EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › I'm Done with carving skis!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

I'm Done with carving skis!! - Page 2

post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
A classic page two type of post! If you have a quiver you're an idiot. If you don't have a quiver you're an idiot.

No wonder these threads degenerate faster than fresh powder on a Saturday morning.
The point was that its the skier not the gear. If you look at modern skis such as SL or GS skis orat something the width of an Allstar then it is clear we are way past where we were with Skinny skis. We skied deep deep powder on skinny skis. No matter what people say the wider skis are not as easy to tip and turn. So why have we contin ed to go wider and wider. I see many many folks on fat fat skis who are "skiing" powder. This involves straight running or making incredibly shallow turns while floating on top
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
The point was that its the skier not the gear. If you look at modern skis such as SL or GS skis orat something the width of an Allstar then it is clear we are way past where we were with Skinny skis. We skied deep deep powder on skinny skis. No matter what people say the wider skis are not as easy to tip and turn. So why have we contin ed to go wider and wider. I see many many folks on fat fat skis who are "skiing" powder. This involves straight running or making incredibly shallow turns while floating on top
so you willing to show me around jackson hole this year? I want to learn from the jedi master.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
The point was that its the skier not the gear. If you look at modern skis such as SL or GS skis orat something the width of an Allstar then it is clear we are way past where we were with Skinny skis. We skied deep deep powder on skinny skis. No matter what people say the wider skis are not as easy to tip and turn. So why have we contin ed to go wider and wider. I see many many folks on fat fat skis who are "skiing" powder. This involves straight running or making incredibly shallow turns while floating on top
noone ever said that you couldnt ski powder on 65mm waisted skis. Any skier worth their salt can rip any condition on anything they want. Also any skier worth their salt choose the right skis for the conditions. This includes useing skinny carvers for groomers, twin tip(which as rule all almost all 80mm underfoot or more) for park skiing, and fat skis for crud and powder. Because each ski works best for its intended purpose.

Look at any MSP, TGR, Warren Miller, Poor Boys, skier you wont see a single person on skinny skis, you especially wont see anybody heliskiing on Ac4s. These guys get paid to ski and get free heli trips and we are suppose to beleive that they are wrong and your are right? c'mon dude it doesnt work like that. IF you the amazing skier you say you are on skinny skis give us your name I bet there is alot of good pictures of you skiing.

As my offer stands come down to snowbird or invite me up to jackson hole. I am sure I could learn something from you.
post #34 of 43
I don't ski as often as would like due to work and family stuff, so I need to get the most out of every minute and every day that I do get to ski. Having a selection of the best tools for the job helps me to make the most of it.

I can't ski first to last chair on a powder day on my carving skis anymore, I'll admit it.

I can't ski bumps all morning on my mid fats and still have legs to go to the end of the day. Come to think of it I probably couldn't do that on any skis.

Battling bulletproof on wide skis can be a chore.

I do know though, that because of a quiver I can get more turns than I would otherwise.
post #35 of 43
Thread Starter 
My point is that unless my "stiff,carving skis" are super sharp they just plain suck. But my "softer,fun" (fat) skis are just as bad on groomers when dull as a dull carver but are still fun everywhere else. For me ice isn't fun, ever. I'm done trying to make it fun by skiing race type skis. I don't find much drop off when on firm snow on my fun skis when they are sharp. Sure a little less stable at strait away speed and takes a little more work for quick turns but the trade off everywhere else is what I'm after these days. Groomed runs bore me now.
post #36 of 43
As usual, there are a number of obvious truths here.

(#1) All else equal...Sharp skis hold where dull skis won't....DUH!!
(#2) Given equal grip, the narrower ski still goes egde to edge quicker....DUH!!
(#3) The carver will put more energy, precision, and excitement into a day of groomer zoomin'.....Duh!!
(#4) A fattie that holds great on the groomers is not usually the best of it's ilk in the off road....Duh!!
(#5) One can certainly make a day of it skiing the groomer zoomers on fatties....If one had a choice in the matter, I have no idea why one would choose to do so.

So......if I were disappointed in the performance of my dull carvers on the hard stuff, I'd buy a file rather than a new pr. of twips.

