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Edge and base tune-up on NEW skis??

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
The most popular (and longest in business) of our local ski shops here in Boise recommends that brand new skis have a tune-up on the edges (sharpening) and also the bases (ostensibly to clean and wax them). They want 20 bucks to do all that. Is this right?? Do we really need to do that stuff to brand new skis?? Or are they just trying to create extra business for themselves?

thanks,

Peter
Boise, Idaho
post #2 of 20
It depends on the skis. The last couple of pairs of skis I bought were plenty sharp and all I added was a hot wax. My old Kästles came with a factory pre-tune that was superb. I have heard of skis that need to be beveled and sharpened though.
post #3 of 20
No Way!

you only get to ride a factory tune once.

I would get waxed if I were you! (nothing personal)
post #4 of 20
The only thing I would do is wax them. You only have so much life in a ski. Why take some of the edge away when the ski hasn't even seen the snow.
post #5 of 20
factory tunes in all most all cases are better than the stupid ass machine can get the edges dont do it. then they tell you stupid when you dont do but man those freaking edges are sharp from the factory.

wax them and go.
post #6 of 20
It used to be that factory tune wasn't that great, but in recent years they're usually prepared as well if not better than a shop would do. My one suggestion would be to do a coat or two of wax, but leave the edges alone, unless you want them set up differently right away.

The one exception for this is race skis - some (but not all) race stock skis come with edges at 0/0 so you can set them up on your own. And of course race skis should have several waxings prior to use, unless you're mainly using them out of the course (in which case they could still use a few coats).
post #7 of 20
Most skis are sharp enough from the factory. Practically no ski is perfectly set up on the base edge. While I would not suggest that factory tunes are bad....they are not as good as they could be. I mounted three pairs for myself last year. In every case, I pulled a file on the base edge with a .75 or 1.0 degree file guide. In every case, the file pulled some base material, and some base edge.

Most skis are very skiable from the wrapper. Perfection is a different subject and it ain't free.

SJ
post #8 of 20
ski 'em first and only tune 'em if there is something that you don't like about how they ski.

Hot scrape them a couple of times and hot wax them a few times and you are ready to roll.
post #9 of 20
some skiers do a de-tune. that is taking a burnishing stone at 45 degrees to the edge to take a little sharpness of the tip and tail end of the running edge (just a couple inches or so) to make the ski less hooky. Is this old school. I never know, 'cause I am.
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
some skiers do a de-tune. that is taking a burnishing stone at 45 degrees to the edge to take a little sharpness of the tip and tail end of the running edge (just a couple inches or so) to make the ski less hooky. Is this old school. I never know, 'cause I am.
It's a matter of opinion. Here's mine. I like all my skis razor sharp tip to tail. The one time I had a pair of skis "detuned" by a shop' standard practice, I was not very happy with the performance. On the other hand I tuned an old yard-sale wonder straight ski to 0 base 3 side, and will admit it required constant concentration to ski it well. I find with a base bevel of 0.5 to 1 degree it's not a problem having skis sharp the whole length. If you want your new racing skis to ski more like old straight beginner skis and like to smear your turns, then that sounds like a good way to go. If you want instant hook-up and arc-to-arc precise performance you need sharp tips and tails.

Keep them sharp, ski them, and then if you find you can't get used to the immediate response and grip detune progressively at the ends.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
Most skis are sharp enough from the factory. Practically no ski is perfectly set up on the base edge. While I would not suggest that factory tunes are bad....they are not as good as they could be. I mounted three pairs for myself last year. In every case, I pulled a file on the base edge with a .75 or 1.0 degree file guide. In every case, the file pulled some base material, and some base edge.

Most skis are very skiable from the wrapper. Perfection is a different subject and it ain't free.

SJ
I agree. At least get a true bar and check that the bases are flat along their length and at the tips and tails at least 1/3 the way in from the edges, if not totally flat . If the bases are flat you can wax them an go (the wax on new skis is basically only cosmetic and also contains contaminants from the manufacturing process). However, as Sierra Jim points out the edges can frequently be out of spec. This can be for several reasons unrelated to the design or inherent quality of the skis.

What is your ski shops reputation for ski tuning? Do they tune skis to the manufacturers design specs or just do a standard 1 degree base 2 degree side on all the skis that they tune (which, of course, is fine if those are your skis specs but it may not be the best if you ski Atomic, Fischer or some other ski brands which have different edge specs).

If your going to be skiing in soft snow conditions a correct tune may not be so important. However, If you will be skiing on a lot of hardpack a properly tuned skis with correctly set edges will make a recognizable difference.

I do my own maintenance tuning but I often take new skis to a shop to check and do any required initial set up. I go to shops that tune a lot of race skis. They have their reputations to protect and their shop staffs can be counted on to know what they are doing.

You may not be able to beat the factory tune if your skis were produced soon after machinery calibration adjustments were made and machine parts replaced. Unfortunately, you don't know where in the production run your skis were produced and some factories do a better job than others.

Your skis will be skiable out of the wrapper but they may not be the best they can be and certainly not adequately waxed. Unless your skis take a lot of abuse, you will likely replace your skis for the "latest and the greatest" long before you have to worry about worn down skis edges or bases.
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
You guys are the greatest!

That all gives me great confidence in just going ahead and going skiing (bindings, on the other hand, have been bench set and tested at said shop).

I'm an average skier (well, most of the time<w>), not super-perfectionistic or technical, and the skiis I'm asking about are indeed for casual and mostly soft-snow conditions anyway, so with all these comments in support of skipping the ultraperfectionistic edge tune for such as I, I'm convinced the edges the way they are won't need any attention from me (not withstanding the errant rock) for at least the time being.

Thanks very much all! :-) :-)

Peter
Boise, Idaho


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post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor View Post
The one exception for this is race skis - some (but not all) race stock skis come with edges at 0/0 so you can set them up on your own.
X2 And every ski should be waxed prior to use!
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJB View Post
X2 And every ski should be waxed prior to use!

Why?
post #15 of 20
It may sound anal, but set your edges, then wax your skis as many times as possible before you use them. 10x is good. 30x is great. You just spent a good amount of money on the skis. Spend the $20. Or, if you tune your own, spend $20 for a brick of CH8 or BP88 wax. The base is like a sponge and it will absorb wax. It keeps the base from absorbing moisture, and hardens and protects it. I never used to do this, but once my daughter started racing, I've been attending Swix tuning clinics, and have followed their recommendations. The difference is amazing.
post #16 of 20
Hey
post #17 of 20
Hey treebeard, with that kind of advice your gona get NEWFYDOG all worked up!!!! Dont you know that TGR is laughing at us!!!

Good advice, your right on!
post #18 of 20
I agree with treebeard in that if your prep your new skis as suggested in the Swix wax manual they will not ski, they will fly! And I agree with another poster to check the bases with a true bar. Some skis continue to cure after they are ground at the factory so the bases are concave when you get them.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mavrik View Post
............................Dont you know that TGR is laughing at us!!
Does anyone CARE???

SJ
post #20 of 20
" AMEN " Not me...thats for sure.......!
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