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Another Plea For Boot Suggestions

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I am trying to pick out a good boot for this winter, and I need your advice to pick out a decent pair of boots. Since I am planning on ordering the boots online (probably ebay), and I can't choose the exact model of boot that I buy, I need some help figuring out which brands/models I should gravitate towards and which I should avoid.

I went to a local ski shop and they measured my feet. Here are the stats:

toe/heel: 10
arch length: 10.5 left and 10 right
mondo: 27.5
width: B left and C right

I would say I tend to be average to average-slim as far as my feet and calves go; probably a little lower volume than average but nothing out of the ordinary.

I tried on some boots at the store, and I found that the Nordica Beast x10's (27.5) fit very well, but I can't afford the $400 price tag at the store. I also can't find a pair online that fits me... REI has some fairly cheap but not in my size.

I would classify myself as an intermediate skier. I like to go fast, and I tend to stick to the black, and double black slopes (in west virginia/pennsylvania), but I have never owned my own skis and boots. I have skied several times each season for the past 10 years. I am looking for a good all around boot.

I would really really really appreciate any suggestions from the EpicSki community. Thanks guys.
post #2 of 26
DO NOT BUY BOOTS ONLINE!! Sorry for yelling, but that is a sore subject around here. I realize you might be on a budget, but you need to get to a good fitter and work with them. Many times I sell my older boots at a deep discount, but the customer still gets the right boot. Also please do us a favor and buy from a good shop not Dicks or REI. Independent shops are the reason this site can maintain a good forum of professional boot fitters to give advice to members like you.
post #3 of 26
what he said.

you might get a old stock boot for $200, but if it doesn't fit
a) spend $100+ more to get it close
b) it is useless for your shape, and you have just lost $200.
c) maybe, just maybe you luck out and get the right boot. happens less then 10% of the time ....

bad odds, rent boots, and take the boot buying budget and go to vegas
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
First, there are no small independent shops near where I live. I have searched and would much rather spend $150-$200 on a boot that fits, but that does not seem to be an option. There is a Ski Chalet (which is part of a larger chain) nearby but the cheapest boots they have are $350+. Second, I am a college student on a VERY VERY limited budget. If I buy boots from a small store or from Ski Chalet at several hundred dollars then I will not be able to buy a season pass.

I would appreciate some general advice as to which models I should gravitate towards with medium to low volume feet of regular proportion. I love to ski and would rather ski with a slightly ill fitting boot often than ski less often with rentals or not at all. One day I will have a career and make enough money that I can support small shops with knowledgable staff but until that day comes I am going to have to buy lower priced possibly ill fitting boots online.
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
I understand that small ski shop owners and employees drive this forum and are the ones giving advice so I can understand the hostility towards purchasing boots online. I apologize for asking the question, but I really would like some type of answer.

I was sized at the Ski Chalet so I think that gives me a somewhat better chance at getting a boot that fits.
post #6 of 26
nero, I moved your post to the general gear discussion forum for input from the community. The boot pros will not advise you on a specific boot for a foot they have never seen. You'll stand a better chance here.

FWIW, I think you will find a boot on the internet that might get close. It tends to be a crap-shoot and so, if you get lucky, its a great buy. If it takes two or three tries to get the right boot, your money would have been better spent where you can get fitting service and a fit guarantee. JMHO as someone who has already been there and done that.
post #7 of 26
Where do you live? Maybe someone knows of a place near you. Unless you can find someone selling their boots for cheap that happen to be your size you are probably better off waiting till you have money to get the right boot. I would be careful with what you buy becuase unless you know what you are doing chances are you will throw them away next year and have to buy new again.
post #8 of 26
Nero, from my own personal experience and several thousand dollars in boots over the past five years, I would not disagree w/JDoyal or mntlion. It was only after a desperate trip to Green Mountain Orthotics Lab that I finally got straightened out. However, if one cannot afford that route and is truly addicted to skiing as I am, I can certainly understand your plight. As you have requested boot suggestions for average to narrow feet, I would recommend looking for an older used Lange boot on eBay such as a Comp 100 or 120 for fairly high performance, or a CRL 90 as more of an intermediate to expert boot. I'm sure there are many others, but in general, these should be close. Remember, though, that buying boots this way is a complete crap shoot.
post #9 of 26
Item number: 300171157989