But that's just me...........

SJ
post #37 of 43
I just sold my last "carvers" - a pair of Fischer RC4 WC SL's - yesterday for $275 w/bindings, skied on about 5 times. Too bad the classifieds weren't open to the general public. Someone could have gotten a great deal... I had them about 2 seasons, but never really used them, and since I got TT's last year, I knew I'd never use them again.

I *might* miss them though. Who knows. I did pick up a pair of replacement sticks though - some Elan M02.2 double rails, which I'm sure will be fine on Midwest hardpack. I still have one set of "long boards" left though - just in case BIG makes a comeback.
post #38 of 43
if my resort had consistent access to off-piste, I'd be done too. But it doesn't.

I own my quiver based purely on the resort I ride in Japan. Gotama/fritsche and Jetfuel. When the base has arrived, and if the snow is cold, I'm in the trees on my gotamas. If the snow is bad, old, or thin, I'm arcing groomers on my jet fuels.

so while some live the wonderful life of access to terrain, some of us little fellas still have windows of the season where the trees aren't doable and the big lines don't exist. so we go arcing.
post #39 of 43
Anybody that has a chance, demo some Head SuperShapes or Fischer RX-8. I have the Heads, 66 mm under foot, 12m radius, and they're the most fun I've had carving, bumps, fresh up to a foot deep, crud, ...everything. They're stable fast & straight and have a fairly big sweet spot. I'm going to demo some Head Xenon 7.0, 73 mm, 13 m radius, and they're supposed to be even more fun that the SS, but not for hard snow.
post #40 of 43
My quiver has slowly evolved to contain several pairs of fatter and wider skis, but I still find that there is no substitute for a strong narrow-waisted carver (RX-8) when I am skiing on groomed trails with mostly manmade snow. Every season, there will be a week or two when groomed manmade snow is the default condition, for whatever reason (weather, lack of natural snowfall, etc). Sure, I can have fun on any ski, but the carvers are the only skis that can truly elevate the experience for me. When carving becomes the name of the game, it helps to have the right ski. I have tried using my mid-fats as a carver, and they do well, but ultimately they are too slow edge to edge and are not athletic enough. Some of my wider skis will arc a turn pretty well, but they are way too slow edge to edge and lack the leverage to bite hard into a turn. So, I still appreciate the role of a narrow waisted carver myself.
post #41 of 43
Just back from Whistler BC yesterday. use my volkl 5* the first day on Whistler and Gotama the following day on Blackcomb. Definitely will go with Gotama 90% for the rest of the season.
post #42 of 43
Doesn't it depend on where you live and do most of your skiing? A person skiing Seven Springs every weekend probably shouldn't be on a Gotama, and a person who exclusively hits Snowbird freshies probably should find a more suitable ski than an RX8.

As for claims that Gotamas carve hardpack just as well as a narrow, stiff carver; or that RX8's handle deep snow just as well as a 100mm ski underfoot: c'mon, it just isn't true! Skis are tools: there are more and less suitable tools for specific jobs. Yes, you can ride a mountain bike on a long road ride, and it will get you from point A to point B eventually, but not as fast as if you had a road bike. So, giving the guy who is riding a road bike a hard time, just because he isn't "man" enough to pedal around a heavy bemoth of a bike and finish an hour behind everyone with enough sense to use a road bike, is silly!

More often than not, these threads develop into a "I ski wide skis and am a backcountry film star, you skinny-ski people are just racer punks and old-schoolers" vs. the "I am a racer/ex-racer on real skis, you wide-ski oafs can't carve a turn to save your life" mentality, which gets old. So, you like to ski Gotamas on hardpack? Fine. Have fun. You would probably have more fun on a high-end carver, but hey, you are still skiing and having a good time. There is nothing wrong with that. And, you want to battle 3 feet of new snow on a pair if 165cm carvers? Sure, it can be done, and will be a good time. But, you would have carried more speed and used less effort on a pair of bigger skis, but hey, skiing is skiing, isn't it? Isn't that the point?
post #43 of 43
What Dawg said.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › I'm Done with carving skis!!