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The "Magic Move" in Skiing? - Page 3

post #61 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogonjon View Post
Dynamic Counterbary
Halle's brother?
post #62 of 78
Wax
post #63 of 78
My mantra:
Hands where you can see them.
Eyes down the fall line.
Shins against boot tongues.

Works every time
post #64 of 78
Oh... I forgot... the safety meeting in the morning, preferably after 1-3 runs. that's a magic move.
post #65 of 78
The magic move has a sound to it.

Click
Click

(boots in bindings)
post #66 of 78
Just my biased opinion:

The cut's the thing, just like using a Katana.
On hard pack, learn how to put your skis on edge and make a clean cut.
On powder learn how to leave a clean-cut platform with your ski bases.

You can add on extras, but the key is a clean cut on a tipped ski. Please note, I'm not saying I haven't seen some pretty good big-line sideways skiing on fat skis, nor that a pre-turn mid-air pivot isn't useful, just that I would put a pure clean cut with tipped ski as the most essential move.
post #67 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
there are certain aspects of skiing that you just can't teach people and no matter how many lessons you take, because of the lack of natural talent,(magic move, born in abilities) whatever you want to call it, eventually will hit a brick wall and cease to progress.

"The preponderance of psychological evidence indicates that experts are made, not born."

http://scientificamerican.com/articl...9E83414B7F4945
post #68 of 78
Thanks for the pointer, onyxjl, very interesting... and matches my anecdotal experience, as well...
post #69 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Thanks for the pointer, onyxjl, very interesting... and matches my anecdotal experience, as well...
I find that concept to be empowering and it gives me a lot of hope. I can start learning something new today and eventually be good at it, even if I have no idea what I am doing right now.
post #70 of 78
Great stuff, thanks for sharing. Shows why I am becoming a good skier, because I never had any natural abilities in any sport and don't have great natural balance. I am extremely motivated, have kept the lid open on expanding my knowledge, and have put a lot of hard work and time into it! As you said this article is very empowering, because in spite of the doubts I have, it tells me that I can become a great skier someday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl View Post
"The preponderance of psychological evidence indicates that experts are made, not born."

http://scientificamerican.com/articl...9E83414B7F4945
post #71 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
Great stuff, thanks for sharing. Shows why I am becoming a good skier, because I never had any natural abilities in any sport and don't have great natural balance. I am extremely motivated, have kept the lid open on expanding my knowledge, and have put a lot of hard work and time into it! As you said this article is very empowering, because in spite of the doubts I have, it tells me that I can become a great skier someday.
Excellent, SMJ!

"What the mind of a man can conceive and believe, it can achieve." -- Napoleon Hill
post #72 of 78
The magic movement for me came when I quit resisting the flow of gravity. It is a mental movement and one that is totally counter-intuitive, but Max 501 put it into physical terms best when he said,
"release
float
engage."
Thanks Max.
post #73 of 78
Experts are made???

Well,,, kinda. Better said "self made". A coach can provide a road map to expertsville, but the STUDENT has to make the journey powered by his/her own desire and gumption. 99 percent of the skiing population have the innate tools to get there, yet few ever come close to meeting the potential that resides within. The reason lies solidly in the choices and priorities skiers make, not in individual potential limitations.

I've worked with so many students over the years,,, hundreds,,, who approached their development with long term steadfast dedication. Of those, I can only think of a couple instances where physical limitations offered any significant hurdles to developing very high levels of expertise, yet even in those couple special cases persistence prevailed, and they went on to become skiers of great skill.

If you want it,,, if you have the time and financial means to pursue it,,, the world of expert skiing is there for the taking for almost anyone.
post #74 of 78
The magic move in skiing is "timing"! Timing is everything. If you do what you are supposed to at the right time and moment you only need a fraction of power and muscle effort compared to off the beat muscle grinding. Add some muscle to your perfect timing and you will get the kind of results only expected to be seen at the top level.
post #75 of 78
Rick, thanks for that post, again helps to bolster my belief in my abilities. Having all of that data (100's of skiers like me, pretty much all that succeeded) is exactly what I need to hear. And I believe it too.

15 years of being an OK skier, and then the last 6 of totally dedicating myself to it, and at 55 years old I'm getting closer and closer to being an expert. I know I'll make it!
post #76 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick

Well,,, kinda. Better said "self made". A coach can provide a road map to expertsville, but the STUDENT has to make the journey powered by his/her own desire and gumption. 99 percent of the skiing population have the innate tools to get there, yet few ever come close to meeting the potential that resides within. The reason lies solidly in the choices and priorities skiers make, not in individual potential limitations.
99 percent of the skiing population have the physical ability to become experts, but very few have the mental capacity; the biggest problem is a lack of dedication.

You are right, as an instructor/coach you can provide the path, but the strudent has to walk it.

A real example:

A skier complains that traditional instruction simply does not work, as they don't ever understand what the instructor is talking about. "Should I always ski this way??? Why not just tell me how to move and when?"

So, you introduce them to the key movement that they are obviously missing: Flexion.

Now, we all know that you need a LOT of repetition to change a movement pattern. But the student does not want to believe it... They move between their old ways and this new way you are telling them. So they try to flex between turns from time to time. It's awkward, and they don't know what to expect.

Then they find out that it takes YEARS to figure out how this flexion thing works and how to use it right, and all the while, you have to be doing it to change your ways...Then they find out that WC skiers are still perfecting their timing of flexion; it's such a critical part of skiing, they are still working on it, even at their level. "Geez," they say, "that's too much like work".

So, they give up.

They do it to themselves, they do! And that's what really hurts.

The "magic move" is repeating whatever you need to do to improve over and over and over again. I mean if you won't practice flexing on a flat groomer, how the heck are you gonna do it when you really need it?
post #77 of 78
That's right, BigE. The "magic move" can be found at the Carnegie Hall school of ski instruction.

SkiMangoJazz,,, best of luck on your journey. I have no doubt you'll find success.
post #78 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post

SkiMangoJazz,,, best of luck on your journey. I have no doubt you'll find success.
Aw shucks, thanks!



(But I do agree!)
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