http://cgi.ebay.com/Lange-Comp-120-M...QQcmdZViewItem

lange comp 120 LF

THey might fit? a bit safer bet, but again add $50-$150 to fit them and $125 boots, that kind of fit, are not a bargain
post #10 of 26
WARNING!
The following free advice is probably worth exactly what it costs.
There are at least three ways to go here. Rent, buy at a good shop or buy on line. I think there are a lot of placesthat sell boots that do not have the expetise of the bootfitters who post here. At those shops you may pay full retail but not get much service. If you do go the full retail route you've got to do some research to make sure they can take good care of you. There is a big difference between a boot salesman and a boot fitter. Beware.
If you want to try the INTERNET you've got to do your homework. Read everything on EPIC. Read the magazine reviews. If you or your library has reviews from a year or two back you can see which boots the "experts" feel are high volume, medium volume and low volume. They will also note stiff versus not so stiff. On the web you can go to the web site for Footloose and get some excellent expert advice including archives. There are other web sites with good information on boots if you dig deep enough.
Do you remeber the size of the last boots you rented. They were probably too wide and too big overall so start out thinking a size smaller than you rented and probably a boot that most reviewers consider medium to narrow.
If you look for 2-3 year old new boots you can find a discontinued model or color for less than $200. I'd suggest that cars, airplanes and plastic boots have not changed enough in three years to make a 2004 model obsolete.
Some web based retailers will offer to send you two pair so you can try on both sizes in the house and then send one back to them. Even if they don't make it a formal offer most reputable sites offer a 7 day guarantee. If you decide to try the mail order route order two pair. One about the size of your street shoe and one a size smaller.
Do your own shell fit first thing when they arrive. You'll learn how to do that during your research here and elsewhere. Wear both of them around the house on the rug for a while and see which one you like best. If you're lucky one of them (probably the smaller one) will fit. Keep it and send the other one back. If not, send them both back and rent. You've only lost a few dollars to FedEx.
If you do your homework and take your time your NEW boots will be at more comfotable than the boots you will rent. If they do require additional work to make them fit properly a good bootfitter will probably be able to make them fit and you'll have the same $400 invested that you would if you started with the local ski shop. It's strictly a risk reward calculation you will need to make. The reward is you MIGHT save $200. The risk is you do such a poor job of researching and selecting a boot that you spend $200 on a boot that can not be made to fit your foot properly at any price or you decide that neither of the boots fit and you've wasted the $40 with FedEx.
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys. I have been doing quite a bit of research and reading quite a few threads. In fact, I think if I had been working even a minimum wage job the hours that I've been reading this forum and looking for boots online then I would probably be able to buy any boot on the market from a local ski shop.

I am currently in Gaithersburg, Maryland. If anybody knows a reputable ski shop nearby that sells used gear then let me know. I have scoured Google Maps and the Yellow Pages and been unable to find one. I live in Morgantown, WV.

I also want to address this: "I moved your post to the general gear discussion forum for input from the community. The boot pros will not advise you on a specific boot for a foot they have never seen. "

There are many MANY threads on this part of the forum in which boot pros advise people on which brands and models to go with without ever having seen the persons foot. I don't understand why you would move this thread as it seems to be exactly what this - that - part of the forum is for.

I understand why you guys keep telling me that it is not worth it to buy a boot online, but the savings are enormous. Most of the boots I've been looking at which would be $350-$550 in a shop sell for $50-$100 including shipping. In addition, if the boot is a horrible fit I shouldn't have a hard time reselling it at the same price on ebay. I once worked at an iSoldit ebay store and know how to price things on ebay. I generally bid on items which are poorly listed which sell at less than usual which I would be able to resell if necessary.

