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Newbie goggles questions: confused

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi all.

I like skiing with glasses on (avoiding contacts) and for the past few years I've had a glass retainer (to hold them in case of a crash) and an OTG goggle on top of it. This seemed to work fine (except for one nasty crash when the glasses moved). I was very happy with my Smith Monashee (amber color), and I understand that this color blocks blue-light well, which is important to me since I'm prone to cataracts.

I'm looking to trade up to the Smith Knowledge OTG which is more impact resistant. The problem is this: I can't for the life of me (from the Smith website or from other sources) figure out anything about the lenses.

By default, it comes with RC36, whose color I can't really figure out.
http://www.smithoptics.com/Knowledge-OTG_14_468.html


In some places, I've seen the option of a Chrome amplifier (not sure what that is), and other places offer an ignitor mirror or a sensor mirror (again, no idea).

Which should I choose ?

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 14
I wear corrective lenses since I was in 3rd grade, my vision without them is extremely poor. That being said I would not ever consider skiing with glasses instead of contacts. The benefits of contacts are so obviously many its silly to even mention...why do you prefer glasses? (I so realize some people cant wear contacts).
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
My vision is horrible (-8D)

However, I've never actually used contacts, the idea of messing like that with my eyes just freaks me out, I guess. I see my fiance fighting with hers once in a while and it doesn't make me want to deal with them. It's just not an option for me, and the OTG glasses performed great so far.


What are the advantages of contacts in skiing? If you use a retainer, your glasses are relatively safe. (though one time I fell bad, and they cut me on the side of the nose)
post #4 of 14
Peripheral vision, does not fog up, does not move, you dont even know they are there, if you fall they dont fall off/out (if they do then you probably have much more serious things to worry about at that point).

I struggled when I first got my contacts (7th grade, Im 36 now) but you get the hang of putting them in very quickly, now I can do it with one hand, no mirror, sitting in the dark. I suggest you give them a try, you are missing a lot of world with glasses, take it from me -7.5

Now-a-days lenses are ultra thin and disposable, I cant imagine, other than medical or fashion reason, why anyone would elect to wear glasses over contacts.

Next on my list is surgery...away with all you damned lenses!
post #5 of 14
RC36 is a rose-colored lens that's meant to be a good all-around lens.

Sensor mirror gets really good reviews for flat light, but might not work in bright sunlight.
Not sure about the other two

fwiw, my Fuse goggles with the sensor mirror lens came with an extra RC36 lens too
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

Contacts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Now-a-days lenses are ultra thin and disposable, I cant imagine, other than medical or fashion reason, why anyone would elect to wear glasses over contacts.
Next on my list is surgery...away with all you damned lenses!
I don't know. I'm fairly clumsy and I held out so far...
Though I may have to try them for my upcoming wedding..
My big fear is getting them in and not getting them out and so on, I've seen too many bad things happen to people.

As for surgery, I would be careful about that. If you're beyond 6D you're already at a significant risk for retinal detachment. It's really not pretty when that happens (saw it several times in my family and I'm pretty much due for one). A surgery doesn't correct the actual abnormality that causes the detachment, but it may increase your risk. I would ask a very good retinal specialist before I went to a surgeon.

Anyway, any idea about the goggles question ?
post #7 of 14
Probably the best OTG goggle is the Smith Turbo fan Knowledge OTG goggle. I got a new pair with sensor mirror lenses this summer under $60 on SAC and plan to give it away as a Christmas gift to my brother in law who is too stubborn to get his eyes fixed too.

I can't imagine going through your whole life wearing coke bottles in front of your eyes. The current medical literature does not suggest a significant risk of retinal detachment for high corrective Lasik surgury. In the current century, we don't do PRK and similar more risky corrections common in the 80s and 90s anymore. Consult your opthomologist. The beneits of good vision in athletic activities is hard to quantify. I had Lasik at least 6 years ago, and continue to have normal vision without glasses. The idea of going back to contacts, or worse, lenses that get rained on, fogged up and are a hazard in collisions and... well you know the problems. Its awful to live around something that can be fixed once and forever. Check your facts and go with what your doctor recommends.
post #8 of 14
speak of the Devil, look what just showed up on SAC!

[img]http://images.steepandcheap.com/imag...262/PHNCHG.jpg[/img]
post #9 of 14
Hi Uricmu,
I agree that it would be a good idea to try contacts. I always use contacts (I can use one lens for distance) for sports. They aren't too difficult to get used to (especially soft disposable lenses). The only time I've had difficultly getting one out was when I left it in too long and it dried up (saline alleviates that problem). As for Lasik, I would check with your ophthalmologist about your particular circumstances (it's not recommended for everyone, me for example).
Another suggestion if you don't want to try contacts, is to call Smith Optics. We had a problem with an order we had placed and I was really pleased with the degree of help they offerred to resolve the issue.
Hope you have a great season!!
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
speak of the Devil, look what just showed up on SAC!

[img]http://images.steepandcheap.com/imag...262/PHNCHG.jpg[/img]
Dang, I only saw it now when it's already gone... How much was it for and was it the mirror version?

So should I get the mirror or the regular one ?
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
By the way, I still don't understand what the "mirror lens" does. Does it just "look cool" from the outside, or is there a benefit on the inside?
post #12 of 14
My understanding is, using mirror coatings allows control of very specific light wavelengths to reach lens, which can be another color to further refine the intensity and color of light reaching the eye. Mirrors selectively reflect, and lenses selectively absorb light in specific part of the visible light spectrum.

The mirror is created by vacuum sputtering molecular size metal particles onto the lens substrate. Optically it reduces light in specific wavelengths depending on the coating type and thickness. That's how you get different colors and transparency to the mirror reflection. So it does serve a purpose beside fashion. The Smith blue sensor mirror is nearly transparent and the color you see through it is almost the same as Oakley's Hi Intensity Persimmon, meaning it's only blocks about 20% of the light, mostly in the blue spectrum, resulting in a warm color with a lot of contrast. From the outside it doesn't even look like a mirror. Other mirror lenses like the black chrome are completely opaque from the outside and they block over 80% of the visible light across a broad spectrum resulting in "shades" that gray out bright light. If you take a picture of someone in those goggles, you'll see yourself in the reflection. If you see someone in a fire-red mirror lens, the color he sees from the inside is usually blueish and well shaded.
post #13 of 14
fwiw, the sensor mirror lenses seem to make things appear more yellow/orange. I haven't had a chance to ski with mine yet, but they do seem to increase contrast, and I can see how they wouldn't block enough light for bright sun.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick29 View Post
fwiw, the sensor mirror lenses seem to make things appear more yellow/orange. I haven't had a chance to ski with mine yet, but they do seem to increase contrast, and I can see how they wouldn't block enough light for bright sun.
Sounds like it... So it would be blocking the blue rays better?

I'm extremely sensitive to light (I can almost see through closed eyelids) and my eyes get fatigued from it, so it sounds like the standard version would be a good bet, right ?

Ideally I would get my transition lens in my glasses to cut some of the light, but it needs direct sunlight to do that and of course that's not available under the goggles.
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