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How to go from good to great? - Page 4

post #91 of 104
Lonnie, well said.
post #92 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Be careful Bud, you might agree with Max.
I have no problem agreeing with Max501 or HH on the importance of proper alignment! or most of the other stuff they promote!

Sure, a great skier could go out on rental equipment and misaligned boots and still make pretty good turns, just not great! and not without compensatory movements, which is my point! Why compensate at all, it is wasted energy and movement that detract from the functional ones.


chrisosyd!

Yes! welcome to epic! look forward to your contributions here and your perspectives on a variety of topics!

bud
post #93 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisosyd View Post
I think a 45 degree twist in the average skiers hips and upper body at the start of the turn might have more of an impact than a 1/2 degree alignment problem.
I agree!

but let's remember the original question was about going from GOOD to great. The above is not good and certainly would gain more from a lesson or two than a 1/2 degree misalignment (which is not their primary problem).

A good skier say a Level III who is looking to make the National team or a J1 racer looking to lower their FIS points, will certainly help rather than harm their chances for success by addressing any misalignments.

I think the reason this thread took this divergence into alignment is because the original question is so general in nature that concise answers are impossible and alignment is something that any good skier looking to reach the next level would benefit from if they need it!
post #94 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Sure, a great skier could go out on rental equipment and misaligned boots and still make pretty good turns, just not great!
bud
Bud, I'm with you on the benefits of proper alignment,,, and I strongly promote it. But perhaps you shouldn't so quickly dismiss the point Heluva was trying to make. Remember Benny Raich a few years back? He was purposely canted so far outside he looked like he was riding a horse down the hill. Still made turns good enough to repeatedly take the top step on a WC podium. Sure, it changes the stance, but the body of a skilled skier can adapt and still perform very well.
post #95 of 104
That may be true Rick, but I will bet he was canted symetrically (which most people are not) and he was obviously compensating in some way. Another point to consider is moving the knee away from the centerline creates progressively more stress on the knee joint as it gets farther out and puts the knee at risk. I have experimented with overcanted alignment and liked the feel of the strong edge on the inside but it definitely hindered the ability to use the outside edge effectively.
post #96 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
That may be true Rick, but I will bet he was canted symetrically (which most people are not) and he was obviously compensating in some way. Another point to consider is moving the knee away from the centerline creates progressively more stress on the knee joint as it gets farther out and puts the knee at risk. I have experimented with overcanted alignment and liked the feel of the strong edge on the inside but it definitely hindered the ability to use the outside edge effectively.
True, Bud. I'm sure he was set up with symmetrical precision. And the extra injury risk he was assuming was one of the concerns. I was just addressing what was possible with skilled skiers, as to Heluva's point. With developing skiers getting properly aligned just removes one of the impediments to learning.

Actually, Bud, Heluva set himself up a bit overcanted this season to experiment with exploiting the very benefit you noticed when you gave it a try.
post #97 of 104

Courses?? Boot alignment??? Good - but only part of the good to great.

If you really want to get gggrrreat - or even goood...
QUIT YOUR JOB AND SELL YOUR CAR.
This sport takes time. A one hundred day season is a start - in the west- with a few thousand vert. My season does not feel good until I get about 15 -20 days in. I race...and I am still an also ran in the Kokanee series here at whistler after five years... Fat-days fill in the rest. I have as much fun on groomers as knee deep.
I want to know how many posting advice in this thread are currently doing it...or have done it in the last five or ten years...since shaped skis no longer went sideways. Or did you pull a season out west after highschool and before you gave it up for a career?? The advice I see here is good - but only part of a few - or twenty- 100 + day seasons.
Gotta go. 78 this week. NO clouds. Minus 15. Gotta re-wax.
post #98 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by g-force View Post
If you really want to get gggrrreat - or even goood...
QUIT YOUR JOB AND SELL YOUR CAR.
This sport takes time. A one hundred day season is a start - in the west- with a few thousand vert. My season does not feel good until I get about 15 -20 days in. I race...and I am still an also ran in the Kokanee series here at whistler after five years... Fat-days fill in the rest. I have as much fun on groomers as knee deep.
I want to know how many posting advice in this thread are currently doing it...or have done it in the last five or ten years...since shaped skis no longer went sideways. Or did you pull a season out west after highschool and before you gave it up for a career?? The advice I see here is good - but only part of a few - or twenty- 100 + day seasons.
Gotta go. 78 this week. NO clouds. Minus 15. Gotta re-wax.
Maybe not 100+ but many here are pretty close even while holding down a real job. I used to do 60-70 days about 10 years ago while teaching part time and working a normal job up, until we had a kid.
post #99 of 104
I decided 6 years ago I needed to make a huge leap in my skill and have skied over 50 times a year since. Some are 2 hour morning sessions, some are full days. Try to ski 4 days a week. Like learning a musical instrument you can't have too many days off in a row, you need to keep repeating the movements.
post #100 of 104
Approx. 220 days a year (give or take) for 10 years
post #101 of 104
 the first question to ask yourself is "what do I want to do?"  Just saying you want to be a better skier isn't enough.  any training program will be or should be focused on specifics.  Never take a lesson without a specific goal.  If you can get enough information, drills and exercises to understand how to reach the goal???? that's when the work starts.  why do football players pro athletes etc do drills and exercises under a coaches supervision???? because that's what works.  there are no short cuts to perfection.  there are no magic bullets.  
when people tell me that there husband, wife, buddies etc are expert skiers, I ask them how they know that...??  they usually answer that they ski places that you don't.  that does not make them expert skiers it just makes them different than you.  as a lifelong ski instructor my reply is that Ill be the judge if they are experts or just extroverts.  get a plan and work it...  the magic bullets are sweat, frustration, instruction and perfect practice.
 c ya
post #102 of 104
Define good and define great.
post #103 of 104
I would say that any reasonably endowed and motivated person can become a good skier, but you must be born freakishly talented and be obsessed with developing that talent to be a great skier. 
post #104 of 104

Ron,
Do you only instruct at Windham?

 

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