I thank those of you who have made suggestions thus far. It has been helpful.
post #12 of 26
On ebay if you search Dalbello, there's a shop in Truckee, Cal. that is selling a new Dalbello Proton 10 for $ 150. I wouldn't recommend this boot for a narrow foot, but if your foot is any where near average in width, I believe the prospects of getting a good fit in a Dalbello , one size below your strret shoe size is prfetty good.
post #13 of 26
Basic Bootfitting Information that will aid you tremendously can be found here:

http://www.techsupportforskiers.com/

Click the "Boot Fit" option and read, read, and read. Then check the links of shops and fitters.


I can't reiterate what's been said before: spending a couple 100 dollars for a quick, cheap boot now and then having to spend perhaps twice that to get them properly fit is like going through 2 motions when you only need go through 1.

Get a good fitting boot and shell out a little more. If that means you have to get a paper route or cut a few more lawns or T.A. and grade a few more papers or sling burgers, then do it. You'll be glad in the long run. Nothing is worse than half-assing on your boots.

Trust me. I was skiing for damn near 10+ years on boots at least 4 sizes too big because when I was in high school me and dad just went to the big chain and bought some boots that "felt comfortable." They didn't go through any of the shell sizing or anything that you will read in the Real Skiers guide.

Those boots broke 3 seasons ago. I got a loaner pair for the price of a sixr of good beer (about $9, though I never did pony up the beers!) from a buddy. They were about 2 sizes too big. So I wore 2 pair of super heavy socks and cranked the buckles. They got me through the season, but definitely did more harm in terms of making my skiing even more sloppy.

2 seasons ago I finally realized that I'd been duct-taping the issue for too long and went and started looking at boots. Went to 3 shops locally, but didn't like the fit or the service. Found Realskiers.com, read up on their boot fitting tips, and hit a shop in SLT. The folks were great. Got me a proper fit, but alas didn't have any boots in stock to fit my somewhat narrow heel. At least I was now armed with a proper size and what kind of boot (they rattled off a few makes/models that would most likely fit my foot). Then it was off to 2 more shops before I landed on a pair of boots that fit damn near perfect. I shelled out more than $600 (a lot more'n that if you factor in time and gas spent going to different shops). But at least I have a pair of boots that fit 200 times better than the last two I had and I've noticed a ton of difference in performance.

Don't skimp on the boots, even if it means sacrificing elsewhere (if you're a college student then start eating ramen and give up going out to the pubs...that will save you a ton of skrill right there).
post #14 of 26
Nero,
Go see Brian over in Leesburg,VA at Pro Fit Ski and Skate. He will always give a great deal on left over boots and will fit you,he is very very good and will spend all the time you need to fit right!!! at no charge. a younger friend of mine on a tight budget got a pair of brand new 2yr old Lang Comp 120,s fitted...( blown out and the works ) for under $200 BUCKS
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by nero View Post
Thanks guys. I have been doing quite a bit of research and reading quite a few threads. In fact, I think if I had been working even a minimum wage job the hours that I've been reading this forum and looking for boots online then I would probably be able to buy any boot on the market from a local ski shop.

I am currently in Gaithersburg, Maryland. If anybody knows a reputable ski shop nearby that sells used gear then let me know. I have scoured Google Maps and the Yellow Pages and been unable to find one. I live in Morgantown, WV.

There are a few good boot fitters in the DC area. The ski Challet isn't that horrible. Ski Cener is in NW DC about 20 miles from Gburg and that is the best boot fiter in the region. I don't know what prices they offer but if you need some work done, that is the place to go.
post #16 of 26
Also, look for a gear swap in your area. You might also want to ask the boot fitters in your area if they have a line on some good used boots in your size and shape. Buying boots online unless you know your exact mondo size for that specific model boot (and year) is just pissing money away. The best you can hope for is to buy a shell that isn't completely wrong for your foot shape and size and then go buy custom intuition liners so it actually fits.
post #17 of 26

Boots

Nero, Ski Swap - you can try them on

Put want ad in sports section of classified, lots of skiers around with old cheap boots, once again then you can try them on.

