your posts. Ironically, I too graduated from MSU Bozeman.
I didn't graduate from MSU-Bozeman. Never was a student there. My sheepskins are, by Montana standards, imported.

But I do remember your ties to the area. I bet college here is memorable.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Like fan and fanatic?
Isn't fan, as in a sports fan, short for fanatic?

--for anyone who still cares--

Egocentrism, according to cognitive psych types, is a developmental flaw, unless you are about 7 or younger. It is the ability to perceive the world only as it relates to you. Late childhood adds the dyad (the ability to understand a second party's perception) and pubescence/adolescence adds the triad (understanding one or more third-party perceptions on the dyad). Maturity/adulthood should add the alter ego (the ability to reflect on yourself in an abstracted manner).

Different schools of psychology will quibble over the precise lines of demarcation between each stage, but that's a very generalized synopsis.

So, like Samurai, Volantaddict, and a few others before pointed out, *EGO* is the conception/construction of self. That's it. It can be healthy, centered, overly centered, inflated, flawed, underdeveloped, etc., but it just refers to the self. (In Latin, it means "I")

In popular usage, it has taken on other meanings, which is what the OP was after, I think.

BTW, most psychologists assert that few, very few, people reach full emotional and social maturity in all components of the psyche. Of course, they might be saying that to keep themselves employed
post #59 of 69
Accept Dr. Sigmund as a coke fired, psychotic nut case who commited suicide and you may place a little less stock in his "genius" and definitions.

Put three monkeys in a room and listen to them debating the nature of imaginary dragons ... while it may be quite entertaining ... how much bearing does it have on reality

:
post #60 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Accept Dr. Sigmund as a coke fired, psychotic nut case who commited suicide and you may place a little less stock in his "genius" and definitions.

Put three monkeys in a room and listen to them debating the nature of imaginary dragons ... while it may be quite entertaining ... how much bearing does it have on reality

:
That depends, are the monkeys Macaque, Colobus, or Red Howlers?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion