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Start a quiver or ???

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I've always only used one pair of skis per season. Maybe kept some old rock skis. As my (primarily) East coast ski has grown from 68 to 75 to 77 now 82mm wide, I was considering adding a second pair of skis, for ice.

I just picked up a pair of iM 82's for such a good deal, I figured I could get a second pair.

I was thinking about Fischer RX8's or Dynastar Contact 11's or maybe a Head Supershape. All can be found on Ebay for a decent price.

Then I read the review of the Atomic Nomad Crimson here http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=61900 and now I'm considering just getting the Atomics & selling the iM82's.

I'd rather only have to deal with one pair of skis.

Any thoughts?
post #2 of 13
I too, read the review of the Nomad Crimson, and while Micheal and Scott are terrific reviewers who can be counted upon, I would caution you on trading in a wonderful ski in the im82 based on a review.
Try to demo them and see if it is a better for you than the im82.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post
I've always only used one pair of skis per season. Maybe kept some old rock skis. As my (primarily) East coast ski has grown from 68 to 75 to 77 now 82mm wide, I was considering adding a second pair of skis, for ice.
Ice?! I'm sure you must mean hardpack...

Do you want a ski that is narrow and tight like a race ski, or just a narrow carver?
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
Ice?! I'm sure you must mean hardpack...

Do you want a ski that is narrow and tight like a race ski, or just a narrow carver?
I do a lot of day trips to Northern Jersey. Hardpack is ice. But I would be looking for a narrow carver that would work in bumps also.
post #5 of 13
From Sunapee's definition of snow conditions -

Hard Pack (HP) - When natural or machine made snow becomes very firmly packed. You can plant a pole in hard pack snow, but it takes more effort than packed powder.

Icy (Icy) - Not to be confused with frozen granular, ice is a hard, glazed surface created either by freezing rain, ground water seeping up into the snow and freezing, or by the rapid freezing of snow saturated with water from rain or melting. Ice will not support a ski pole. It is important to note that frozen granular is opaque whereas ice is translucent.

Anyway...

How good are you? That may make things easier.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
44 years old, level 8, 175lbs. I lost 20-25lbs last year, along with a lot of muscle. I was hospitalized for 5 months last year. Missed my first ski season since I was 12.

So I am just trying to make skiing as easy as possible for the coming season. I had figured the 82's would be good for crud or any fresh snow I see. Since I am not as strong as I was before, I was looking for something that would require less effort to ski when there has been no new snow for a while.

I want a short radius ski, since I have the other end covered. Also want it to be stable at speed, since thats what I like. But it also has to be able to make tight fall line turns with less effort than the Monster.

Not sure how much effort the Crimson or Blackey Nomads would require relative to the Monsters. I'm torn because I just hate the idea of having the wrong ski for a given day. Parking sucks at my local mountain, so changing out skis could take 45 minutes and I do a lot of half days there. Wouldn't want to waste that time.

Thanks
post #7 of 13
the rx8 works on ice, likes to make short, snappy turns, and doesn't mind going fast. and it's not a lot of work either.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post
44 years old, level 8, 175lbs. I lost 20-25lbs last year, along with a lot of muscle. I was hospitalized for 5 months last year. Missed my first ski season since I was 12.

So I am just trying to make skiing as easy as possible for the coming season. I had figured the 82's would be good for crud or any fresh snow I see. Since I am not as strong as I was before, I was looking for something that would require less effort to ski when there has been no new snow for a while.

I want a short radius ski, since I have the other end covered. Also want it to be stable at speed, since thats what I like. But it also has to be able to make tight fall line turns with less effort than the Monster.

Not sure how much effort the Crimson or Blackey Nomads would require relative to the Monsters. I'm torn because I just hate the idea of having the wrong ski for a given day. Parking sucks at my local mountain, so changing out skis could take 45 minutes and I do a lot of half days there. Wouldn't want to waste that time.

Thanks
Much of what you say in your question and particularly this part...(trying to make skiing as easy as possible) would lead me to suggest something different than the Crimson or the Head as neither are particularly easy for a lighter or less powerful skier. The Blackeye is a possibility but I'll suggest something that's probably not on your radar at all......

The Fischer Cool Heat is the (deservedly) revered RX-8 build but on a wider chassis and with the addition of the flowflex plate. When I skied the Cool, I was prepared for a tussle because I really misunderstood what the flowflex does. I was pleasantly surprised as the Cool did not feel demanding at all. This plate totally frees the middle of the ski while providing additional dampening and leverage. While not quite as nimble as the RX-8, I think the Cool Heat does many things better (and that is saying something)

SJ
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Definitely trying to make skiing easier for this season. I read some reviews of the Cool Heat, including Dawgs, and they all seem to say the Cool heat is a more demanding ski than the Monsters. Doesn't sound too promising.

Thanks,
Gary
post #10 of 13
Gary,

As yo know I have a very similar ski (the im88)-And I know Jersey and Catskill skiing...

I would pick either the Dynastar Contact 11 (excellet bumper, GS feel)

or the much loved Head SuperShape (SL feel-also good in the bumps--BUT only if you're a bump "carver")--can't miss with the similar RX8 either.

I skied the Nomad Crimson at a demo last year-you'd be trading even for the head 82 (IMHO well, honestly, I think the head is the better ski)---

I'm a fan of two pairs of skis-especially pairing a stable crud buster with a quick turner.

And FWIW, when the copious amounts of rain that falls on top of man made in nj arrives- it pools and forms ice--nice, blue and shiny ice. And not even the starriest-eyed optimist in the Intrawest PR department can call it anything else.

Liam
post #11 of 13
NJ & PA ice ..... we get the glaze post rain freezie stuff too but .. what is common here is that the compacted surface below the groomed is exposed usually by about 11 am when all of the granular is pushed aside.

It's ice.
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Liam.

Have you tried the SS, RX8 & Contacts? I/ve been leaning towards the RX 8. Any size recommendations? I've been about your weight. No real plans to demo. Just plan on finding a good deal on Ebay.

Gary
post #13 of 13
Gary,

I've had the opportunity to try them all-
The RX8 and the Contact I liked at the slightly longer lengths (175cm and 178cm respectively)--but most folks would push the rx in a 170 and the Contact 11 in the 172--they might be right, too-but I'm coming to appreciate slightly longer skis.

The Head SS is just about perfect at 170cm.

Can't miss with any of these skis by the way.
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