DON'T Buy boots you haven't tried on, i.e. E Bay. If you want to throw your $ away donate to a good charity or give it to epic and ask for old boots, I'll send you mine. If you are really low on funds rent boots.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Pete - renting boots would be more expensive as I plan to ski quite a bit this season.

End of the story: I bought a pair of Salomon Xwave 8's size 28.0 on ebay for $130 including shipping. I fit into 27.5's, but they seemed a bit snug for my liking - felt like my toes were curling at the end. Since I am between 27.5 and 28.0 I figure they will fit as others have rated them true to size. I'll probably come back and let the forum know for other people's sake. This forum is an excellent resource. Thank you all.
post #19 of 26
There ya go....a wide boot for a narrow foot and only one size too big. Nice job!

SJ
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Nero,
Go see Brian over in Leesburg,VA at Pro Fit Ski and Skate. He will always give a great deal on left over boots and will fit you,he is very very good and will spend all the time you need to fit right!!! at no charge. a younger friend of mine on a tight budget got a pair of brand new 2yr old Lang Comp 120,s fitted...( blown out and the works ) for under $200 BUCKS
Nero, I also use Brian at Leesburg Ski and Skate...they are far and away the best in the entire DC area. Its an hour drive for me but its worth the time. You can get used gear from the them and they are master boot fitters. I purchased from them about a year ago and have been very pleased as have many of my ski buddies.

Cheers
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by nero View Post
Pete - renting boots would be more expensive as I plan to ski quite a bit this season.

End of the story: I bought a pair of Salomon Xwave 8's size 28.0 on ebay for $130 including shipping. I fit into 27.5's, but they seemed a bit snug for my liking - felt like my toes were curling at the end. Since I am between 27.5 and 28.0 I figure they will fit as others have rated them true to size. I'll probably come back and let the forum know for other people's sake. This forum is an excellent resource. Thank you all.
Junk the liners that came w/ the boots. Get a thermofit liner(Intuition). It'll be the best fit you've ever had

I had XWave 10, after 3/4 season they had packed-out so bad I could never get get a good fit. Went to Intuition and 3 years later the fit is still perfect
post #22 of 26

Maintaining Solomon Liners

If they start getting a bit loose,

Keep them in a warm place with the buckles open

solomon heat moldable liners, That I would NEVER COOK

Come back when you let them expand.

The guys would like to crank the buckles down when they pack there books always seem to end up with packed out boots.

The liners (With Care) could last 200 or 300 ski days and by that time the material is starting to fray.

I just bought new boots last spring (Same Model) and stuck the same liner / Footbeds in the new shells. I had broken down the shells but not the liners.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by nero View Post
End of the story: I bought a pair of Salomon Xwave 8's size 28.0 on ebay for $130 including shipping. I fit into 27.5's, but they seemed a bit snug for my liking - felt like my toes were curling at the end. Since I am between 27.5 and 28.0 I figure they will fit as others have rated them true to size.

and the start of the second book called "my boots feel a little too big" or "my toes get cold when I over buckle my boots"


you need a narrower boot, and one size down.

but ski em, and see how bad they are

what was wrong with the narrow, smaller langes I linked to? same money, better fit for you?

Oh well,
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
nowhere have I read that the xwaves are a boot for a wide foot....anyways, i was told b or c width is almost average.

I figure no matter what I said that I bought someone would have a problem with it. Anyways... the beast x10's that fit well in the store are supposedly for wide feet as well. In addition, I don't think they are one size too big because my feet are between 27.5 and 28. I would rather my toenails NOT dig into the end of the boot.

Worst case scenario: I'll resell them on ebay and buy something else.

I tried on a similar pair of Lange's the other day at the store and I didn't like the way they felt on my calves.
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
Ughhh... I just found a couple of links that describe them as for wide feet. You guys are probably going to end up being right. I'll probably have to resell them and go with the lange's. Oh well.
post #26 of 26
You said you tried on and liked the Nordica Beasts. They are nice boots. There is a slightly used pair of 27/27.5 on eBay. So far only one bid of $50, but there's still 8 days of auction left.
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